October 13, 2006

Kathleen's Dora Quote Commentary

Kathleen Wright
CompLit 240 Section 003

“This first account may be compared to an unnavigable river whose stream is at one moment choked by masses of rock and at another divided and lost among shallows and sandbanks. I cannot help wondering how it is that the authorities can produce such smooth and exact histories in cases of hysteria.?
Pg. 10- Dora: An Analysis of a Case of Hysteria

I found this quote to be very intriguing because it sums up what makes Freud’s studies or any mystery really, interesting and worth the time to take a deeper look. Freud is referring to how when he first questions Dora about her life and illness, he does not steer or direct her flow of thought but lets it run its course so to speak. The “choked? moments he mentions are referring to her repressions she’s made, so far buried in the inner conscience that they are seemingly lost at the beginning of treatment. The “shallows? he speaks of is actually irony because instead of appearing not intellectually profound while first speaking, Freud can see something deeper, something that Dora cannot see. His theory on authorities holds true in all the mysteries we have read and why the authorities are often unsuccessful in solving mysteries. “Exact," or suitably necessary answers are what the authorities produce to conclude, whereas Freud the detective takes the time to find a “smooth,? or being free from trouble or difficulty answer to the problem, the case of hysteria, at hand.

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October 05, 2006

Kathleen's Oedipus Quote Commentary

Kathleen Wright
CompLit 240 Section 003

“It’s clear you hate to yield, clear you yield only under pressure, only when you’ve worn out the fierceness of your anger.?
Pg. 54 Lines 890-892

Oedipus The King

At the end of the argument between Kreon and Oedipus, Kreon makes an audacious statement in the heat of the moment which couldn’t burn closer to the truth. Yielding in this sense is surrendering to the argument, persuasion, or influence of another. It is also a yielding of power, giving in to something greater, sacrificing oneself. Pertaining to this argument, Oedipus won’t admit that Kreon is right, and wants to blame him for the murder of Laios. This is dramatic irony because indeed Oedipus murdered Laios on the road just because Laios’ chariot failed to yield to Oedipus’ passing. Oedipus is stubborn, and will only yield (submit) when the pressure becomes too great for him, a man, to handle. It is a submission that Kreon says only comes about after a great fight. Oedipus has a short temper, seen in this scene, which depicts ferocity, and often brings about rash thoughtless action. Clarity is thus another key part of the statement because Kreon, as well as all the characters and readers, can see without obstruction the truth and want Oedipus to be not be obscured any longer, and to calmly let go of the past to move into a new light, the light of truth.

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September 21, 2006

Kathleen's Quote Commentary on Poe

Kathleen Wright
CompLit 240, Section 003

"He makes in silence, a host of observations and inferences. So, perhaps, do his companions; and the difference in the extent of the information obtained lies not so much in the validity of the inference as in the quality of the observation."
Poe's "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" (Pg. 399)

Dupin's detective style is marked by a multitude, or host, of close observations of the situation at hand. Of course, the police are also making several observations, but they are concluding with induction by broad assumptions, rather than deduction. Dupin's observations are sound, seeing the whole picture- what appears to be there and what really is there. This is what causes him to see such detail as the broken nail, which was easily overlooked by the police investigation. Silence is another key factor as Dupin takes time to absorb the situation, using all his senses to solve the mystery. This quote is the key to solving the murders but also to figuring out life, one situation at a time.

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Kathleen's Practice Quote Commentary

CompLit240 Section 003
"The Murders in the Rue Morgue"
Edgar Allen Poe

"He makes, in silence, a host of observations and inferences. So, perhaps, do his companions; and the difference in th extent of the information obtained lies not so much in the calidity of the inference as in the quality of the observation." (Pg. 399)

This quote struck me in that it is not only the key to solving the mystery at hand, but the key to figuring out life, one situation at a time. This 'seeing of things' is Dupin's detective style. His keen power of observation of the whole picture is what enables him to see what others do not. By not making broad inferences he is able to discover the details, such as the broken nail, or the "mysterious voice." The police were unable to solve because they made assumptions on how things seemed- such as the nail looked the same, or ignoring the clue about the voices. This is a great example of appearance verses reality and how important it is to really learn to see, both what is in front of us, and what is beyond the fascade.

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