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September 20, 2011

Dinosaur Death by Asteroid Theory is now Doubtful

NASA's WISE (Wide infrared survey explorer) Scanned the night sky between January 2010 and February 2011 and discovered 33,000 new asteroids. Originally, scientists were fairly confident that the extinction of dinosaurs about 65 million years ago was due to the impact of a mountain-sized asteroid piece on earth from a larger asteroid known as Baptistina. This impact was thought to have caused the dust cloud, cold temperatures, starvation, etc. that we are all familiar with. New evidence due to the WISE scan of the sky concludes that the original calculations were off, and the age and reflection of the pieces of the Baptistina collision were not the cause if the dinosaur extinction.

The case has now gone cold.

You can read the whole article at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110919144042.htm

Posted by paukenth at September 20, 2011 04:57 PM

Comments

The title of your post was a bit misleading, I thought it was going to be a revolutionary discovery that dinosaurs did not die from an asteroid collision. Nevertheless, discovering that the asteroid did not come from Baptistina is a very impressive feat.

Posted by: jeffsong at September 20, 2011 10:55 PM

Good point Jeff. The theory that an asteroid was responsible for the extinction of the dinosaurs is still the best theory and this new WISE results never hinted otherwise. But, WISE was looking at specific asteroid remnants that might have been part of the original asteroid that did kill the dinosaurs. As Jeff says, it was found unlikely to be from the Baptistina collision.

Posted by: christoq at September 21, 2011 05:46 PM

Good point Jeff. The theory that an asteroid was responsible for the extinction of the dinosaurs is still the best theory and this new WISE results never hinted otherwise. But, WISE was looking at specific asteroid remnants that might have been part of the original asteroid that did kill the dinosaurs. As Jeff says, it was found unlikely to be from the Baptistina collision.

Posted by: christoq at September 21, 2011 05:52 PM

Good point Jeff. The theory that an asteroid was responsible for the extinction of the dinosaurs is still the best theory and this new WISE results never hinted otherwise. But, WISE was looking at specific asteroid remnants that might have been part of the original asteroid that did kill the dinosaurs. As Jeff says, it was found unlikely to be from the Baptistina collision.

Posted by: christoq at September 21, 2011 05:53 PM

I've always been a big fan of dinosaurs. I think it is an important part of Earth's history to know how they were killed.

Posted by: derbach at September 22, 2011 12:08 AM

I like dinosaurs too.

Posted by: paukenth at September 22, 2011 12:11 AM

I am shocked by how many asteroids WISE had discovered over a year. This news is quite exciting because I feel as if many scientists had thought that the dinosaurs became extinct due to Baptistina. This research could lead to a major breakthrough in the discovery of how dinosaurs actually became extinct.

Posted by: aakashj at September 23, 2011 04:26 PM

I really do wonder how the dinosaurs came to be extinct. It's incredible how many asteroids were discovered.

Posted by: dhurvitz at September 25, 2011 10:30 PM

History always changes as the science finds something new! this shows how important science is not for only future but also for past.

Posted by: sangsong at September 26, 2011 11:07 PM

Interesting article. I bet there will be hundreds of more years of debate before scientists can agree how the dinosaurs were truly killed off.

Posted by: balerner at October 2, 2011 10:40 PM

Wow! This discovery is pretty mind boggling.... How could we be so sure for so long that an asteroid was the reason the dinosaurs became extinct? Maybe they were all killed off by some plague that we'll never see evidence for. Dinosaurs and their extinction is very intriguing!

Posted by: rmbonds at October 10, 2011 06:09 PM

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