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February 18, 2011

Tiny, Earth-Like Planet Discovered

The first solid proof of a rocky planet beyond solar system has been found using the Kepler Space Telescope.
The planet, Kepler-10b is 1.4 times the size of Earth and rotates 20 times closer to its parent star than Mercury's orbit. This makes it much to hot for the life on earth, close to 2500 degrees Farenheit.

Although the planet is too hot for Earth organisms, the discovery of the planet still marks an important milestone in Astronomy. It is the first definitive rocky planet ever found and its existence proves that Earth-like planets exist.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41007790#

Posted by stoneswt at February 18, 2011 05:37 PM

Comments

It is so cool when new planets, and objects are discovered outside the solar system. I feel like there has to be life outside somewhere in the universe, and the more planets and objects we discover outside our solar system means the closer we are getting to discovering other life forms. The better technology we get, the better observations and information we can gather. This stepping stone is one of the few that will get us closer and closer to finding out what more our universe has to offer us.

Posted by: melmccor at February 20, 2011 08:46 PM

I think there will be many more to come. I found this article which seems to indicate that we are able to see (from research thus far) 1235 planets in our galaxy alone that are potential candidates to host life. Of these candidates 54 are in the "Goldilocks zone". However, there is no word whether they are terrestial planets with the proper atmosphere, water, etc. But at least we have a baseline as to which planets we can test to find life (and maybe interact with!).
Here's the link: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1358838/Milky-Way-50-billion-planets-estimates-cosmic-census.html

Posted by: jeffkong at February 21, 2011 07:29 PM

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