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December 02, 2008

Winter 2009 Course - Musicology 405/505: "Kunqu: The Classical Opera of Globalized China," Joseph Lam

Musicology 405/505. Kunqu: the Classical Opera of Globalized China.
Winter 2009; Tuesday and Thursday: 10:30 a.m.-12:00.p.m.; Rm 706, Burton Memorial Tower, Central Campus.

Course Introduction
This course offers students a unique opportunity to intellectually and performatively learn kunqu, the classical opera of China, and an UNESCO designated Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. This course is divided into two parts. In the first 9 weeks of the course, Joseph Lam (Professor of Musicology, SMTD, U-M) will lecture on kunqu history, theories, and musical and theatrical features, providing students a comprehensive understanding of the genre. During this period, students will also learn about the genre with reading, listening, and viewing assignments. In the last 6 weeks of the course, Professor Zhang Xunpeng of Shanghai, China, an internationally renowned kunqu artist and teacher, will teach students kunqu speaking, singing, dancing, and acting. By the end of the course, students will perform in a public presentation arias/scenes of kunqu that they will have learned from Professor Zhang.

This course and its public performance are sponsored by the School of Music, Theatre and Dance, the Center for World Performance Studies, the Center for Chinese Studies, and the Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs.

Syllabus
January 8 Introduction
Reading
Isabel Wong, “ Kunju,? in East Asia: China, Japan, and Korea, the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music (New York: Routledge, 2002), 289-296.
Bell Yung, “ Chinese Opera, An Overview,? in East Asia: China, Japan, and Korea, the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music (New York: Routledge, 2002), 275-280.
Rulan Pian Chao, “Peking Opera,? in East Asia: China, Japan, and Korea, the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music (New York: Routledge, 2002), 281-288.
Listening and Viewing
A selection of video-recordings of scenes of Cantonese opera, Kun opera, and Peking opera.

January 13 kunqu history 1
Reading
William Dolby, “ Nanxi Drama, Chuanqi Drama, and the Beginnings of Kunqu Drama;? “the Theatre World during the Ming Dynasty;? in A History of Chinese Drama (London: Paul Elek, 1976), 60-113.
Listening and viewing
A selection of video-recordings of scenes of Cantonese opera, Kun opera, and Peking opera.

January 15 kunqu history 2
Reading
William Dolby, “A Diversity of Dramatic Styles during the Early Qing,? in A History of Chinese Drama (London: Paul Elek, 1976), 114-156.
Cyril Birch, “To the Reader as Fellow Mandarin,? in Scenes for Mandarins: The Elite Theater of the Ming (New York: Columbia Press, 1995), 1-20.
Listening and viewing
A selection of video recordings of kunqu scenes.

January 20 kunqu dramas
Reading
A.C. Scott trans., “Longing for Worldly Pleasures (“Sifan?),? in Traditional Chinese Plays, vol. 2 (Madison: the University of Wisconsin Press, 1969), 1-40.
Cyril Birch translated, excerpts from The Peony Pavilion (Boston: Cheng & Tsui, 1994), 42-51, 55-62, 120-134.
Lindy Li Mark translated, excerpts from the Peony Pavilion the Young Lovers’ Edition, manuscript, 2004.
Listening and viewing
Video recordings of “Longing for Worldly Pleasures (“Sifan?),? and the “Interrupted Dream,? from Peony Pavilion, the Young Lovers’ Edition, 2007.

January 22 kunqu dramas
Reading
Joseph Lam translated, “Running Away in the Dark of the Night? (“Yeban?), manuscript.
Yang Hsien-yi and Gladys Yang translated, excerpts from The Palace of Eternal Youth (Beijing: Foreign Language Press, 1955), 63-74, 130-141, 176-179, 188-195.

Listening and viewing
Video recordings of “Running Away? and scenes from the Palace of Eternal Youth: “The Alarm,? “Hearing the Bells,? and “Mourning before the Image.?

January 27 kunqu speaking and chanting
Reading:
Chao Yuanren, “ Tones, Intonation, Singsong, Chanting, Recitative, Tonal Composition, and Atonal Composition in Chinese,? in For Roman Jacobson, compiled by Morris Halle (The Hague: Mouton, 1956), 52-59.
Bell Yung, “Creative Process in Cantonese Opera1: the Role of Linguistic Tones,? Ethnomusicology 27 (1983), 29-47.

Listening and Viewing
A selection of audio and video recordings of kunqu speaking and chanting.

January 29 kunqu make-up, costume and acting
Reading:
George R. Kernodle, “ Style, Stylization, and Styles of Acting,? Educational Theatre Journal (1960) 251-260.
Joseph Lam, “Kunqu Representations of the Chinese Self,? manuscript.

Listening and Viewing
A selection of audio and video recordings of kunqu speaking and chanting.

February 3 kunqu singing
Reading
Richard Strassberg, “The Singing Techniques of K’un-ch’ü and their Musical Notation,? Chinoperl Papers 6 (1976), 45-81.
Koo Siu Sun and Diana Yue translated, Wei Lang-fu: Rules of Singing Qu (Hong Kong: Oxford, 2006), 1-86 (English translations only).
Listening
A selection of audio and video recordings of kunqu arias.

February 5 kunqu singing and instrumental playing
Reading
Joseph Lam, “ The Virtuosic Music of Kunqu,? manuscript.
Listening and Viewing
Five versions of audio/video recordings of “Zaoluopao? from five productions of the Peony Pavilion.

February 10 kunqu gongs and drums
Reading
Rulan Chao Pian, “The Function of Rhythm in the Peking Opera,? in the Musics of Asia (Manila: The National Music Council of the Philippines, 1971), 114-131.
Li Minxiong, “ Ensembles: Percussion Music,? and “ Ensembles: Chuida Music,? in East Asia: China, Japan, and Korea, the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music (New York: Routledge, 2002), 191-199.

Listening and Viewing
Video-recordings of kunqu gong and drum performance techniques.

February 12 kunqu music: 21st century and westernized practices
Reading
Joseph Lam, “Tone Colors and Orchestration in Contemporary Kunqu,? English version of “Kunqu qiyue yu yinse,? in Mudanting guoji yantao hui, Beijing 2007 (Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong, in press).
Tsui Ying-fai, “ Ensembles: The Modern Chinese Orchestra,? in East Asia: China, Japan, and Korea, the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music (New York: Routledge, 2002), 227-231.
Han Kuo-huang, “The Modern Chinese Orchestra,? Asian Music 11( 1979), 1-43.

Listening and Viewing
Excerpts from the Peony Pavilion, the Young Lovers’ Edition

February 17 kunqu and globalized China
Reading
Catherine C. Swatek, “ Peter Sellars’s Efforts to Reawaken Kun Opera,? and “ To Perform ‘Chuanqi’ We will Recreate a Chuanqi,? in Peony Pavilion on Stage (Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, U-M, 2002),203-256.

February 19 kunqu and global audiences
Reading
Joseph Lam, “ Kunqu, the Classic Opera of Globalized China,? Manuscript.
Joseph Lam, “Chinese Music and its Globalized Past and Present,? Macalester International 21 (2008), 29-77.

Listening
A selection of audio recordings of contemporary Chinese music.

February 24 Spring Break/no class
February 26 Spring Break/no class
March 3 Review 1
March 5 Review 2
March 10 Mid-term exam and term paper due
March 12 kunqu speaking
March 17 kunqu speaking
March 19 kunqu singing
March 24 kunqu singing
March 26 AAS/kunqu singing
March 31 kunqu singing
April 2 kunqu acting/dancing
April 7 kunqu acting/dancing
April 9 Rehearsal 1
April 14 Rehearsal 2
April 16 Rehearsal 3
April 18 Performance
April 21 Post-performance discussion

Grading
Attendance 10%
Term paper 20%
Mid term exam 20%
Rehearsals and Performance 50%

Term paper
Undergraduate students will write term papers of 10-15 pages on kunqu topics approved by the musicology instructor (Joseph Lam).
Graduate students will write terms papers of 20-25 pages on kunqu topics approved by the musicology instructor (Joseph Lam).

Mid-term exam
The exam will include 3 parts: 1) identification of 5 kunqu musical excerpts; 2) brief explanations of 5 kunqu terms; 3) 1 short essay discussing one of the many issues traditional kunqu faces in the globalized world; all examination materials are covered by lectures and assignments.

Office hour
Thursday 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.; BMT 402.
By appointment.

Contact info
Joseph Lam: jsclam@umich.edu; 734-647-9471
Zhang Xunpeng: TBA

Posted by zzhu at December 2, 2008 11:23 AM