« March 2011 | Main | May 2011 »

April 21, 2011

The best of Winter 2011!


Bookmark and Share


Staying busy:

1. Monday, May 9, 2011: Free concert in Mandarin Chinese and Taiwanese dialects celebrating Amazing Taiwan Music Culture Tour, Farmington Hills.

2. Friday-Saturday, May 20-21: Michigan Meeting "Developing Global Sustainability - U.S./China Partnerships."

3. July 16 - October 23: Major exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art - Multiple Impressions: Contemporary Chinese Woodblock Prints.


Keeping up with the times:

4. Whenever there is a China/U.S. state visit, CCS alumni become extra busy as different media outlets chase after them for insightful commentaries. This January’s U.S. visit by Chinese president Hu Jintao is no exception.

5. U-M history professor and CCS faculty associate Christian de Pee, blogs from the Joint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and International Convention of Asia Scholars in Honolulu.

6. Attention, iPhone, iPad and Android device users! Install the free Pulse app on your phone and/or tablet and experience CCS blog in a brand new way!


Job hunting for China hands:

7. Manager, Confucius Institute @ China Institute, New York, NY.

8. Coordinator, Year of China at Brown University.

9. Position at Sotheby's: Chinese Works of Art Specialist.

10. NYU in Shanghai is hiring!

Posted by zzhu at 11:03 PM

April 14, 2011

Developing Global Sustainability - U.S./China Partnerships

May 20-21, 2011
Organized by faculty from the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, the Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute, the Michigan Memorial Energy Institute, the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, the UM/PKU Joint Institute and the UM/SJTU Joint Institute, the Center for Chinese Studies, and OVPR.

POSTER COMPETITION - ABSTRACTS ARE DUE APRIL 22, 2011

Click here for more information on the poster competition as well as registration.

Program

The meeting will begin on Friday, May 20, 2011 at 9 a.m. with welcome remarks, followed by the first plenary address. The second half of the morning will consist of concurrent sessions on the three conference themes of energy, transportation and water. Following lunch, concurrent sessions will continue through the end of the afternoon.

A banquet will be held on Friday evening followed by an event focused on the cross-cultural challenges of communicating about sustainability.

On Saturday, May 21, a plenary address will take place at 9:30 a.m. The second half of the morning will consist of concurrent sessions on the three conference themes of energy, transportation and water. Following lunch, additional sessions will held. Final remarks for the all participants are scheduled for mid-afternoon.

PLENARY SESSIONS

OPENING PLENARY: DEVELOPING GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY - CHINA/U.S. PARTNERSHIPS

Xia Guang, Director
Policy Research Center for Environmental Economy
Ministry of Environmental Protection
Beijing, China

David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs
U.S. Department of Energy
Washington, D.C. US

OPENING PLENARY PANEL: DEVELOPING GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY - CHINA/U.S. PARTNERSHIPS

Xia Guang, Director
Policy Research Center for Environmental Economy
Ministry of Environmental Protection
Beijing, China

Jun Ma, Director
Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs
Beijing, China

Neil Hawkins, Vice President of Sustainability and Environment, Health and Safety
The Dow Chemical Company
Midland, MI US

David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs
U.S. Department of Energy
Washington, D.C. US

PLENARY: INFORMATION CHANGES EVERYTHING - INFORMING THE PUBLIC ABOUT THEIR SUSTAINABILITY CHOICES

Craig Cox, Senior Vice President
The Environmental Working Group
Ames, IA US

Jun Ma, Director
Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs
Beijing, China

PLENARY: CULTURE DRIVES DEMANDS - STEPS TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE PACIFIC RIM

Yasheng Huang, Professor of International Management
International Program Professorship in Chinese Economy and Business
MIT Sloan School of Management
Cambridge, MA US

David E. Nye, Professor and Chair
Center for American Studies
University of Southern Denmark
Odense, Denmark

DISCUSSANT: Irving T. Salmeen, Research Scientist
Center for the Study of Complex Systems
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US


TOPICAL SESSIONS

Clean Vehicles for Tomorrow's Transportation

Dennis Assanis, Professor and Director
Michigan Memorial Phoenix Energy Institute
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

Christopher Grundler, Deputy Director
Environmental Protection Agency
National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory
Ann Arbor, MI US

Huang Zhen, Vice President
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Shanghai, China

Building for Sustainability: Strategies of Better Living

Mark Levine, Director
Environmental Energy Technologies Division
Founder, China Energy Group
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
University of California, Berkeley
Berkeley, CA US

William Jackson, Research and Development Leader
The Dow Chemical Company
Midland, MI US

Da Yan, Associate Professor
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Strategies for Sustainable Transportation: The Role of National Policy

Robert L. Bertini, Deputy Administrator
Director, Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office
Research and Innovative Technology Administration
U.S. Department of Transportation
Washington, D.C. US

Feng Fei, Director-General
Department of Industrial Economics Research
Development Research Center
The State Council of the People's Republic of China
Beijing, China

Peter F. Sweatman, Director
Transportation Research Institute
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

Coal-Based Options for Energy Generation: Strategies for the Next Thirty Years

Ningsheng Cai, Professor
Department of Thermal Engineering
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Jerald J. Fletcher, Director
Natural Resources Analysis Center
West Virginia University
Morgantown, WV US

Robert H. Williams, Senior Research Scientist
Princeton Environmental Institute
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ US

Integrated Water Systems - From Watershed to the Tap

Ximing Cai, Vent T. Chow Faculty Scholar and Associate Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana, IL US

Chunmiao Zheng, Professor
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Alabama
Chair Professor of Water Resources
Peking University
Peking, China

Use of Waterfootprinting and Other Stewardship Tools to Enable Policy

Peter Adriaens, Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

J. Paul Ganter, Co-Founder and Director
Circle of Blue
Traverse City, MI US

Wendy Larson, Senior Scientist
Limno-Tech, Inc.
Ann Arbor, MI US

John T. Peichel, Global Product Manager
GE Water & Process Technologies
Minnetonka, MN US

Guoping Zhang, Project Manager
Water Footprint Network
c/o University of Twente
The Netherlands

Delivering on the Promise of Sustainability - The Challenge for 21st Century Business

Xiangli Chen, General Manager
GE China Technology Center
Shanghai, China

Xiaojian You, Chair
China Social Innovation Foundation
Senior Manager, Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise
Johnson School of Management, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY US

Gabe Wing, Manager
Design for the Environment
Environmental Health and Safety
Herman Miller, Inc.

Yumei Dong, Division Chief of Development
Beijing Central Business District Administration Committee
Beijing, China

Power and Water? Competitive Needs from our Dams

Wang Hao, Director
Water Resources Research Center
China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research
Beijing, China

Patricia Mulroy, General Manager
Las Vegas Valley Water District
Southern Nevada Water Authority
Las Vegas, NV US

The Role of Safety in Sustainable Transportation

Qiu Shaobo, Technical Director
Vehicle Safety
China FAW Group Corporation
China

Wei Zhang, Professor of Industrial Engineering
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Jim Noble, Line of Business Director - Motor Fleet
Zurich Services Corporation
Schaumburg, IL US

Michael Sivak, Director
Human Factors Group
Transportation Research Institute
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

Pollution Control – Progress in China and the United States

Shu Tao, Professor
College of Urban and Environmental Sciences
Peking University

Posted by zzhu at 02:57 PM

Free concert in Mandarin Chinese and Taiwanese dialects

慶祝北美地區台灣傳統週 Amazing Taiwan Music Culture Tour on May 9, 2011 in Farmington Hills

董事長樂團 (The Chairman 台語歌, 國語歌): 黄連煜 (Ayugo 客家歌), 安韻澐 (Yangui Yasiyungu 山地歌) , 舒米恩 (Suming 山地歌), 何欣惠 (Ciacia山地歌)

表演時間 (Time): May 9th, 2011, 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm, Free and open to the public. (admission ticket required for entry - please contact Ms. Yen-ling von Meister at zhoulaoshi88[at]gmail[dot]com for tickets)

表演地點 (Place): Smith Theater, Oakland Community College
27055 Orchard Lake Road, Farmington Hills, MI 48334
(South of Hong Hua Chinese Restaurant)

Posted by zzhu at 02:54 PM

April 13, 2011

Position at Sotheby's: Chinese Works of Art Specialist

Sotheby's is currently looking for a Chinese Works of Art Specialist (based in New York) with at least 5 years of work experience and Mandarin oral and written skills.

Job Description
Job Title: Specialist
Department: Chinese Works of Art
Reporting To: Caroline Schulten and Christina Prescott-Walker

Position Summary
Working as a Specialist in the Chinese Works of Art department in New York focusing on all aspects of the auction process including expertise, business-getting and client development.

Responsibilities
• Responsibility for the cataloguing process in the department; working with the other members of the department to ensure the sale is properly researched and catalogued. Duties include catalogue production, layout and design as well as writing catalogue notes and condition reports
• Negotiate sale terms, explain auction procedures and provide seamless service to clients throughout auction process.
• Assisting with the sourcing of consignments by evaluating and appraising Works of Art for estimate requests, walk-in appointments and trade clients. Provide estimates and work with Senior Specialists as appropriate to confirm evaluations and maintain close follow-up on property that has been estimated but not yet consigned for sale.
• Assist with exhibition set up
• Work with all specialists to sell the sale by helping clients at the exhibition; speaking to clients about the property; develop, track and communicate client interest in lots; and execute bids at sale
• Evaluate client’s property at Sotheby’s and at client locations, including participation in full valuation projects
• Working proactively on client development - actively managing client relationships for Sotheby’s in order to enhance client loyalty and generate business

Qualifications
• Expertise and experience of the Chinese Works of Art market with at least 5 years work experience, ideally within the auction business
• Knowledge of both written and oral Mandarin Chinese is preferred
• Self starter
• A team player with excellent communication skills
• Thorough, focused, with a passion and commitment to the field
• Professional and discreet client service skills
• Excellent writing and organizational skills
• Ability to maintain composure in a stressful environment and meet constant deadlines
• Strong multi-tasker

Posted by zzhu at 11:48 PM

The 17th Annual North American Taiwan Studies Association Annual Conference

The Trajectory of Taiwan in a Global Context

June 17-18, 2011

Frick Fine Art Building,
University of Pittsburgh

Themes:
I) Responding to Crises and Challenges: Rethinking the Concept of State and Government
II) The Global Footprint of the Taiwanese People and the Boundaries of Taiwanese Society: Description and Critique
III) National Political Agenda for the 21st Century: Assuring Social Fairness, Environmental Integrity, Food Safety, and Healthcare Quality
IV) Culture and Political Economy: Symbol, Capital, and Power
V) Cross-strait Relations in the Making: Adding New Dimensions to an Old Debate

Special Workshop:
The Vision of Taiwan Studies: Meeting the Next Generation of Taiwanese Historians, Geographers, Anthropologists, and Scholars from Film Studies

Organizer:
North American Taiwan Studies Association (NATSA)

Co-sponsor:
Asian Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh

Registration information can be found at http://www.na-tsa.org/new/.

Posted by zzhu at 11:42 PM

April 12, 2011

NYU in Shanghai is hiring!

Position Summary
NYU Shanghai, a new campus of NYU under development, and slated to open in the Pudong District of Shanghai, China during September of 2013, is seeking a translator and events administrator. This individual will serve as lead interpreter and translator for all types of communication to and from Chinese and English. Working independently, this individual will also ensure that NYU in Shanghai's New York City office needs and goals are met by organizing events, planning meetings, managing small projects, and contributing to the image and functioning of the office. The preferred candidate will have a professional demeanor, experienced at and capable of interacting appropriately with visiting dignitaries and delegations. The candidate must be capable of fluent translation between Chinese and English and between English and Chinese, both orally and in writing. The role will be based in New York at NYU's main campus.

Qualifications/Required Education
Bachelor's degree

Required Experience
Experience providing fluent translation between Chinese and English and between English and Chinese, both orally and in writing. Experience planning and implementing events and activities, interacting with vendors, and managing small projects.

Preferred Experience
Simultaneous translation experience a plus, but not required.

Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities
Candidate must have excellent organization, interpersonal, and problem solving skills. Ability to communicate policies and procedures to a diverse population at all levels. Be capable of fluent translation both between Chinese and English and between English and Chinese; both orally and in writing. Have a thorough understanding of American and Chinese cultural nuances. Strong customer service skills. Strong and professional interpersonal and verbal and written communication skills. Competent writer, capable of drafting professional and nuanced correspondence. Proven ability to manage multiple contacts / touch points for multiple inquiries at a given time. Excellent planning, analytical and problem solving skills. Effective people management and negotiation skills and ability to work effectively on cross-functional teams. Have prior experience participating in team efforts on complex, collaborative projects. Capable of and accustomed to work well under pressure. Capable of prioritizing and remaining organized in an active and multi-tasking environment. Professional demeanor; comfort interacting and communicating with all levels. Excellent judgment, discretion, tact and ability to maintain confidences are essential. Advanced proficiency with word processing and spreadsheet applications (Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint), and basic scheduling software.

Web link
www.nyucareers.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=53213

Posted by zzhu at 10:53 PM

Job posting - Coordinator, Year of China, Brown University

Position Summary
Position will provide administrative support to the Year of China initiative. Will work with a wide range of people and offices at Brown to organize and coordinate many activities, ranging from small, informal gatherings to high-profile speaking events. The position will serve as a resource for all information pertaining to the Year of China, and will be responsible for producing publicity materials, promoting attendance at events, writing articles and keeping the website fresh and vibrant.

Will be responsible for organizing and managing student volunteers.

Job Qualifications
Must have strong organizational skills and ability to attend to details. This position requires the ability to interact effectively with students, faculty and a wide spectrum of visitors. Strong writing and communication skills are essential. Understanding of Brown's internal procedures and policies very helpful; knowledge of China and Greater China helpful but not necessary.

https://careers.brown.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=117149

Posted by zzhu at 10:42 PM

April 08, 2011

A tribute to Shakespeare from Taiwan Bangzi Opera!


Bookmark and Share

“BOND” – a Taiwan Bangzi Opera adaption of “The Merchant of Venice” 豫莎劇 – 《約/束》
Starring Hai-ling Wang, Diva of Taiwan Bangzi Opera, and Mei-li Chu, Ya-ling Hsiao, and Chien-hua Liu

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 | 7pm
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
University of Michigan
911 North University, Ann Arbor, MI

Audience members are advised of the following:
- English and Chinese subtitles will be provided.
- There is no intermission; a Q&A session will immediately follow the performance.
- This special performance is free and open to the public. Seats are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. University policy limiting the size of the audience to the number of seats available will be strictly enforced.
- This performance is not recommended for children under the age of ten.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Related events (also free and open to the public):

Bangzi Family Night 親子活動: Fun for all ages – demonstration-lecture on the best of Chinese opera, video screenings of four essential opera roles that will appear in the performance, and brief opera lessons on body movement and martial arts!
Date/Time: Sunday, April 10, 2011 | 7pm
Location: Auditorium A, Angell Hall, U-M Central Campus (enter via glass doors at fishbowl, off diag), Ann Arbor

Bangzi Opera Workshop 豫劇工作坊: Members of Taiwanese Bangzi Company and academics of the genre will provide an insightful introduction to this type of traditional Chinese opera. Live performances will surely brighten the workday!
Date/Time: Monday, April 11, 2011 | 12noon
Location: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University (corner of South U. and East U.), Ann Arbor

All three events are sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan, with support from U-M Department of English and Comparative Literature's Year of Comparison. Special thanks to members of the Taiwanese American community of Ann Arbor and Greater Detroit for their dedicated assistance.


Relate lecture: Monday April 11, 4:00pm, 3222 Angell Hall

Speaker: Alexander Huang, Penn State University

Title: Global Shakespeares 2.0: Digital Humanities Today

Abstract:
The age of global Shakespeare 2.0 has arrived. It is an age in which Shakespearean performance is shaped by its self-referentiality and inter-media citational strategies. "Shakespeare" fosters friendly associations and hostile confrontations with equal force. This illustrated presentation will explore how the digital video archive can decouple Shakespearean text and performance in ideological formations and re-join them as open sites where negotiations of meanings take place. A world increasingly driven by market economy rather than ideological difference has led to the coexistence and confluence of multiple manifestations of Shakespeare.

Speaker Bio:
Alexander Huang is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Penn State University, Research Affiliate in Literature at MIT, the general editor of *The Shakespearean International Yearbook*, early modern studies faculty of the Middlebury College Bread Loaf School of English, and the Vice President of the Association for Asian Performance.

One of his recent books, *Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange* (published by Columbia University Press), received the MLA's Scaglione Prize and an honorable mention of NYU's Joe A. Callaway Prize for the Best Book on Drama and Theatre.

As the co-founder and co-editor of *Global Shakespeares*, an open-access digital video archive based at MIT, he was the video curator of an exhibition on early modern and postmodern Sino-European cultural exchange at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. His research has been sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), International Shakespeare Association (ISA), the Folger Institute, and other organizations.

Posted by zzhu at 04:11 PM

April 07, 2011

Bangzi-related events


Bookmark and Share

The following events are part of a series of activities built around “BOND” – a Taiwan Bangzi Opera adaption of “The Merchant of Venice” 豫莎劇 – 《約/束》

Bangzi Family Night 親子活動: Fun for all ages – demonstration-lecture on the best of Chinese opera, video screenings of four essential opera roles that will appear in the performance, and brief opera lessons on body movement and martial arts!
Date/Time: Sunday, April 10, 2011 | 7pm
Location: Auditorium A, Angell Hall, U-M Central Campus (enter via glass doors at fishbowl, off diag), Ann Arbor

Bangzi Opera Workshop 豫劇工作坊: Members of Taiwanese Bangzi Company and academics of the genre will provide an insightful introduction to this type of traditional Chinese opera. Live performances will surely brighten the workday!
Date/Time: Monday, April 11, 2011 | 12noon
Location: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University (corner of South U. and East U.), Ann Arbor

All the Bangzi events are sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan, with support from U-M Department of English and Comparative Literature's Year of Comparison. Special thanks to members of the Taiwanese American community of Ann Arbor and Greater Detroit for their dedicated assistance.

Posted by zzhu at 10:17 PM

April 06, 2011

CCS faculty associate Bright Sheng to guest-conduct concert by the Adrian Symphony Orchestra

Heroic Voices

Classical Concert
Saturday, April 16 • 8 pm
Dawson Auditorium, Adrian College
110 S. Madison St.
Adrian, MI 49221
Guest conductor: Bright Sheng, Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Respected as one of the foremost composers of our time, Bright Sheng guest-conducts his Postcards, with John Thomas Dodson concluding the ASO’s Classical Series with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3, Eroica.

Posted by zzhu at 10:47 PM

April 05, 2011

Professor Christian de Pee's AAS blog


Bookmark and Share


Professor Christian de Pee, U-M Department of History, shares his experience from the Joint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and International Convention of Asia Scholars in Honolulu. We are grateful for his time and attention.


Thursday, March 31:

Trickles of scholars flowed westward from the Eastern Seaboard and the Midwest, collecting in more substantial streams in California for the journey across the Pacific to Hawai’i—and some of these trickling streams were Blue: at Wayne County International Airport, I encountered fellow CCS members Pär Cassel, Ellen Laing, and Shuen-fu Lin, and in Los Angeles we were joined by Gang Liu (Rackham 2010) and Deborah Solomon (Rackham 2009). The shuttle bus from the airport was full of scholars of Asia, leafing through their programs and catching up with colleagues from distant places. But as the bus emptied its contents into the hotel lobbies of Waikiki, the scholars disappeared among vacationing families and sunburned tourists, amid leis, souvenirs, and surfboards.

Friday, April 1:

Some fifty scholars gathered at 10:15 a.m. to attend the panel “Metropologies: Imperial Cities and Literary Form in China,” conceived by Benjamin Ridgway (Rackham 2005) and Gang Liu. Shuen-fu Lin provided introductions, and four presenters each gave a concise analysis of the representation of an imperial city in one distinct literary genre: Michael Nylan (UC Berkeley) analyzed Chang’an during the late Western Han (206 BCE-9 CE) as it emerges from memorials to the throne; Linda Feng (University of Toronto) pointed to the commercial pageantry surrounding the imperial examinations in Chang’an, visible in the margins of informal prose works of the Tang dynasty (618-907); Benjamin Ridgway (Valparaiso University) examined the literary and discursive politics of Wang Shipeng’s rhapsodies on Shaoxing, the spurned temporary capital of the Southern Song (1127-1279); and Gang Liu (Carnegie Mellon University) spoke about the combination of nostalgia and criticism in accounts of Hangzhou, in notebooks written during the Yuan dynasty (1271-1368). After I offered some brief, general remarks about the relationship between urban space and literary form, and proposed some specific ways in which a semiotic approach to generic conventions might strengthen the argument of the individual papers, members of the audience contributed their insights and questions. Discussions continued in the hallway of the convention center, until the members of the panel descended the escalators and crossed the street for a celebratory luncheon at a Korean restaurant.

Saturday, April 2:

At 8:00 a.m. I met with a dear friend who had invited me to join her on a visit to the Hawai’ian estate of the late Doris Duke, which is managed by the Honolulu Academy of Arts. In the company of a guide and a small tour group we wondered at the combination of Islamic antiques, nineteenth-century Near Eastern crafts, and twentieth-century American imitations of Islamic patterns and techniques that decorate this idiosyncratic piece of 1930s architecture, situated on a bluff amid landscaped gardens. And we admired the view of the ocean, stretching under a blue, wind-swept sky beyond the sliding windows and hydraulic façade of the living room and below the colonnaded terrace.

Back at the convention center in the afternoon, I attended a meeting and a panel, and sought opportunities for the random encounters that are the most enjoyable and often the most valuable part of these professional conferences. Where else does one meet in one place former teachers and former fellow students, old acquaintances made at a seminar in Europe or at a research institute in China, and esteemed colleagues from across the world? It is not uncommon that one walks up to a group of friends who introduce one (“Oh, do you know each other?”) to an unfamiliar person who turns out to be the author of an admired monograph, or whom one knows from an instructive electronic correspondence. And so I reminisced about a sojourn in Chengdu, shared insights with graduate students pursuing work parallel to my own, discussed work in progress with a variety of peers, repeated old jokes with a former colleague, and shared with a few friends a bottle of Michigan sparkling wine that I had brought to celebrate the recent approval of my tenure file by the College.

Sunday, April 3:

On Sunday the conference gradually ebbed away. Booksellers sold their display copies, panels became more sparsely attended, and scholars with hurried step (their forgotten name tag flapping) rolled their well-traveled suitcases toward buses and taxis. Some confessed that they had not yet overcome their jet lag as they prepared to return to California, to Ohio, to Europe. And just as suddenly as this community of Asian scholars had gathered in academic debate and lively conversations, so it dispersed into the dark, humid skies above Honolulu International Airport.

Posted by zzhu at 01:08 PM