April 05, 2014

The Struggle of Memory Against Forgetting: Tiananmen 25 Years On - Film Screening


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Free and open to the public.

The Gate of Heavenly Peace
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
Saturday, April 12, 2014
6pm-9pm ~ Film screening
9pm ~ Student-led discussion and Reception

During the spring of 1989, nightly news accounts filmed in Tiananmen Square in Beijing enthralled viewers worldwide as they watched the largest popular demonstration in modern Chinese history unfold. The Gate of Heavenly Peace, a riveting and explosive three hour documentary, revisits these events and explores the complex political process that led to the protests and eventual Beijing massacre of June 4, 1989.

The Gate of Heavenly Peace was directed by Carma Hinton, who was born and raised in China, and Richard Gordon, who has been involved with many films about China as a director, producer of cinematographer. With an international group of scholars, as well as participants in the events of 1989, the filmmakers spent six years investigating this important and intriguing story.

Directed by Carma Hinton and Richard Gordon; USA, 1995; 180 minutes

Posted by zzhu at 06:25 PM

The Struggle of Memory Against Forgetting: Tiananmen 25 Years On - Poetry Reading


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Yang Lian 杨炼 - "1989"
Stern Auditorium, University of Michigan Museum of Art
Monday, April 14, 2014
6pm: Reception ~ UMMA Commons Area
7pm: Poetry Reading ~ UMMA Stern Auditorium

Yang Lian was born in Bern (Switzerland) in 1955, where his parents were in the diplomatic service, and grew up in Beijing. Like millions of other young people, he was sent to the countryside for re-education during the final years of the Cultural Revolution. After the death of his mother in 1976, Yang began to write poetry. Back in Beijing, as one of the leading experimental poets, he was associated with the underground literary periodical Jintian (Today).

Yang Lian is best known as a poet, but he also writes prose, literary criticism and art criticism. His work, which comprises half a score of poetry collections and two volumes of prose, has been translated into over twenty languages. It includes: Dead in Exile (1989), Masks & Crocodile (1990), Non-person Singular (1995), Yi (2002), Notes of a Blissful Ghost (2002) and Concentric Circles (2006). He is regarded as one of the most representative voices of present-day Chinese literature.

A recent passion and project of Yang Lian is to encourage the production and translation of poetry written in dialects of Chinese: Sichuan dialect, Shanghainese and Beijing dialect. There is currently no vehicle for writing poetry in these languages since Chinese orthography supports Mandarin only. Yang has been closely involved with a collective of Slovenian poets who, despite the small population of their country, support poetic production in nine Slovene dialects. He is currently working with Kelly Askew (U-M) and a formerly exiled Kenyan poet, Abdilatif Abdalla, on translating poetry composed in various dialects of Swahili into English and from English into dialect forms of Chinese. The idea is ultimately to produce a volume on ‘dialect poetry’, written in the shadows of dominant, politically powerful, languages (Mandarin and Standardized Swahili being but two examples).

Organized by the African Studies Center and co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, the International Institute, and the Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan.

Posted by zzhu at 08:32 AM

The Struggle of Memory Against Forgetting: Tiananmen 25 Years On - Panel Discussion


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Stern Auditorium, University of Michigan Museum of Art
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
6pm: Reception ~ UMMA Commons Area
7pm: Panel Discussion ~ UMMA Stern Auditorium

The final event of the week is a panel discussion with NPR journalist and 2014 Knight-Wallace Fellow Louisa Lim, UC-Irvine historian Jeff Wasserstrom who has written extensively on Chinese student protests and related topics, and Professor Wang Zheng of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the UM History Department, an expert on modern Chinese history and gender politics. The panelists will discuss current research on the Tiananmen Movement, how the movement is remembered in and outside of China today, and the ways in which student activism have changed since 1989. The discussion will incorporate questions from the audience and will be moderated by CCS Director Mary Gallagher.

Louisa Lim has spent ten years in China, currently as NPR’s Beijing correspondent, and prior to that as the BBC’s Beijing correspondent. She has won numerous awards for her radio and multimedia work, and was part of NPR teams that won a Peabody, an Alfred I Dupont-Columbia award and two Edward R. Murrow awards for their China coverage. Currently she is a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan. Her book “The People's Republic of Amnesia" will be published by Oxford University Press (USA) in June 2014.

Wang Zheng is Associate Professor of History and Women’s Studies and Associate Scientist of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. A graduate student at the University of California, Davis 25 years ago, she took donations from the UC students to Chinese students at the Tiananmen Square. Her experience in Beijing in 1989 turned her a committed academic activist promoting feminism in China. She is the founder and co-director of the UM-Fudan Joint Institute for Gender Studies at Fudan University, Shanghai. Her English publications concern changing gender discourses and relations in China's socioeconomic, political and cultural transformations of the past century, and feminism in China, both in terms of its historical development and its contemporary activism in the context of globalization. She is the author of Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories (UC Press, 1999).

Jeffrey Wasserstrom is Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine, the Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies, and a frequent contributor to newspapers and magazines. He is the author of China in the 21stCentury: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2010, updated edition 2013) and served as a consultant for "The Gate of Heavenly Peace," an award-winning documentary on the events of 1989.

Mary Gallagher is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, where she is also the Director of the Center for Chinese Studies, and a faculty associate at the Center for Comparative Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research. Her research areas are Chinese politics, comparative politics of transitional and developing states, and law and society. Her book Contagious Capitalism: Globalization and the Politics of Labor in China was published by Princeton University Press in 2005.

Posted by zzhu at 07:36 AM

April 04, 2014

The Struggle of Memory Against Forgetting: Tiananmen 25 Years On


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All events are free and open to the public.

Film screening: The Gate of Heavenly Peace
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
Saturday, April 12, 2014
6 - 9pm ~ Film screening
9pm ~ Student-led discussion and Reception

During the spring of 1989, nightly news accounts filmed in Tiananmen Square in Beijing enthralled viewers worldwide as they watched the largest popular demonstration in modern Chinese history unfold. The Gate of Heavenly Peace, a riveting and explosive three hour documentary, revisits these events and explores the complex political process that led to the protests and eventual Beijing massacre of June 4, 1989.

The Gate of Heavenly Peace was directed by Carma Hinton, who was born and raised in China, and Richard Gordon, who has been involved with many films about China as a director, producer of cinematographer. With an international group of scholars, as well as participants in the events of 1989, the filmmakers spent six years investigating this important and intriguing story.

Directed by Carma Hinton and Richard Gordon; USA, 1995; 180 minutes

Poetry Reading: Yang Lian 杨炼 - "1989"
Stern Auditorium, University of Michigan Museum of Art
Monday, April 14, 2014
6pm: Reception ~ UMMA Commons Area
7pm: Poetry Reading ~ UMMA Stern Auditorium

Yang Lian was born in Bern (Switzerland) in 1955, where his parents were in the diplomatic service, and grew up in Beijing. Like millions of other young people, he was sent to the countryside for re-education during the final years of the Cultural Revolution. After the death of his mother in 1976, Yang began to write poetry. Back in Beijing, as one of the leading experimental poets, he was associated with the underground literary periodical Jintian (Today).

Yang Lian is best known as a poet, but he also writes prose, literary criticism and art criticism. His work, which comprises half a score of poetry collections and two volumes of prose, has been translated into over twenty languages. It includes: Dead in Exile (1989), Masks & Crocodile (1990), Non-person Singular (1995), Yi (2002), Notes of a Blissful Ghost (2002) and Concentric Circles (2006). He is regarded as one of the most representative voices of present-day Chinese literature.

A recent passion and project of Yang Lian is to encourage the production and translation of poetry written in dialects of Chinese: Sichuan dialect, Shanghainese and Beijing dialect. There is currently no vehicle for writing poetry in these languages since Chinese orthography supports Mandarin only. Yang has been closely involved with a collective of Slovenian poets who, despite the small population of their country, support poetic production in nine Slovene dialects. He is currently working with Kelly Askew (U-M) and a formerly exiled Kenyan poet, Abdilatif Abdalla, on translating poetry composed in various dialects of Swahili into English and from English into dialect forms of Chinese. The idea is ultimately to produce a volume on ‘dialect poetry’, written in the shadows of dominant, politically powerful, languages (Mandarin and Standardized Swahili being but two examples).

Organized by the African Studies Center and co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, the International Institute, and the Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan.

Panel Discussion
Stern Auditorium, University of Michigan Museum of Art
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
6pm: Reception ~ UMMA Commons Area
7pm: Panel Discussion ~ UMMA Stern Auditorium

The final event of the week is a panel discussion with NPR journalist and 2014 Knight-Wallace Fellow Louisa Lim, UC-Irvine historian Jeff Wasserstrom who has written extensively on Chinese student protests and related topics, and Professor Wang Zheng of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the UM History Department, an expert on modern Chinese history and gender politics. The panelists will discuss current research on the Tiananmen Movement, how the movement is remembered in and outside of China today, and the ways in which student activism have changed since 1989. The discussion will incorporate questions from the audience and will be moderated by CCS Director Mary Gallagher.

Louisa Lim has spent ten years in China, currently as NPR’s Beijing correspondent, and prior to that as the BBC’s Beijing correspondent. She has won numerous awards for her radio and multimedia work, and was part of NPR teams that won a Peabody, an Alfred I Dupont-Columbia award and two Edward R. Murrow awards for their China coverage. Currently she is a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan. Her book “The People's Republic of Amnesia" will be published by Oxford University Press (USA) in June 2014.

Wang Zheng is Associate Professor of History and Women’s Studies and Associate Scientist of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. A graduate student at the University of California, Davis 25 years ago, she took donations from the UC students to Chinese students at the Tiananmen Square. Her experience in Beijing in 1989 turned her a committed academic activist promoting feminism in China. She is the founder and co-director of the UM-Fudan Joint Institute for Gender Studies at Fudan University, Shanghai. Her English publications concern changing gender discourses and relations in China's socioeconomic, political and cultural transformations of the past century, and feminism in China, both in terms of its historical development and its contemporary activism in the context of globalization. She is the author of Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories (UC Press, 1999).

Jeffrey Wasserstrom is Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine, the Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies, and a frequent contributor to newspapers and magazines. He is the author of China in the 21stCentury: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2010, updated edition 2013) and served as a consultant for "The Gate of Heavenly Peace," an award-winning documentary on the events of 1989.

Mary Gallagher is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, where she is also the Director of the Center for Chinese Studies, and a faculty associate at the Center for Comparative Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research. Her research areas are Chinese politics, comparative politics of transitional and developing states, and law and society. Her book Contagious Capitalism: Globalization and the Politics of Labor in China was published by Princeton University Press in 2005.

Posted by zzhu at 04:04 PM

February 18, 2014

Chinese Dance Public Performance: Chinese Sword and Sleeve Dance


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Free and open to the public ~

This is the closing event for the two-week dance residency. A public performance by participants in the community workshop series will be followed by demonstrations by the guest artists and short Q&A discussion with residency participants and organizers. A guest performance will also be included by the UM Moli Chinese Dance Company. The event will follow with a reception for all participants.

Date: Friday, February 21, 2014
Time: 5:00pm-7:00pm
Location: Betty Pease Studio Theatre (Department of Dance Studio) - see link below for location on map:
http://campusinfo.umich.edu/building-search/building/46/dance-building

Shao Weiqiu
Associate Professor of Chinese Classical Dance
Beijing Dance Academy

Zhang Jun
Professor of Chinese Classical Dance
Beijing Dance Academy

Emily Wilcox
Assistant Professor of Chinese Culture
U-M Dept. of Asian Languages and Cultures

Posted by zzhu at 11:03 PM

February 07, 2014

Movement Aesthetics in Chinese Classical Sword and Water Sleeve – A Performance Conversation with Guest Artists From the Beijing Dance Academy


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Date: Monday, February 10, 2014
Time: 4pm-5:30pm
Location: Educational Conference Center Room, 1840 School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University

Part of the Chinese Classical Dance Master Class Residency, Professors Shao Weiqiu (邵未秋) and Zhang Jun (张军) will introduce important aesthetic dimensions of Chinese sword and water sleeve dance and discuss their connections with martial arts and Chinese indigenous theatre (xiqu). The guest artists will provide performance demonstrations using the sword and water sleeve, and audience members will have a chance to try out some of the movements themselves. The event will be introduced and moderated by CCS faculty associate Emily Wilcox, who is currently writing a book about the history and aesthetics of Chinese classical dance.

Sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies.

Posted by zzhu at 12:24 AM

January 29, 2014

Chinese Dance Residency public events


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Chinese Classical Dance Master Class Residency with Visiting Artists from the Beijing Dance Academy
北京舞蹈学院的中国古典舞身韵研究(剑、水袖)—— 讲座和大师工作坊

February 7-21, 2014
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
Shao Weiqiu 邵未秋 is Professor of Chinese Classical Dance at the Beijing Dance Academy. She is author of 中国古典舞袖舞教程 (Teaching Program for Chinese Classical Dance Sleeve Dance, 2004).

Zhang Jun 张军 is Professor of Chinese Classical Dance at the Beijing Dance Academy. He is author of 研剑习舞——中国古典舞剑舞集 (Research Sword, Study Dance: Collection of Chinese Classical Dance Sword Dance, 2012).

OPENING EVENT LECTURE AND MASTER CLASS
Movement Aesthetics in Chinese Classical Sword and Water Sleeve Dance – Lecture by Dr. Emily Wilcox (UM) and Master Class with Guest Artists From the Beijing Dance Academy
Date: Friday, February 7, 2014
Time: 4:00-7:00pm
Location: East Room, Pierpont Commons (North Campus)

This is the opening event for a two-week Chinese Dance residency with Guest Artists from the Beijing Dance Academy Shao Weiqiu and Zhang Jun, two of China’s foremost experts in Chinese classical sword and water sleeve dance. The event will open with a lecture by UM faculty Emily Wilcox introducing the history and aesthetic features of Chinese classical sword and water sleeve dance. This will be followed by hands-on workshops introducing basic techniques in Chinese Classical Sword and Sleeve Dance, in which all participants will have a chance to try out these movement forms. Finally, Professors Shao, Zhang, and Wilcox will engage in a moderated discussion on Chinese movement aesthetics, in which participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and reflect on the process of working with Chinese movement techniques and props.

*This event is hosted by the UM Confucius Institute.

JAVANESE PERFORMANCE RESIDENCY JOINT EVENT
Contemporary Traditions in Dialogue: Workshop on Chinese and Javanese Stage Movement
Date: Saturday, Feb 8, 2014
Time: 4:00-6:00pm
Location: Michigan Room, Michigan League (2nd floor)

This event will feature roundtable discussion with the two Chinese classical dance artists in residence, as well as practitioners in Javanese classical dance and Javanese puppet theatre (wayang). Participants include famed Javanese shadow theater master and gamelan teacher Midiyanto (aka “Mas Midi”) and local Javanese dance artist Theresa Rohlck. Midiyanto is a Lecturer in Indonesian Gamelan at the University of California, Berkeley, and is currently in residence at the University of Michigan Center for World Performance Studies. Theresa Rohlck is a practitioner of Javanese dance trained in Jogjakarta, Java. She teaches at the English Language Institute at the University of Michigan and frequently performs as a guest artist with the University of Michigan gamelan. Themes to be discussed include the use of props and costumes in Chinese and Javanese dance, the use of stylized movement to tell stories and create characters, and the construction and transformation of “classical” performance traditions in modern China and Indonesia.

*This event is presented with support from the UM Center for World Performance Studies, the Residential College, the Center for Southeast Asian Studies and Arts at Michigan.

PANEL DISCUSSION AND DEMONSTRATIONS
Movement Aesthetics in Chinese Classical Sword and Water Sleeve – A Performance Conversation with Guest Artists From the Beijing Dance Academy
Date: Monday, Feb 10, 2014
Time: 4:00-5:30
Location: Educational Conference Center Room, 1840 School of Social Work

Professors Shao and Zhang will introduce important aesthetic dimensions of Chinese sword and water sleeve dance and discuss their connections with martial arts and Chinese indigenous theatre (xiqu). The guest artists will provide performance demonstrations using the sword and water sleeve, and audience members will have a chance to try out some of the movements themselves. The event will be introduced and moderated by CCS faculty affiliate Emily Wilcox, who is currently writing a book about the history and aesthetics of Chinese classical dance.

*This event is hosted by the UM Center for Chinese Studies.

COMMUNITY WORKSHOP SERIES
The Chinese Dance Residency will include a two-week community workshop series that is free and open to the public, which will take place at various locations on Central Campus at 7:00pm to 9:00pm, Monday-Friday on Feb 10-20th (5:00pm-7:00pm on February 14th only). Participants must commit to attending the entire workshop series, including a public performance and reception at 5:00-7:00pm on the evening of Friday, Feb 21st. Observers are welcome. Places for the community workshop series are limited, and all props will be provided; interested individuals should contact Emily Wilcox at eewilcox[at]umich[dot]edu to reserve a place and find out the detailed location information.

DANCE ON FILM SCREENING
Date: Monday, February 17th, 2014
Time: 4:00-6:00pm
Location: B830 East Quadrangle.

This event is a full public screening of the 1959 Chinese dance film Precious Lotus Lantern (Bao Lian Deng 宝莲灯), widely considered to be the first full-length narrative work of modern Chinese classical dance. The screening will be followed by a question and answer session and discussion.

*This event is organized in conjunction with Arts and Ideas, World Dance, Residential College.

CLOSING EVENT PERFORMANCE AND FAREWELL RECEPTION
Date: Friday, February 21st, 2014
Time: 5:00-7:00pm
Location: Betty Pease Studio Theatre (Department of Dance Studio A)

This is the closing event for the two-week dance residency. A public performance by participants in the community workshop series will be followed by demonstrations by the guest artists and short Q&A discussion with residency participants and organizers. A guest performance will also be included by the UM Moli Chinese Dance Company. The event will follow with a reception for all participants.

Posted by zzhu at 01:20 PM

December 05, 2013

Xi Jinping's Strategy and Prospects

Speaker: Kenneth Lieberthal, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, John L. Thornton China Center, The Brookings Institution
Date: Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Time: 2:00PM
Location: Room 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University
Free and open to the public.

Posted by zzhu at 04:00 PM

November 21, 2013

Book event - In Line Behind a Billion People: How Scarcity Will Define China's Ascent


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Damien Ma (CCS MA '06) will discuss his new book (co-authored with William Adams). Copies of the book will be available for purchase during the reception after the lecture. Damien will be available to sign any purchased books at the event.

Tuesday, December 3, 2013 @5pm
Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University, Ann Arbor
Copies of the book can be purchased and signed by the author during the reception, which will immediately follow the book discussion.
Book discussion and reception are free and open to the public.

Damien Ma and William Adams' recent New York Times op-ed:
If You Think China’s Air Is Bad...

Nearly everything you know about China is wrong! Yes, within a decade, China will have the world’s largest economy. But that is the least important thing to know about China. In this enlightening book, two of the world’s leading China experts turn the conventional wisdom on its head, showing why China’s economic growth will constrain rather than empower it. Pioneering political analyst Damien Ma and global economist Bill Adams reveal why, having 35 years of ferocious economic growth, China’s future will be shaped by the same fundamental reality that has shaped it for millennia: scarcity. Ma and Adams drill deep into Chinese society, illuminating all the scarcities that will limit its power and progress. Beyond scarcities of natural resources and public goods, they illuminate China’s persistent poverties of individual freedoms, cultural appeal, and ideological legitimacy — and the corrosive loss of values and beliefs amongst a growing middle class shackled by a parochial and inflexible political system. Everyone knows “the 21st century is China’s to lose” — but, as with so many things that “everyone knows,” that’s just wrong. Ma and Adams get beyond cheerleading and fearmongering to tell the complex truth about China today. This is a truth you need to hear — whether you’re an investor, business decision-maker, policymaker, or citizen.

Posted by zzhu at 11:36 PM

October 17, 2013

CCS Annual Conference 2013: Socialist Culture in China Reconsidered


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Socialist Culture in China Reconsidered
October 25 & 26, 2013
The Founders Rooms of the U-M Alumni Center
200 Fletcher Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

The second event since the inception of the CCS Annual Conference in 2012, this international conference will provide a platform for scholars to examine multiple dimensions of socialist cultural production in twentieth-century China. It is organized by Xiaobing Tang, Helmut F. Stern Professor in Modern Chinese Studies and a faculty member of CCS.

Participants from across the US, China, Canada, Germany as well as New Zealand will present their current research on many topics and objects, ranging from film to dance to literature and visual arts. They will look into the various institutions, theories, practices, models, and global connections that sustained cultural production of the socialist era, a time period far more extended than the decade of the Cultural Revolution. The goal is to gain a better understanding of not only a highly complex and experimental period of history, but also the competing forces shaping contemporary Chinese society and culture.

The event is open and free to the public. Please click here for more information including registration.

Posted by zzhu at 11:56 AM

September 19, 2013

Lecture by CCS alumnus Andrew Mertha: Brothers in Arms: Chinese Aid to the Khmer Rouge, 1975-1979

Speaker: Andrew Mertha (PhD '01, Political Science), professor of government, Cornell University
Host Department: Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS)
Co-hosted by: CCS
Date: 09/27/2013
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Location: International Institute-Room 1636

Description:
Beijing's extensive engagement with the developing world suggests an inexorably rising China, securing a degree of economic and political dominance unthinkable a decade ago. Yet, China’s experience with its first-ever client state, Democratic Kampuchea, suggests the effectiveness of Chinese foreign aid and the efficacy of Chinese influence that comes with it is only as good as the institutions that manage such a relationship.

Posted by zzhu at 02:43 AM

March 21, 2013

Special Panel Discussion: What Keeps Chinese Officials in Check, If At All?


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Tuesday, March 26, 2013
10am-11:30am (right before CCS Noon Lecture)
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Description:
In a one-party regime where government officials are not elected to power, what keeps them in check, if at all? What are some alternative mechanisms of accountability besides elections and formal political competition? And how effective are they? This panel brings together three political scientists to discuss the function and limits of non-electoral mechanisms of checks and accountability in contemporary China. These include online activism, a ‘rule of mandates’ alternative to rule of law, and market-based media.

About the speakers:


Yuen Yuen Ang is Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the developmental role of states in developing countries and strategies to build good governance under fiscal constraints. Her talk will compare the outcomes of “i-paid-a-bribe” – an online initiative for citizens to report petty bribe-giving – in India and China.


Mayling Birney is a Lecturer at the London School of Economics (LSE) and a comparative political scientist with a special expertise in China. She is currently finishing a book about China’s distinctive form of authoritarian governing, in which she highlights its consequences for stability, justice, rule of law, and political reform. She will talk about how China’s use of a ‘rule of mandates’ (in place of a rule of law) helps it to achieve a few high priorities yet hinders it in achieving broader accountability and justice.


Daniela Stockmann is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Leiden University. Her research on political communication and public opinion in China has been published in Comparative Political Studies, Political Communication, and The China Quarterly, among others. Her book, Media Commercialization and Authoritarian Rule in China (Cambridge University Press, 2013), argues that market-based media provide regime stability rather than simply a democratizing force for change in one-party states. She will talk about the role of market-based media in fostering “responsive authoritarianism” in China.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies and the International Institute.

Posted by zzhu at 07:36 PM

October 25, 2012

China Town Hall 2012


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The U-M Center for Chinese Studies and the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations
present:

CHINA Town Hall: A national day of programming on China involving 50 cities throughout the United States

Monday, October 29, 2012
Rackham 4th floor Amphitheater

915 East Washington
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Free and open to the public.

6:00 pm: Reception (West Conference Room, 4th floor Rackham)
We invite you to a reception to meet the Honorable Richard H. Solomon, Senior Fellow, Rand Corporation

7:00 pm: Talk: Wrestling with the Dragon: The Contemporary Challenges of Managing U.S.-China Relations
4th floor Amphitheater of Rackham

A presentation by the Honorable Richard H. Solomon

Forty years ago, President Nixon and Chairman Mao changed the dynamic of the Cold War by ending two decades of US-China confrontation. In the subsequent decades China opened up and has taken off -- under Deng Xiaoping's "kai fang" policies. Today China is a global economic powerhouse, with fifth generation leaders trying to reconcile their one-party political system with the needs and demands of a mobilized society. How will they use China's economic power and and growing global influence to attain long-held political and economic goals? Managing contemporary US-China relations is a major challenge for America's foreign policy -- and for China's.

8:00 pm: Live Webcast Interview ~ Gary F. Locke, U.S. Ambassador to China

The interview with Ambassador Locke will be moderated by Mr. Stephen A. Orlins, President, National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

Questions from the Audience: Audience members may participate in this interview by submitting questions to the National Committee. Members with smart phones may send in questions during the evening's presentation to: chinatownhall2012@gmail. Please include the name of the local venue (University of Michigan Center for Chinese Studies) in your message. They will only pull questions from e-mails that include the name of the local venue. You can also tweet questions to @NCUSCR.

Richard H. Solomon served as president of the U.S. Institute of Peace, a congressionally established and funded organization, between 1993 and 2012. He led its growth into a nationally recognized center of international conflict management analysis and applied programs around the world. He currently is a senior fellow at the RAND Corporation.

Prior to his tenure at the Institute of Peace, Solomon was assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 1989 to 1992. In that position he negotiated the Cambodia peace agreement (the first United Nations Security Council conflict settlement); had a leading role in the dialogue on nuclear issues between the United States and South and North Korea; helped establish the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation initiative; and led U. S. negotiations with Japan, Mongolia and Vietnam on important bilateral matters. In 1992–1993 Solomon served as U. S. ambassador to the Philippines, where he coordinated the closure of the U.S. naval facilities and developed a new framework for bilateral and regional security cooperation.

Solomon previously served as director of policy planning in the State Department (1986-89), and as a senior staff member of the National Security Council (1971-76), where he participated in the normalization of relations with China. He began his career in 1966 as professor of political science at the University of Michigan. He also served for a decade as head of the political science department at the RAND Corporation (1976-86).

In 1995 Solomon was awarded the State Department's Foreign Affairs Award for Public Service, and he has received awards for policy initiatives from the governments of Korea and Thailand, and the Cambodian community in the U.S. In 2005 he received the American Political Science Association’s Hubert H. Humphrey Award for “notable public service by a political scientist.”

Solomon holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has published eight books on a range of topics related to international affairs.

Posted by zzhu at 08:06 PM

October 03, 2012

Alumnus to speak about work in China at Rackham Centennial Lecture


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Rackham Centennial Lecture, presented as a part of the Rackham Centennial Alumni Series

Friday, October 12, 2012 | 4pm-5:30pm
Rackham Amphitheatre, 4th floor
915 East Washington St., Ann Arbor

Reception to follow: 5:30pm-6:30pm
Osterman Common Room
South Thayer Building, 202 S. Thayer Street


Michael J. Dunne
President, Dunne & Company Ltd.

A Road Less Traveled: What Happens when you go to Asia Straight after Graduation from the University of Michigan

Co-sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Nam Center for Korean Studies, LSA DMC, and Rackham Graduate School.

Speaker Biography: Michael J. Dunne is president of Dunne & Company Ltd., a Hong Kong-based investment advisory firm specializing in Asia’s car markets. He is author of the 2011 book American Wheels Chinese Roads The Story of General Motors in China (John Wiley and Sons).

Three weeks after earning an MBA and MA in Southeast Asian Studies from the University of Michigan in the summer of 1990, Dunne boarded a flight to Asia. He soon founded Automotive Resources Asia (ARA), a car consultancy. ARA expanded operations in China and Southeast Asia over the next decade and became recognized as a leading authority on Asia’s emerging car markets from China to Thailand to India. In 2006, ARA was acquired by J.D. Power and Associates and Dunne was named vice president and managing director for China, based in Shanghai.

Dunne’s commentaries have been published in the Wall Street Journal, International Herald Tribune, Management Review, and Automotive News. He was featured in an acclaimed National Geographic documentary on China’s car culture and has been a featured guest speaker at the JP Morgan China Investor Conference every year between 2006 and 2011. He also appears regularly as a guest expert on Bloomberg, CNBC, and CNN.

A native of Detroit, Michael Dunne speaks Chinese and Thai. He worked in Beijing and Shanghai during the 1990s and 2000s and currently divides his time between China and Jakarta, Indonesia, where he lives with his wife, Merlien, and their three children.

Posted by zzhu at 05:40 PM

September 27, 2012

CCS Annual Conference: Feminist Sinologies


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Please click on flier to go to conference site:

Location: Anderson ABCD, Michigan Union
Time: 9am to 5pm (Friday and Saturday, Oct 5-6)
9-12pm (Sunday, Oct 7)

Open to the Public

A collaborative intellectual effort between the English, Comparative Literature, East-Asian Studies and Women’s Studies Departments, Feminist Sinologies is a three day conference hosted by the Center for Chinese Studies that explores the intersections of feminism and sinology in all their current forms.

The conference will consist of 12 speakers and 4 non-concurrent panels featuring an international and interdisciplinary crowd including the foremost scholars doing research in this area, as well as graduate students and non-traditional researchers.

Topics covered include:
- the role of mediation in Chinese feminism,
- historical gender formations in sinological studies,
- writing/translation/textuality,
- alternative Chinese modernities,
- the Cultural Revolution,
- the gender landscape of contemporary China,
- transnational Chinese gender constructions, and
- historical Chinese feminisms.

Speakers include:
Beverly Bosseler, Mary Chapman, Tamara Ho, Joan Judge, Susan Koshy, Andrea Lingenfelter, David Porter, Ann Waltner, Wang Lingzhen, Wang Zheng, and Sharon Wesoky.

For detailed conference info, please visit: http://feministsinologies.lsa.umich.edu/
Specific questions can be addressed to Nan Z. Da (nda[at]umich[dot]edu).

Posted by zzhu at 10:15 PM

March 22, 2012

Liu Junhai: "Globalization and CSR Requirements" - Thursday, March 29, 2012


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Globalization and CSR Requirements for Multinationals Doing Business in China

Liu Junhai
Professor, School of Law
Director, Business Law Center
Renmin University of China

Thursday, March 29, 2012 | 5pm-6:30pm
Room R2230 Ross School of Business
715 Tappan Street

Professor Liu will discuss the requirements of Corporate Social Responsibility from both legal and moral perspectives, and the significance of CSR-oriented corporate governance for corporations including multinationals doing business in China.

His core argument is that CSR is not a financial burden or transaction cost for multinationals. Instead, socially responsible multinationals will gain competitive advantage and reduce transaction costs substantially. He will analyze the causes of CSR scandals at multinationals in China, and prescribe some reform suggestions for multinationals, Chinese governments, institutional investors and consumers. For the purpose of building a win-win and harmonious environment for doing business in China, multinationals need to improve their corporate governance, create CSR-friendly supplier chain management frameworks, and enable the stakeholders in their supply chains to influence their decision making. Further, government procurement should be used to motivate socially responsible business.

Prof. Liu Junhai is the first Chinese scholar to study corporate social responsibility (CSR) in China. His academic work The Corporate Social Responsibility based on his visiting research at Norwegian Institute of Human Rights from 1996 to 1997, was published by Press of Law in 1999 as the first monograph on the research of CSR. Many of the suggestions in this book were endorsed by Article 5 and other articles of Corporate Law of 2005, which is the first statute in the world to include a special CSR article. Additionally, employee representatives on the board of directors in state-owned or controlled corporations and the board of supervisors in every corporation were also made mandatory by the legislature in 2005, due to the pressure from the All China Federation of Trade Unions (ACFTU) and his theoretical support to ACFTU with the employee participation in corporate governance in his monograph. Prof. Liu has been making efforts in advising Chinese legislature to extend the CSR philosophy broadly to many other legal areas such as consumer law and labor law. His current research covers modernization of Chinese corporate law, securities regulation and private equity funds. He is a Hughes Fellow and Grotius Fellow at Michigan for the academic year of 2011-2012.

This presentation is co-sponsored by the U-M Center for Chinese Studies and the ERB Institute for Sustainable Enterprise.

Posted by zzhu at 02:15 PM

March 04, 2012

Tang Junyi Lecture Series Featuring Brian Bruya


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Wednesday, March 21, 2012
6PM Reception - 4th Floor Atrium of Palmer Commons
7PM Presentation - 4th Floor Forum Hall of Palmer Commons

Nature, Self, and Artifice: On the Divisibility of the Self in Action and Aesthetics

Can human behavior be natural rather than artificial? Although human beings are generally understood to be continuous with nature, human behavior and its products are consistently categorized as artificial rather than natural, and "nature" is generally defined as not human. This situation makes it theoretically impossible to account both for natural action in humans and for artifice in non-human animals. In this article, I interrogate the traditional nature/human dichotomy with respect to artifice. Artifice is a feature of human psychology that is found to be marked by a subjective sense of volitional unity. Through an examination of philosophical and scientific literature, I demonstrate that the human being can act not only competently but at very high levels absent this subjective sense of volitional unity. Such action is a variety of the self-organization that is a central feature of nature and so accounts for human action that can be plausibly characterized as natural.

Brian Bruya works at the intersection of ancient Chinese philosophy, cognitive science, and the philosophy of action. His work is a broad attempt to understand abiding issues in the metaphysics, aesthetics, and psychology of action, with an emphasis on effortless action. He has published a comparative analysis of effortless action in Daoism and the West, an edited volume on the cognitive science of effortless attention (MIT Press), and is currently working on an edited volume that brings Chinese philosophy into dialogue with numerous issues in contemporary analytic philosophy (MIT Press).

This presentation is sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, The U-M College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts, and by generous gift from Donald J. Munro, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Chinese and Ann Munro.

Posted by zzhu at 02:04 PM

March 01, 2012

Leadership Transition in East Asia and the United States


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Thursday, March 8, 2012
4:00pm


Educational Conference Center
Room 1840
School of Social Work
1080 South University
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Free and open to the public

A panel discussion on recent and upcoming political transitions, including the 2012 Presidential Election in Taiwan, the upcoming leadership transition in the Chinese Communist Party, and the 2012 Presidential Election in the United States. Four experts on the region will join moderator, William Foreman of U-M News Service, to discuss how these political changes will affect US-China Relations, Cross-Strait Relations, and the recent “pivot” in US foreign policy toward Asia.

Panel discussants are:

Steven M. Goldstein, Sophia Smith Professor of Government, Smith College
Mary Gallagher, U-M Associate Professor of Political Science
John D. Ciorciari, U-M Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
Kharis Templeman, U-M Doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science
William Foreman, U-M News Service, Moderator

Posted by zzhu at 11:33 PM

February 01, 2012

Room for Another View: China’s Art in Disciplinary Perspective


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An international conference exploring meta-disciplinary perspectives around such topics as academies, print, landscape, gardens, fashion, canons, and the language of art itself.

Friday, February 10

Welcome: Derek Collins, Associate Dean for Humanities
Opening Remarks: Matt Biro, Chair of Department of History of Art
Opening Address: Martin Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures

Production
Patricia Ebrey (University of Washington)
Cary Liu (Princeton University)
J.P. Park (University of Colorado, Boulder)
Martin Powers (UM)
Panel: David Doris (UM), John Onians (University of East Anglia), Erik Meuggler (UM)

Reality
Dora Ching (Princeton University)
Shane McCausland (SOAS)
Katherine Tsiang (University of Chicago)
Peter Sturman (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Panel: Alex Potts (UM), David Summers (University of Virginia), Kevin Carr (UM)

Persons
Jessica Rawson (Oxford University)
Xin Wu (College of William and Mary)
Tani Barlow (Rice University)
Wu Hung (University of Chicago)
Panel: David Porter (UM), James Elkins (Art Institute of Chicago), Diane Owen Hughes (UM)

Saturday, February 11

Reflexivity
Eugene Wang (Harvard University)
Alfreda Murck (National Palace Museum, Beijing)
Chen Jianhua (HKUST)
Jerome Silbergeld (Princeton University)
Panel: Celeste Brusati (UM), Nicholas Mirzoeff (NYU), Christian de Pee (UM)

Language Ronald Egan (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Susan Bush (Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard)
Ginger Hsu (Yang Ming University, Taiwan)
Richard Vinograd (Stanford University)
Cao Yiqiang (China Academy of Arts)
Panel: Xiaobing Tang (UM), W.J.T. Mitchell (University of Chicago), Basic Dufallo (UM)

Closing Remarks: Haun Saussy (University of Chicago)

For more information, visit http://www.lsa.umich.edu/histart or email HistArtEvents[at]umich[dot]edu

Posted by zzhu at 01:57 PM

November 11, 2011

China Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections - Wednesday, November 16, 2011


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THIS PRESENTATION IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING HERE.

Please click on flier for Webcast links and additional information.

Posted by zzhu at 01:09 AM

October 07, 2011

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan

Water Stains on the Wall
Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan

Lin Hwai-min, artistic director
Friday, October 21 | 8 pm
Saturday, October 22 | 8 pm
Power Center
Pre- and post-performance activities, too!

Presented by University Musical Society and sponsored by the U-M Center for Chinese Studies.

Tickets are still available! Purchase options can be found here.

Reflections from the local Taiwanese community on Cloud Gate Dance Theatre:

Posted by zzhu at 10:45 PM

October 04, 2011

CCS Special Presentation by Gail Hershatter, Friday, October 14, 2011


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The Girl Who Burned the Banknotes: Rural Women and China's Collective Past

A lecture by

Gail Hershatter
Distinguished Professor and Chair
University of California, Santa Cruz

4:30pm: Presentation
4th Floor Forum Hall
Palmer Commons
100 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor

Posted by zzhu at 05:12 PM

October 03, 2011

Chinese Kites on Exhibit at U-M Hospital, Main Lobby + related events

Bringing the world of art & music to
The University of Michigan Health System

Free and open to the public.

Look to the Skies: Chinese Kites
Kite Master Ha Yiqi
October 17-December 5, 2011
Gifts of Art Gallery — University Hospital Main Lobby, Floor 1. Open daily from 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
As part of this year’s U-M New Millennium Kite Festival, in celebration of the Center for Chinese Studies’ 50th Anniversary, Gifts of Art presents an exhibition of the work of Chinese Kite Master Ha Yiqi. Master Ha is a fourth generation kite maker from Beijing, and he is one of China’s most distinguished and skilled artisans, keeping alive the craft and tradition of an art form that is widely popular throughout Asia. Student kites from Professor Anne Mondro’s Art&Design class on traditional Chinese kite making are also on display. Gifts of Art is offering a Chinese Kite Making Demonstration on Oct. 20 in the gallery from 12:00-1:30 pm by Anne Mondro and Matt Shlian, U-M School of Art & Design, who both studied with Master Ha in Beijing.

Chinese Kite Making Demonstration
Anne Mondro & Matthew Shlian
Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011, 12:00-1:30 pm
University Hospital Main Lobby, Floor 1
Professor Anne Mondro and Matthew Shlian will demonstrate the art of making a traditional Chinese kite and various paper folding techniques. Watch as bamboo is spliced to create the kite frame. Matt Shlian will also demonstrate how to fold paper to inspire you to create your own contemporary kite structure. Mondro and Shlian studied Chinese kite making with Master Ha in Beijing this past summer.
http://mblog.lib.umich.edu/CCS/ September 11, 2011 posting

Traditional Chinese Music
Xiaodong Wei on erhu (2-stringed spike fiddle)and guzheng (zither)
Thursday, November 17, 2011, TBD
University Hospital Main Lobby, Floor 1
You heard her on the afternoon of the September 25 Kite Festival. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBnJdBMV_1Y
Now, enjoy Xiaodong Wei’s music once again as she performs selections from Chinese classical music.
--Traditionally, palace kites were constructed with bamboo pipes so when flown they would make a sound like the zheng, a stringed zither. Thus, the word for kite became feng (wind) zheng (zither).
Xiaodong Wei's performance is sponsored by the Confucius Institute at U-M.

Posted by zzhu at 10:01 PM

September 11, 2011

Artists bring the art of Chinese kite-building to U-M

The official kite press release!

Posted by zzhu at 12:18 PM

September 10, 2011

Exciting events related to contemporary Chinese woodblock exhibition currently on view at UMMA



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Unless otherwise noted, events are free and open to public, and take place at UMMA.

LECTURE
Reading the Popular Chinese Print:
A Lecture by Ellen Johnston Laing

Wednesday, September 14, 5 pm
HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM

ARTIST CONVERSATIONS AND DIALOGUES
UMMA Dialogues: Guest Curator Xiaobing Tang with Noted Printmakers Fang Limin and Zhang Yuanfan
Sunday, September 25, 2 pm
HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM

In Conversation with Chen Limin
Wednesday, September 28, 5 pm
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
This program is followed by a reception and is cosponsored by the UM Center for the Education of Women.

In Conversation with Artist and Printmaker Endi Poskovic
Sunday, October 9, 3 pm
A. ALFRED TAUBMAN GALLERIES

A Chinese Printmaker’s Cultural Identity and the Transformation in Contemporary Printmaking: A Lecture by Chen Qi
Thursday, October 13, 7 pm
HELMUT STERN AUDITORIUM
This program is preceded by a reception at 6 pm in the
Commons, and is organized and cosponsored by the UM Center for Chinese Studies.

ARTMAKING
Hands-on Workshop: Japanese and Chinese Aesthetics and Woodblock Printing
Saturday, October 15, 10 am–1 pm
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
Instructor: Christina Burch
$28 UMMA and AAAC members and UM students
$35 non-members; lab fee $15, materials included
Advance registration required.
Register online at annarborartcenter.org by October 12.

TEACHER WORKSHOP
Teacher Workshop Featuring Guest Curator Xiaobing Tang
Wednesday, October 19, 4–8 pm
Advance registration and fee required.
Contact preister@umich.edu.

SMTD@UMMA
Wood Cuts: An Evening of Chamber Music Inspired by the Sounds of Wood
Sunday, October 23, 8 pm
APSE
The SMTD@UMMA concert series is made possible in part by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund.

EXHIBITION TOURS
UMMA’s award-winning docents offer public tours of the exhibition on Sundays at 2 pm. Check umma.umich.edu for details.

Please click on flier to learn more on the Web site of the U-M Museum of Art!

Posted by zzhu at 07:13 PM

September 09, 2011

Kite Festival Lecture on Wind Energy & Sustainability


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As part of the activities building up to the Sept 25 Kite Festival, CCS outreach is partnering with the U-M Global Scholars program to present a lecture on the future of wind energy and its global and local impact.

Energizing Michigan’s Economy: Creating Jobs and Reducing Pollution through Clean Energy
Mike Shriberg, PhD
Thursday, Sept 15
4:00-5:30pm
Rackham Amphitheater, 4th Floor
Rackham Graduate School, 915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor

Posted by zzhu at 11:47 PM

September 01, 2011

Special presentation by author of new, critically-acclaimed book on sex ratio imbalance

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THIS PRESENTATION IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING HERE.

Special Presentation

Unnatural Selection: The Causes and Consequences of Asia's Sex Ratio Imbalance

Mara Hvistendahl
Correspondent and Author

Thursday, September 29, 2011
4pm: Presentation
4th Floor Forum Hall
U-M Palmer Commons
100 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor

Reviews of Hvistendahl’s "Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys Over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men":
Asian Review of Books, June 13, 2011
Financial Times, June 13, 2011
Bloomberg News, June 19, 2011
The Washington Post, July 1, 2011
The Economist, August 6, 2011

Related media appearances:
Gender Selection In A World Of Too Many Men, WBUR's On Point with Tom Ashbrook, June 8, 2011
In Asia, The Perils Of Aborting Girls And Keeping Boys, NPR Morning Edition, June 15, 2011
Parents in Asia using modern technology to choose boys over girls, WBEZ Chicago's Worldview, June 22, 2011
A world without girls?, BBC Radio 4, June 25, 2011

Posted by zzhu at 02:35 AM

July 17, 2011

NOW OPEN - Multiple Impressions: Contemporary Chinese Woodblock Prints


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July 16, 2011 – October 23, 2011
University of Michigan Museum of Art

This exhibition presents works by 40 leading printmakers from contemporary China to showcase the extraordinary innovations, in both technique and conception, which have transformed this long-established art form in recent years. The exhibition features 114 works by such artists as Xu Bing, Kang Ning, Song Yuanwen, Chen Qi, He Kun, and Fang Limin, as well as many other accomplished printmakers. Curated by Dr. Xiaobing Tang, Helmut F. Stern Professor of Modern Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan and organized by UMMA with the assistance and cooperation of the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China, this exhibition - the largest examination of contemporary Chinese prints in the US since 2000 - provides an important framework for understanding both contemporary art from China and contemporary Chinese society.

Please click on flier for more information and to view some of the artwork on the UMMA site.

Posted by zzhu at 03:14 PM

July 14, 2011

CCS Public Lecture by Ken Lieberthal, Thursday, October 20, 2011

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Posted by zzhu at 04:25 PM

June 10, 2011

A Chinese Printmaker’s Cultural Identity and the Transformation in Contemporary Printmaking: A Lecture by Noted Artist CHEN Qi


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THIS PRESENTATION IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING HERE.

Dr. Chen Qi 陈琦
Professor in the Prints Department
Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing

Thursday, October 13, 2011

6:00pm: Reception
Commons ▪ Frankel Wing

7:00pm: Presentation
Stern Auditorium ▪ Frankel Wing
University of Michigan Museum of Art
525 South State Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Please see flier for more information on lecture and click on it to learn more about the upcoming exhibition featuring Dr. Chen's work.

Posted by zzhu at 02:24 PM

April 14, 2011

Developing Global Sustainability - U.S./China Partnerships

May 20-21, 2011
Organized by faculty from the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, the Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute, the Michigan Memorial Energy Institute, the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, the UM/PKU Joint Institute and the UM/SJTU Joint Institute, the Center for Chinese Studies, and OVPR.

POSTER COMPETITION - ABSTRACTS ARE DUE APRIL 22, 2011

Click here for more information on the poster competition as well as registration.

Program

The meeting will begin on Friday, May 20, 2011 at 9 a.m. with welcome remarks, followed by the first plenary address. The second half of the morning will consist of concurrent sessions on the three conference themes of energy, transportation and water. Following lunch, concurrent sessions will continue through the end of the afternoon.

A banquet will be held on Friday evening followed by an event focused on the cross-cultural challenges of communicating about sustainability.

On Saturday, May 21, a plenary address will take place at 9:30 a.m. The second half of the morning will consist of concurrent sessions on the three conference themes of energy, transportation and water. Following lunch, additional sessions will held. Final remarks for the all participants are scheduled for mid-afternoon.

PLENARY SESSIONS

OPENING PLENARY: DEVELOPING GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY - CHINA/U.S. PARTNERSHIPS

Xia Guang, Director
Policy Research Center for Environmental Economy
Ministry of Environmental Protection
Beijing, China

David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs
U.S. Department of Energy
Washington, D.C. US

OPENING PLENARY PANEL: DEVELOPING GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY - CHINA/U.S. PARTNERSHIPS

Xia Guang, Director
Policy Research Center for Environmental Economy
Ministry of Environmental Protection
Beijing, China

Jun Ma, Director
Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs
Beijing, China

Neil Hawkins, Vice President of Sustainability and Environment, Health and Safety
The Dow Chemical Company
Midland, MI US

David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs
U.S. Department of Energy
Washington, D.C. US

PLENARY: INFORMATION CHANGES EVERYTHING - INFORMING THE PUBLIC ABOUT THEIR SUSTAINABILITY CHOICES

Craig Cox, Senior Vice President
The Environmental Working Group
Ames, IA US

Jun Ma, Director
Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs
Beijing, China

PLENARY: CULTURE DRIVES DEMANDS - STEPS TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE PACIFIC RIM

Yasheng Huang, Professor of International Management
International Program Professorship in Chinese Economy and Business
MIT Sloan School of Management
Cambridge, MA US

David E. Nye, Professor and Chair
Center for American Studies
University of Southern Denmark
Odense, Denmark

DISCUSSANT: Irving T. Salmeen, Research Scientist
Center for the Study of Complex Systems
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US


TOPICAL SESSIONS

Clean Vehicles for Tomorrow's Transportation

Dennis Assanis, Professor and Director
Michigan Memorial Phoenix Energy Institute
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

Christopher Grundler, Deputy Director
Environmental Protection Agency
National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory
Ann Arbor, MI US

Huang Zhen, Vice President
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Shanghai, China

Building for Sustainability: Strategies of Better Living

Mark Levine, Director
Environmental Energy Technologies Division
Founder, China Energy Group
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
University of California, Berkeley
Berkeley, CA US

William Jackson, Research and Development Leader
The Dow Chemical Company
Midland, MI US

Da Yan, Associate Professor
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Strategies for Sustainable Transportation: The Role of National Policy

Robert L. Bertini, Deputy Administrator
Director, Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office
Research and Innovative Technology Administration
U.S. Department of Transportation
Washington, D.C. US

Feng Fei, Director-General
Department of Industrial Economics Research
Development Research Center
The State Council of the People's Republic of China
Beijing, China

Peter F. Sweatman, Director
Transportation Research Institute
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

Coal-Based Options for Energy Generation: Strategies for the Next Thirty Years

Ningsheng Cai, Professor
Department of Thermal Engineering
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Jerald J. Fletcher, Director
Natural Resources Analysis Center
West Virginia University
Morgantown, WV US

Robert H. Williams, Senior Research Scientist
Princeton Environmental Institute
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ US

Integrated Water Systems - From Watershed to the Tap

Ximing Cai, Vent T. Chow Faculty Scholar and Associate Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana, IL US

Chunmiao Zheng, Professor
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Alabama
Chair Professor of Water Resources
Peking University
Peking, China

Use of Waterfootprinting and Other Stewardship Tools to Enable Policy

Peter Adriaens, Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

J. Paul Ganter, Co-Founder and Director
Circle of Blue
Traverse City, MI US

Wendy Larson, Senior Scientist
Limno-Tech, Inc.
Ann Arbor, MI US

John T. Peichel, Global Product Manager
GE Water & Process Technologies
Minnetonka, MN US

Guoping Zhang, Project Manager
Water Footprint Network
c/o University of Twente
The Netherlands

Delivering on the Promise of Sustainability - The Challenge for 21st Century Business

Xiangli Chen, General Manager
GE China Technology Center
Shanghai, China

Xiaojian You, Chair
China Social Innovation Foundation
Senior Manager, Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise
Johnson School of Management, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY US

Gabe Wing, Manager
Design for the Environment
Environmental Health and Safety
Herman Miller, Inc.

Yumei Dong, Division Chief of Development
Beijing Central Business District Administration Committee
Beijing, China

Power and Water? Competitive Needs from our Dams

Wang Hao, Director
Water Resources Research Center
China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research
Beijing, China

Patricia Mulroy, General Manager
Las Vegas Valley Water District
Southern Nevada Water Authority
Las Vegas, NV US

The Role of Safety in Sustainable Transportation

Qiu Shaobo, Technical Director
Vehicle Safety
China FAW Group Corporation
China

Wei Zhang, Professor of Industrial Engineering
Tsinghua University
Beijing, China

Jim Noble, Line of Business Director - Motor Fleet
Zurich Services Corporation
Schaumburg, IL US

Michael Sivak, Director
Human Factors Group
Transportation Research Institute
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI US

Pollution Control – Progress in China and the United States

Shu Tao, Professor
College of Urban and Environmental Sciences
Peking University

Posted by zzhu at 02:57 PM

April 08, 2011

A tribute to Shakespeare from Taiwan Bangzi Opera!


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“BOND” – a Taiwan Bangzi Opera adaption of “The Merchant of Venice” 豫莎劇 – 《約/束》
Starring Hai-ling Wang, Diva of Taiwan Bangzi Opera, and Mei-li Chu, Ya-ling Hsiao, and Chien-hua Liu

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 | 7pm
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
University of Michigan
911 North University, Ann Arbor, MI

Audience members are advised of the following:
- English and Chinese subtitles will be provided.
- There is no intermission; a Q&A session will immediately follow the performance.
- This special performance is free and open to the public. Seats are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. University policy limiting the size of the audience to the number of seats available will be strictly enforced.
- This performance is not recommended for children under the age of ten.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Related events (also free and open to the public):

Bangzi Family Night 親子活動: Fun for all ages – demonstration-lecture on the best of Chinese opera, video screenings of four essential opera roles that will appear in the performance, and brief opera lessons on body movement and martial arts!
Date/Time: Sunday, April 10, 2011 | 7pm
Location: Auditorium A, Angell Hall, U-M Central Campus (enter via glass doors at fishbowl, off diag), Ann Arbor

Bangzi Opera Workshop 豫劇工作坊: Members of Taiwanese Bangzi Company and academics of the genre will provide an insightful introduction to this type of traditional Chinese opera. Live performances will surely brighten the workday!
Date/Time: Monday, April 11, 2011 | 12noon
Location: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University (corner of South U. and East U.), Ann Arbor

All three events are sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan, with support from U-M Department of English and Comparative Literature's Year of Comparison. Special thanks to members of the Taiwanese American community of Ann Arbor and Greater Detroit for their dedicated assistance.


Relate lecture: Monday April 11, 4:00pm, 3222 Angell Hall

Speaker: Alexander Huang, Penn State University

Title: Global Shakespeares 2.0: Digital Humanities Today

Abstract:
The age of global Shakespeare 2.0 has arrived. It is an age in which Shakespearean performance is shaped by its self-referentiality and inter-media citational strategies. "Shakespeare" fosters friendly associations and hostile confrontations with equal force. This illustrated presentation will explore how the digital video archive can decouple Shakespearean text and performance in ideological formations and re-join them as open sites where negotiations of meanings take place. A world increasingly driven by market economy rather than ideological difference has led to the coexistence and confluence of multiple manifestations of Shakespeare.

Speaker Bio:
Alexander Huang is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Penn State University, Research Affiliate in Literature at MIT, the general editor of *The Shakespearean International Yearbook*, early modern studies faculty of the Middlebury College Bread Loaf School of English, and the Vice President of the Association for Asian Performance.

One of his recent books, *Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange* (published by Columbia University Press), received the MLA's Scaglione Prize and an honorable mention of NYU's Joe A. Callaway Prize for the Best Book on Drama and Theatre.

As the co-founder and co-editor of *Global Shakespeares*, an open-access digital video archive based at MIT, he was the video curator of an exhibition on early modern and postmodern Sino-European cultural exchange at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. His research has been sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), International Shakespeare Association (ISA), the Folger Institute, and other organizations.

Posted by zzhu at 04:11 PM

April 07, 2011

Bangzi-related events


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The following events are part of a series of activities built around “BOND” – a Taiwan Bangzi Opera adaption of “The Merchant of Venice” 豫莎劇 – 《約/束》

Bangzi Family Night 親子活動: Fun for all ages – demonstration-lecture on the best of Chinese opera, video screenings of four essential opera roles that will appear in the performance, and brief opera lessons on body movement and martial arts!
Date/Time: Sunday, April 10, 2011 | 7pm
Location: Auditorium A, Angell Hall, U-M Central Campus (enter via glass doors at fishbowl, off diag), Ann Arbor

Bangzi Opera Workshop 豫劇工作坊: Members of Taiwanese Bangzi Company and academics of the genre will provide an insightful introduction to this type of traditional Chinese opera. Live performances will surely brighten the workday!
Date/Time: Monday, April 11, 2011 | 12noon
Location: Room 1636, School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University (corner of South U. and East U.), Ann Arbor

All the Bangzi events are sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan, with support from U-M Department of English and Comparative Literature's Year of Comparison. Special thanks to members of the Taiwanese American community of Ann Arbor and Greater Detroit for their dedicated assistance.

Posted by zzhu at 10:17 PM

March 04, 2011

Ann Arbor Film Festival Opening Reception of Wang Bing's Crude Oil

The Ann Arbor Film Festival is proud to present Wang Bing (王兵)'s 14-hour video Crude Oil via an exhibition March 11 - April 1 at the University of Michigan WORK gallery. On Friday, March 25 at 3pm in the UM Museum of Art, the 49th Ann Arbor Film Festival will present an artist talk with Wang Bing via Skype, co-hosted by the UM Department of Screen Arts and Cultures and moderated by UM professor Markus Nornes. The Wang Bing exhibition and artist talk are supported by the UM Center for Chinese Studies and the Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan.

In 2008 Chinese filmmaker Wang Bing followed a team of workers on an oil-drilling rig in China's remote Qinghai province. The resulting extraordinary 14-hour film, Crude Oil, is a patient observation of the large and small details in the grinding daily routine of the men as they work the platform in the harsh and near featureless landscape of Huatugou, a high plateau some 3900 meters above sea level.

Crude Oil will be shown as an installation piece in the WORK gallery Ann Arbor, presented in two 7-hour sections on alternate days during gallery hours. The AAFF will host an opening reception with light fare Friday, March 11 in conjunction with Sarah Berkeley's Walking Mind exhibition at the WORK gallery.

OPENING: Wang Bing Crude Oil / Sarah Berkeley Walking Mind
WHEN: Friday, March 11 @ 7 - 10pm
WHERE: WORK gallery Ann Arbor
306 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Gallery hours Tue - Sat 12-7

Posted by zzhu at 02:49 PM

March 03, 2011

Chinese hip-hop 中国嘻哈


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Friday, March 11, 2011 | 5:30pm
Pendleton Room, Michigan Union

Free and open to the public. Join on facebook.

From headspinning Haitians to freestyling Francophones, hip-hop has spanned the globe all the way to the Middle Kingdom. Hip-hop is a recent development in China but is a wildly growing trend with new artists popping up every day.

Come and meet Young Kin from Yin Ts’ang (隐藏), mainland China’s first rap group ever to get signed to a record label. Young Kin will be talking about his experiences with his own record label YinEnt (瘾乐), the current state of hip hop in China, and some challenges Chinese hip hop artists face, such as censorship, financial backing, and an overall politically and creatively oppressive climate.

The talk will finish with a rapping showcase by Young Kin, as well as a break-dancing demonstration by world-renowned Bboy Fishball from Hong Kong’s Rhythm Attack and RockLee from Macau. All three performers will be available for a Q&A.

This event is being hosted by Element-1 in tandem with Master the Art 8:
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=196206253726346.

CHINESE HIP-HOP is sponsored by the Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan and the Center for Chinese Studies.

Young Kin's newest video:

Rhythm Attack, Hong Kong flava!

Posted by zzhu at 03:51 PM

February 01, 2011

Screening of Wang Bing (王兵)'s West of the Tracks (铁西区)

Wang Bing's West of the Tracks (「铁西区」, 王兵 导演)

Do you love film?
Do you love film enough to watch a nine hour masterpiece?

Come watch West of the Tracks at Projectorhead Extreme...

We dare you!

PHExtreme will show the entire film on Saturday, and for those wimps who can't hack the entire film in one sitting, Part III will be shown again on Sunday. Audience is welcome to bring survival supplies: pillows, food, Red Bull, etc.

Projectorhead will supply the coffee!

COST: Free!
PLACE: 1175 North Quad

TIMES:
February 19 (Saturday):
Part I: 11:00~2:45
Part II: 3:30~6:30
Part III: 8:00~10:15

February 20 (Sunday):
Part III: 3:00~5:15

Film Festivals, Screenings, Awards

Grand Prize, International Documentary Festival, Marseille, 2003
Grand Prize, Robert and Frances Flaherty Grand Prize, Yamagata, 2003
Grand Prize, International Documentary Festival, Lisbon, 2002
Berlin International Film Festival, 2002
Montgolfiere d'Or juried prize for documentary, 3 Continents Festival, Nantes
Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival, Ithaca, NY, 2009
forumdoc.bh.2009, Brazil

"Without question the greatest work to have come out of the Chinese documentary movement, and must be ranked among the most extraordinary achievements of world cinema in the new century." — Lu Xinyu, New Left Review

"Capturing moments both large and small...this profoundly empathetic and humanist work bears witness to a vanished way of life and the real cost of progress." — Jeanette Catsoulis, The New York Times

"A transfixing experience - if an undeniably demanding one - Wang Bing's nine-hour documentary on Chinese industrial decay should take its place as a key work of socially minded vérité" — Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out New York

More on West of the Tracks:
• Jie Lie in Jump Cut
http://www.ejumpcut.org/archive/jc50.2008/WestofTracks/index.html
• Just Another Film Buff blog
http://unspokencinema.blogspot.com/2010/07/tie-xi-qu-west-of-tracks.html
• Eight Rooks on Twitch
http://twitchfilm.com/reviews/2010/02/iffr-2010-extra-wang-bings-west-of-the-tracks-tie-xi-qu-dvd-review.php

Director's biography: Wang Bing is a leading figure of the exciting and unprecedented documentary movement that has been gathering vital momentum within the Chinese cinema over the last decade. Wang’s epic documentariesWest of the Tracks, Fengming: A Chinese Memoir and Crude Oil define the brave political outspokenness, tenacity and artistic sophistication that continues to inspire a new and ambitious generation of young Chinese filmmakers. From the vast, nine-hour panorama of a dying factory town meticulously crafted byWest of the Tracks to Fengming’s transformation of the Cultural Revolution into a gripping first person narration and Crude Oil’s real time portrait of the grueling fourteen hour working day of oil workers, Wang’s formally daring films offer profound meditations on history and the paradox of the industrial ruin and human suffering caused by the inexorable “progress” of modern China. A different, more dedicated, mode of spectatorship is required and infinitely rewarded by the awesome scale and sheer length of Wang’s features, which treat time as almost a sculptural element, using their intense duration to give a solidity and presence to the crumbling factories, shantytowns and lonely rooms that they explore and cohabit. Forging a rare intimacy with the workers, widows and chronically unemployed whose voices and struggles are made poignantly real within his films, Wang takes the observational ideal championed by cinema verité to a radical and important new level. Using no-frills digital video equipment, Wang creates intensely cinematic films that draw a raw, tragic beauty and power from the world of slow time defined by decaying industrial infrastructure and landscapes imploded by the steady exploitation of their resources. In his latest, shorter documentaries, Happy Valley and Coal Money, Wang has embraced a more essayistic mode of inquiry that condenses the hierarchy of labor and regulated capitalism into stubborn and fascinating riddles. Wang’s contribution to the omnibus film State of the World marks his first foray into fiction filmmaking and points towards his greatly anticipated narrative feature, The Ditch(2010).

And in March director Wang will give a talk at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, which will show more of his stunning work.

Brought to you through a collaboration between the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the Center for Chinese Studies, and the Confucius Institute.

Projectorhead is the free film series of the Department of Screen Arts and Cultures: to join our list email Phil Hallman at phallman[at]umich[dot]edu.

Posted by zzhu at 06:06 PM

January 18, 2011

U.S.-China Economic Law Conference, Friday, February 11, 2011


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Registration deadline is February 3, 2011. Please click on flier for additional information.

The meeting is distinguished by the important academic specialists and officials who will present, and from both sides of an increasing divide, including:

President Clinton's USTR, Ambassador Charlene Barshefsky,
who negotiated the bilateral agreement which paved the way for the PRC's accession to the WTO;

Madame Li Yongjie,
PRC Ministry of Commerce, presently in charge of all WTO litigation and dispute settlement under the WTO for the PRC;

Madame Zhang Ruosi, a PRC appointee to the WTO Secretariat (GATS Division) in Geneva;

Merit Janow, a former member of the WTO Appellate Body;

Tim Stratford, immediate past chief of the China desk at the USTR.

The meeting will also feature some of the University of Michigan's inter-disciplinary best, including the Law School's Ted Parson (climate negotiations and environmental law after Copenhagen); Ford School Associate Dean and Economics Professor Alan Deardorf (the currency problem); Poli Sci's and CCS' Mary Gallagher (labor rights and the law); and the Ross Business School's Zhao Minyuan (cross investment and technology sharing, or not, intellectual property, etc.).

We expect the exchange to be vigorous and highly substantive, and to range across a number of important aspects of the relationship: the WTO discipline itself; international trade and regulation; cross-border investment; intellectual property and high tech development; currency manipulation; labor and human rights; energy and the environment, etc.

It is our hope that you will think about attending some or all of the meeting, which will be held in Wayne Law's lovely Partrich Auditorium.

Free transportation will be provided by the conference, with buses departing from the Michigan Union at: 7:30am and 11:30am; and returning at: 2:00pm and 7:00pm. Please contact Holly Hughes at hhughes[at]wayne[dot]edu to arrange a place on the shuttle buses.

Posted by zzhu at 03:02 PM

East Asian Celebration: Long Life, Happiness & Prosperity


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Saturday, February 12, 1:30-4:00pm
Helmut Stern Auditorium

University of Michigan Museum of Art
525 South State Street
Ann Arbor 48109-1354

Spend an afternoon exploring the symbols representing long life, happiness and prosperity in the arts of Chinese, Japanese and Korean cultures. Artist and U-M professor, David Chung, will discuss his work “The Ten Immortals,” and performance highlights will feature Japanese and Korean musicians and storytellers. A self-guided scavenger hunt for hidden symbols will be available through the Asian galleries.

Presented by the U-M Centers for Chinese and Japanese Studies, Confucius Institute, and the Nam Center for Korean Studies.
Free and open to the public.

Contact Center for Chinese Studies for more information (734) 936-3961.


The Ten Immortals (2005) by David Chung

Posted by zzhu at 02:54 PM

December 15, 2010

Global Lens Film Series - THE SHAFT 地下的天空 (January 11, 2011)



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The Global Lens Initiative and the U-M Center for Chinese Studies Film Series present:

The Shaft (地下的天空)
Director Zhang Chi; China, 2008; 98 minutes; Mandarin with English subtitles

Trailer:

Tuesday, January 11, 2011
1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Two screenings: 3:00pm and 5:00pm

In a poor mining town in western China, the stories of a father and his two children intersect and intertwine, illuminating complicated relationships hidden beneath the community’s hardened exterior. Accused of an affair with her manager, the attractive daughter of the household finds herself spurned by her boyfriend and forced to accept an arranged marriage. Her brother dreams of being a singer, but after an unforeseen stint in prison, reluctantly heads into the mines like his father, who spends his days searching for the wife who left him so many years ago. Writer-director Zhang Chi’s wise and poetic debut delicately expresses the turmoil of emotion and expectation wrought by a calloused and difficult existence.

Director Zhang Chi was born in Beijing, China in 1977. He studied film direction at the Central Academy of Drama, and served as the director of the Chinese national television company, CCTV, from 2000 to 2004. In 2008, he won China’s Golden Rooster Award for Best Screenplay for the film Tokyo Trial. The Shaft is his first feature film.

This film is sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies. The Global Lens 2010-11 academic year series has been organized by the U-M International Institute with films provided by the Global Film Initiative.

For more information, please contact the U-M Center for Chinese Studies at 734—764-6308 or at chinese(dot)studies(at)umich.edu.

Posted by zzhu at 03:46 PM

October 14, 2010

Shanghai Municipal Archives: A Symposium at U-M - REVISED AGENDA


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Symposium on Archival Advances and Academic Interests in Shanghai Municipal Archives

Thursday, October 28, 2010
09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Forum Hall, Fourth Floor, Palmer Commons
100 E. Washtenaw, Ann Arbor
http://palmercommons.umich.edu/directions/

On the fiftieth anniversary of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies and in conjunction with the Sixth Joint Seminar on Archival Methods co-organized by the Bentley Historical Library of the University of Michigan and the State Archives Administration of China, a one-day symposium on Archival Advances and Historical Research: Shanghai Municipal Archives and Beyond will be held on October 28, 2010 on the University of Michigan campus. Two presentations by representatives of the Shanghai Municipal Archives will be followed by commentaries from University of Michigan faculty, Bentley archivists, the city archivist of Copenhagen, and China scholars from University of Toronto and Dickinson College. A total of thirty-six archivists from throughout China will attend the event.

Revised Agenda

SESSION I : 9:30am - 2:00pm
Chair: Fran Blouin
U-M Bentley Historical Library

9:30am – 10:10am
New Digital Developments in
Shanghai Municipal Archives
Yan Chang, Shanghai Municipal Archives

10:10am-10:40am: Commentary
Par Cassel, U-M History Department

BREAK: 10:40am – 11:00am

11:00am – 11:45am
Conceptualizing Copenhagen
through its City Archives
Kristian Bak, Copenhagen City Archives

LUNCH BREAK: 11:45 – 1:30pm

1:30pm – 2:00pm
Commentaries and Discussion
Elizabeth Yakel, U-M School of Information
Nancy Bartlett, U-M Bentley Historical Library

SESSION II: 2:00pm – 4:30pm
Chair: Ernie Young, U-M History Department

2:00pm – 2:40pm
Opening Up Archives and Development
of Research on Shanghai History
Guo Yongjun, Shanghai Municipal Archives

BREAK: 2:40pm – 3:00pm

3:00pm – 4:00pm
Interdisciplinary Approaches to
Archival Research
Neil Diamant, Dickinson College
Nico Howson, Michigan Law School
Wang Zheng, U-M Women’s Studies & History
Yiching Wu, University of Toronto

4:00pm – 4:30pm: General Discussion


Posted by zzhu at 10:42 PM

April 22, 2010

China Labor Rights Panel, Monday, April 26, 2:00pm



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CHINA: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND PLIGHT IN LABOR ADVOCACY

MONDAY, April 26th, 2010, 2:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Free and open to the public.

Xiang CHING (Executive Director, Pearl River Workers Service Center)
In conversation with Mary Gallagher (Director of the Center for Chinese Studies and Professor of Political Science)
along with Manfred Elfstrom (International Labor Rights Forum staffer)

Presented by the Center for Chinese Studies and Michigan China Fellows:

The Pearl River Delta region strikes the world as being a place of dramatic tension—economic growth has been rapid while protection for migrant workers’ rights is minimal. According to the Ministry of Labor and Social Security, labor disputes in this region for 2005 accounted for nearly 20% of the total number of cases handled nationwide. The law sought to tighten job security, restrict the number of workers dismissed, and guarantee one month’s severance pay for each year of employment. However, as the global financial crisis hit the Pearl River Delta region, what happened to the workers on the world’s factory floor? How are Chinese workers responding to the crisis and to their country’s changing economy and laws?

Founded in 2004, the Pearl River Workers Service Center is a non-profit grassroots organization dedicated to advocating improved labor rights for migrant workers. The Center supports the rights and interests of migrant workers by providing legal consultation, document services, legal training, hospital visits, and cultural recreation.

All are welcome to attend. Snacks, coffee and tea will be served.
For more information please contact Yan Long (longyan@umich.edu).

Posted by zzhu at 02:52 PM

April 08, 2010

Contemporary Chinese Migration to Central Asia: Focus on Kazakhstan



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Posted by zzhu at 11:56 PM

March 31, 2010

CCS Occasional Lecture Series presents: "Contemporary Xinjiang: What do we know? What don't we know?" April 5, 2010



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Posted by zzhu at 07:57 PM

March 17, 2010

Asia Law Society Symposium, March 20, 2010



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Please click on the flier to learn more about the event and to register.

Posted by zzhu at 11:11 AM

March 12, 2010

Lecture and Book Signing - Richard Baum, Department of Political Science, UCLA



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The lecture is part of the Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series.

Posted by zzhu at 05:56 PM

February 19, 2010

The Doris Sloan Memorial Lecture at the University of Michigan Museum of Art



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Secrets to Chinese Painting: Technical Strategies for the Modern World
Dr. Aida Yuen Wong
Sunday, March 14, 2010, 3pm | Helmut Stern Auditorium, UMMA

Aida Yuen Wong, Associate Professor of Fine Arts and Chair of East Asian Studies at Brandeis University, will give the 2010 Doris Sloan Memorial Lecture in conjunction with the exhibition Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century. Dr. Wong will focus on the challenges of the era as artists encountered Western-style modernity and sought to reform Chinese art traditions.

U-M Museum of Art
525 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1354
734-764-0395

Posted by zzhu at 02:33 PM

February 04, 2010

20th Annual Asia Business Conference Keynote Address



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Please click on flier to be directed to the conference Web site.

Posted by zzhu at 01:27 PM

January 26, 2010

The Center for Southeast Asian Studies Presents: Richard Chu on Chinese Merchant Families of Manila

The Center for Southeast Asian Studies invites the public for a Friday-at-Noon lecture

Friday, January 29
Chinese Merchant Families of Manila: Negotiating Identities from the Spanish Colonial Period to the Present
Richard Chu, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

noon – 1:30 pm
1636 SSWB/International Institute


Mariano Limjap and family, circa 1920s. Mariano was a Chinese mestizo whose father was one of the known Chinese "tycoons" of Binondo in the late 19th century. As one of the leading participants in the Reform Movement and the revolutions against Spain and the United States, Mariano's "Chinese-ness" is often neglected in nationalist histories.

"Sangley," "Infieles," "Intsik," "Mestizo," "Chekwa," "Tsinoy." For centuries, outside observers, governments, the Catholic Church, and scholars have called the Chinese in the Philippines different names at different times. Chu deconstructs the meanings of these terms by taking a micro-historical approach, demonstrating how Chinese merchant families in late colonial Manila negotiated their identities as they deployed border-crossing practices to elude or connive at efforts by dominant groups to localize them.

Richard T. Chu received his A.B. from Ateneo de Manila University (1986), his M.A. from Stanford University (1994), and his Ph.D. from University of Southern California (2003). His research focuses on the history of the Chinese in the Philippines, centering on issues of ethnicity, gender, and nationalism. He has just published his first major publication entitled The Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture 1860s to 1930s (E.J. Brill). Chu is Five-College Assistant Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Posted by zzhu at 03:19 PM

January 06, 2010

UMMA Exhibit - Tradition Transformed: Chang Ku-nien, Master Painter of the 20th Century - January 23 through April 18, 2010



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Exhibit: January 23 - April 18, 2010

Curator Talk
Saturday, January 23, 2:00pm
The A. Alfred Taubman Gallery I

Brush Painting Demonstration
Saturday, January 23, 3:00pm
Forum

Guest curator and CCS alumna Wen-chien Chang (PhD 2003, History of Art) will introduce the expressive work of Chang Ku-nien (1906-1987), a versatile and proficient artist from the ancient tradition of Chinese painting. Myong Raymond, who was a student of Chang Ku-nien, will give a demonstration of brush painting.

Please click on image for detailed information.

張穀年 臺灣橫貫公路圖
Chang, Ku-nien (1906 – 1987)
1967
Taiwan Cross-Island Highway – section 1
4 hanging scroll as a panel, ink and color on paper (to be remounted)
Ptg: 152 x 82.5 cm
UMMA Gift of Cheng-yang and Shirley Chang

Posted by zzhu at 12:08 PM

November 24, 2009

CCS Public Lecture Series: "China as a Eurasian Subcontinent: Perspectives on the Past and Future"



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This presentation is part of the CCS co-sponsored conference on "The Nines: Brinks, Cusps, and Perceptions of Possibility - from 1789 to 2009."

Posted by zzhu at 11:49 PM

The Nines: Brinks, Cusps, and Perceptions of Possibility—from 1789 to 2009



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Please click on banner for specific conference panels, abstracts and papers.

Henderson Room, Michigan League

Posted by zzhu at 11:08 PM

China Town Hall 2009



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Posted by zzhu at 10:54 PM

November 04, 2009

The Center for Southeast Asian Studies Presents: Peranakan Musical Cultures in Singapore


Source: The Peranakans - http://www.peranakanmuseum.sg/themuseum/abtperanakans.asp

The Center for Southeast Asian Studies invites you to a Friday-at-Noon lecture:
Peranakan Musical Cultures in Singapore
Lee Tong Soon, Department of Music, Emory University

12:00pm – 1:30pm
Friday, November 6, 2009
1636 SSWB/International Institute

The Peranakan community in Singapore has made much concerted efforts in enhancing public understanding of their culture. With a mix of Chinese and Malay heritage, the roots of the Peranakan communities can be traced back to 17th century Malacca. Since the 1980s, Peranakan culture has been represented in the form of restaurants specializing in their cuisine, revival of Peranakan plays, and permanent exhibits of their architecture, dress, household paraphernalia, and crafts in museums. Such efforts complement, and indeed constitute the broader State's effort to create interests and concern on local heritage, thereby affirming the community as an integral part of the State's conception of a national culture. Peranakan musical practices in Singapore include the performance of music and songs in Peranakan plays, singing of Peranakan hymns and translations of English hymns in the Peranakan patois for Catholic masses, and dondang sayang singing sessions.

Much of the State's representation of Peranakan culture is inclined towards nostalgic and reified perspectives of Peranakan identities and belies the current state of anxiety the community faces in affirming who they are. In this presentation, I would like to explore the ways in which Peranakan music underscores the changing dynamics of Peranakan identities in Singapore. By focusing on musical activities of pre-WW2 amateur Peranakan music groups, I want to show how different musical practices of the community in early 20th century Singapore reveal shifting moments in the meanings, values, and functions of being Peranakan.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies.

Posted by zzhu at 10:45 PM

October 26, 2009

CCS and the Global Lens 2009 Film Series: Zhang Yang's GETTING HOME, Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Posted by zzhu at 11:18 AM

October 21, 2009

Asian Languages and Cultures Graduate Student Colloquium "Reconvening Asia: Embodiment, Transformation, Space"

Date: Friday October 23, 2009
Time: 4-6pm

Location: Rm 2022, Thayer Building

Papers to be given:

1) "The yoga in China: narratives of identity, syncretism, and hybridity and the study of East Asian Buddhism."

Professor Charles D. Orzech
University of North Carolina

2) "South Asian refractions in the prism of Diaspora: from ritual clowns and Sufi processions to the vernacular cosmopolitanism of Bollywood movies."

Professor Pnina Werbner
Keele University
Staffordshire, UK

Papers will be available to distribution, please email harjeets@umich.edu for more information.

Posted by zzhu at 11:33 AM

October 20, 2009

China Entrepreneur Forum, October 31, 2009



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Please click on poster for additional information.

Posted by zzhu at 12:36 PM

October 09, 2009

Hong Kong Today and Beyond: Economy and Opportunities



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Click on poster to RSVP.

Posted by zzhu at 03:02 PM

October 06, 2009

A Community between Two Nations: The Chinese in North Vietnam, 1954-1978

The University of Michigan Center for Southeast Asian Studies Friday-at-Noon lecture presents

Friday, October 9, 2009
"A Community between Two Nations: The Chinese in North Vietnam, 1954-1978"
Han Xiaorong, Butler University

12:00 – 1:30 pm
1636 SSWB/International Institute


Market stall in Hanoi, 2006. Photo by Ryan Hoover.

From the 1950s to the late 1970’s, when the Chinese in several other Southeast Asian nations were experiencing forced assimilation and other difficulties with local governments, the Chinese in North Vietnam were enjoying privileged treatment by the North Vietnamese government. In the late 1970s, when the Chinese in most other Southeast Asian nations had transformed from sojourners to local citizens, most Chinese in North Vietnam were forced out of the country. Prior to Vietnamese reunification in 1975, North Vietnamese leaders adopted lenient policies towards the Chinese community, mainly a reflection of the importance of their war-time relationship with China. But the state’s preferential treatment of the Chinese ultimately contributed to a delay in the assimilation of Chinese residents, who by the end of the 1970s still had not completed the transformation from sojourners to citizens. After reunification, the desire to clarify loyalty, i.e. to “purify” the nation-state, led the Vietnamese government to initiate an aggressive process of forced assimilation. This policy, and the deterioration of relations between Vietnam and China in the late 1970s, triggered an exodus of Chinese residents.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies

Posted by zzhu at 10:54 PM

September 24, 2009

CCS Public Lecture Series - A Lecture by Melissa Chiu



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Posted by zzhu at 04:48 PM

July 29, 2009

UMMA Exhibit - Treasures Rediscovered: Chinese Stone Sculptures - NOW through August 16, 2009



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Posted by zzhu at 01:46 PM

March 16, 2009

Air dates of "The China Price: The True Cost of Chinese Competitive Advantage"

The China Price: The True Cost of Chinese Competitive Advantage has been scheduled to air on the Michigan Channel at the following times:

3/17/2009 at 9PM

3/18/2009 at 2PM

3/22/2009 at 8PM

The Michigan Channel is channel 22 on cable.

See original event info here.

Posted by zzhu at 03:18 PM

February 26, 2009

03/09/09 LECTURE: Cultural Exchange Along the Silk Road

Monday, March 9, 2009
7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.
International Institute
School of Social Work Building
Room 1636, First Floor, 1080 S. University

Brad Farnsworth, CCS faculty associate, gives a multi-media presentation on the general history of the Silk Road with a specific focus on how trade effects culture.

For more information, contact the Education Department at 734.647.6712 or at umsed@umich.edu.

A collaboration with the U-M Ross School of Business and U-M Center for Chinese Studies.

Posted by zzhu at 09:55 AM

February 05, 2009

Peter Purdue, "Violence and Nationalism," 02/13/09

Posted by zzhu at 03:56 PM

Haiping Yan: Chinese Women Writers and the Feminist Imagination: Research Seminar, 02/18/09

Posted by zzhu at 10:07 AM

January 29, 2009

February 17, 2009 - Cross-Currents: the Cinemas of Japan, China and Korea

A Lecture by Tom Vick
Date: Tuesday, 02/17/2009; 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM
Location: Rackham Amphitheater, 915 E. Washington Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Tom Vick explains how the cinemas of Japan, China, and Korea have influenced one another over the years.

In recent years, international co-productions have become more and more common in East Asian cinema. Movie stars from Japan, Korea, Hong Kong and China now regularly form international casts in films such as Peter Chan’s Perhaps Love (which also featured Bollywood choreography), and Wong Kar-wai’s 2046. This talk traces the history of transnational collaboration in East Asian cinema, beginning in the early twentieth century, when the propaganda machinery of Japan’s imperial ambitions laid the groundwork for, and influenced the aesthetics of, film production across the region, to the present day, in which globalization has led to border-crossing movie stars, ambitious international co-productions, and fascinating experiments in popular filmmaking that mix and match genres, styles and cultural influences.

Posted by zzhu at 04:18 PM

The China Price: The True Cost of Chinese Competitive Advantage

A Lecture by Alexandra Harney

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

6:00pm: Reception to meet the author
4th floor Rackham Assembly Hall

7:00pm: Presentation
4th floor Rackham Amphitheater

Rackham Graduate School
915 East Washington Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1106


Free and Open to the Public

The China Price, once the term used to describe the world’s lowest prices, is rising as the cost of everything from labor to energy increases in China. As the country’s manufacturing sector enters another period of transformation, what does this mean for its people, its environment and its economy? What should American policymakers, businesses and shoppers be thinking about as China’s factories change?

Alexandra Harney has been writing about Asia for a decade. The author of The China Price: The True Cost of Chinese Competitive Advantage (Penguin Press, 2008), she covered Hong Kong, China and Japan for The Financial Times and was an editor at the newspaper in London. From 2003 until 2006, she was the FT’s South China correspondent. Alexandra’s work has also been published in many international newspapers and magazines including The Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Far Eastern Economic Review, Marie Claire, Slate and CNN.com. She has contributed to National Public Radio and the BBC World Service and was a regular business and economics commentator on Japanese television. A 1997 cum laude graduate of Princeton University, Alexandra speaks Japanese and Mandarin Chinese.

Posted by batesbe at 01:39 PM

October 30, 2008

Former NYTimes Shanghai bureau chief to speak on China's growing presence in Africa

Howard W. French: "China’s Expanding African Frontier and the Implications for the Continent"
5:30PM, Monday, November 3, 2008
Vandenberg Room, Michigan League
(please note new room)

Reception to follow

Howard W. French is an associate professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. For many years, he was a Senior Writer for The New York Times, where he spent most of a 22-year career as a foreign correspondent, working in and traveling to over 100 countries on five continents. From August 2003 to July 2008, he was the chief of the newspaper’s Shanghai bureau. Prior to this assignment, he headed bureaus in Japan, West and Central Africa, Central America and the Caribbean.

French is the author of A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa (Knopf 2004), which was named non-fiction book of the year by several newspapers. Continent won the 2005 American Library Association Black Caucus Award for Non-Fiction, and was a finalist for both the Lettre Ulysses Award for the Art of Reportage and for the Hurston-Wright Foundation’s non-fiction prize.

Posted by zzhu at 11:31 AM

October 09, 2008

Yasheng Huang book reviewed in The Economist

Yasheng Huang
Sloan School of Management
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Professor Huang will speak at UM on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2008 at 7 pm
His lecture is titled "Rethinking Chinese Reforms"
1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 S. University

From The Economist Print Edition, Oct. 2, 2008:

Chinese capitalism
The Long March Backwards

A surprising new book argues that China is becoming less, not more, of a capitalist economy.

MOST people, particularly those living outside China, assume that the country’s phenomenal growth and increasing global heft are based on a steady, if not always smooth, transition to capitalism. Thirty years of reforms have freed the economy and it can be only a matter of time until the politics follows.

This gradualist view is wrong, according to an important new book by Yasheng Huang, a professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Original research on China is rare, largely because statistics, though plentiful, are notoriously unreliable. Mr Huang has gone far beyond the superficial data on gross domestic product (GDP) and foreign direct investment that satisfy most researchers. Instead, he has unearthed thousands of long-forgotten pages of memoranda and policy documents issued by bank chairmen, businessmen and state officials. In the process he has discovered two Chinas: one, from not so long ago, vibrant, entrepreneurial and rural; the other, today’s China, urban and controlled by the state.

In the 1980s rural China was in the ascendancy. Peasants, far from being tied to the land, as has been assumed, were free to set up manufacturing, distribution and service businesses and these were allowed to retain profits, pay dividends, issue share capital and even a form of stock option. State banks rushed to provide the finance. Nian Guangjiu, a farmer from impoverished Anhui province, built up a business selling sunflower seeds (a popular snack), employed over 100 people and made a million yuan (nearly $300,000) in profit in 1986—just a decade after Mao’s death. Because most of this activity was set up under the misleading label of “Township and Village Enterprises?, Western academics largely failed to spot that these ostensibly collective businesses were, in fact, private.

But then, in 1989, came the Tiananmen Square protests. A generation of policymakers who had grown up in the countryside, led by Zhao Ziyang, were swept away by city boys, notably the president, Jiang Zemin, and Zhu Rongji, his premier. Both men hailed from Shanghai and it was the “Shanghai model? that dominated the 1990s: rapid urban development that favoured massive state-owned enterprises and big foreign multinational companies. The countryside suffered. Indigenous entrepreneurs were starved of funds and strangled with red tape. Like many small, private businessmen, Mr Nian was arrested and his firm shut down.

True, China’s cities sprouted gleaming skyscrapers, foreign investment exploded and GDP continued to grow. But it was at a huge cost. As the state reversed course, taxing the countryside to finance urban development, growth in average household income and poverty eradication slowed while income differences and social tensions widened. Rural schools and hospitals were closed, with the result that between 2000 and 2005 the number of illiterate adults increased by 30m. According to Mr Huang, the worst weaknesses of China’s state-led capitalism—a reliance on creaking state companies rather than more efficient private ones, a weak financial sector, pollution and rampant corruption—are increasingly distorting the economy.

But what about the growing cohort of Chinese companies starting to strut the world stage? Surely that is evidence of a healthy and expanding private economy. Mr Huang’s evidence shows that, on closer inspection, these firms are either not really Chinese or not really private. Lenovo, a computer group, has succeeded because it was controlled, financed and run not from mainland China but from Hong Kong (a happy legacy of the founder’s family connections there—not something enjoyed by most Chinese businessmen). The subsidiaries of Haier, a white-goods maker, were also put out of reach of mainland bureaucrats early on. Wahaha, a food producer, Galanz, a maker of microwave ovens, and many others all depended on foreign protection and capital to grow and escape state strictures.

Indeed one of the main, and underappreciated, functions of foreign investment in China has been to play venture capitalist to domestic entrepreneurs. As for Huawei, a telecoms group and one of China’s much vaunted “global? companies, its structure and links to the state are so convoluted that the most diligent China-watchers have little idea if it is a private or state firm. They do, however, agree that Huawei’s opacity is a microcosm of China’s distorted economy.

Could China genuinely embrace entrepreneurial capitalism again, as it did in the 1980s? Its current leaders under President Hu Jintao, who cut his teeth in Guizhou and Tibet, two of the poorest and most rural provinces, talk about supporting the countryside and reducing social inequality. But nothing much has been done. China’s deep problems demand institutional and political reform. Sadly, as Beijing’s heavy-handed control of the Olympics suggests, there is scant hope of that.

http://www.economist.com/books/displaystory.cfm?story_id=12333103

Posted by moyera at 04:11 PM

October 01, 2008

Winners, we have them!

Congratulations to the 2008 CCS Photo Competition Winners!

First Place – Marilyn Mai, Homeland Pride
Second Place – Shu-li Huang, A Family of Silver Artisans
Third Place – Jason Lin, Broken Home, Broken Family

The theme of this year's competition was "Home and Family." All the entries, including the winning photographs, are on display in the International Institute Gallery October 1-31, 2008.

Posted by zzhu at 05:01 PM

August 27, 2008

Ai Xiaoming

Visual Representation, Memory and Public Interest

Tuesday, September 30, 2008
4:00 pm
1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Ai Xiaoming
Department of Chinse Language and Literature
Sun Yat-sen University

Ai Xiaoming is a professor in the Department of Chinese Language and Literature, Sun Yat-sen University in Guangdon Province, China, and head of the Sex/Gender Education Forum established in 2003.

She is a feminist academic, a human rights activist, and director of several documentary films on issues of health, human rights, the legal system and the election system in China, among other topoics.

Films she has directed include Care and Love(2007), the story of a villager who contracted AIDS from a blood transfusion during childbirth and her attempts to seek legal redress against the hospital; The Epic of Central Plains (2006) on villagers in Henan Province who contracted AIDS while seeking to alleviate their poverty by selling their blood, and Tai Shi Village(2006) on the events surrounding a village's attempts to remove their appointed local officials.

Professor Ai's film Care and Love will be shown in the CCS Chinese Documentary Film Series on Saturday, October 4 at 7:00 pm in Auditorium A of Angell Hall. The film series is free and open to the public.

For more information, please contact the UM Center for Chinese Studies, 734 764 6308.

Posted by moyera at 11:30 AM

Yasheng Huang

Rethinking Chinese Reforms

Thursday, October 23, 2008
7:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Yasheng Huang
Sloan School of Management
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The year 2008 marks the 30th anniversary of Chinese reforms.

It is high time to take stock of and assess where the Chinese economy is today. This presentation will show that much of the foundation of China's miracle was laid down in the 1980s and experienced substantial reversals in the 1990s. Even after 30 years of reforms, the reforms are far from complete.

Yasheng Huang teaches international management at Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author of Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics (Cambridge 2008). In collaborative projects with other scholars, Professor Huang is conducting research on engineering education and human capital formation in China and India and on entrepreneurship. Professor Huang is the recipient of the Social Science-MacArthur Foundation Fellowship and the National Fellowship.

Posted by moyera at 11:23 AM