April 17, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Sean Hsiang-lin Lei


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Sean Hsiang-lin Lei
Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University

Neither Donkey nor Horse: Medicine and the Struggle over China’s Modernity

April 22, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk aims to answer one question: How was Chinese medicine transformed from an antithesis of modernity in the early twentieth century into a potent symbol and vehicle for China’s exploration of its own modernity half a century later? Instead of viewing this transition as a derivative of the political history of modern China, it argues that China’s medical history had a life of its own and at times even influenced the ideological struggle over the definition of China’s modernity and the Chinese state. Far from being a “remnant” of pre-modern China, Chinese medicine in the 20th century co-evolved with Western medicine and the Nationalist state, undergoing a profound transformation – institutionally, epistemologically, and materially – that resulted in the creation of a modern Chinese medicine.

Nevertheless, this newly re-assembled modern Chinese medicine was stigmatized by its opponents at that time as a mongrel form of medicine that was “neither donkey nor horse,” because the discourse of modernity rejected the possibility of productive crossbreeding between the modern and the traditional. Against the hegemony of this discourse, the definitive feature of this new medicine was the fact that it took the discourse of modernity (and the accompanying knowledge of biomedicine) seriously but survived the resulting epistemic violence by way of negotiation and self-innovation. In this sense, the historic rise of this “neither donkey nor horse” medicine constitutes a local innovation of crucial importance for the notion of China’s modernity, challenging us to imagine different kinds of relationships between science and non-Western knowledge traditions.

Sean Hsiang-lin Lei is Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taiwan and Member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, 2013-14. He specializes in the history of medicine, including both biomedicine and traditional medicine, in modern China and Taiwan. His first book, Neither Donkey nor Horse: Medicine and the Struggle over China’s Modernity (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming in 2014) seeks to understand how Chinese medicine was transformed from an antithesis of modernity in the early twentieth century into a potent symbol and vehicle for China’s exploration of it own modernity half a century later. His on-going research investigates the changing conceptions of the body, selfhood, and moral community through the history of two competing diseases: modern Tuberculosis and laobing (wasting disorders), a traditional disease that is caused primarily by various forms of overwork. He teaches at the Institute of Science, Technology and Society (STS) at Yangming University in Taiwan and co-edited two STS Readers (2005). Drawing on historical studies, he explores larger theoretical issues such as the relationship between modern science and non-Western knowledge traditions, the emergence of the capitalist body in China, and the role of techno-science in the making of modern East Asia.

This talk is co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies and by the American Council of Learned Societies/Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation and the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures as a part of the series "Global and Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Chinese Medicine."

Posted by zzhu at 11:47 AM

April 02, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Scott Tong


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Scott Tong
2013-14 Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow, University of Michigan
Correspondent and former Shanghai bureau chief, Marketplace public radio

(Please Note Change of Speaker: Due to circumstances beyond her control, Minyuan Zhao from the U-M Ross School of Business had to cancel her talk originally scheduled on this day.)

China Reporter’s Notebook: When the story gets personal – a journalist and adoptive parent perspective on a baby trafficking/international adoption scandal

April 8, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Marketplace public radio correspondent Scott Tong, former China bureau chief and current Knight-Wallace journalism fellow at Michigan, shares his perspective on a memorable story from his four-year stint in Shanghai. Tong tracked down a man convicted of selling babies to Hunan orphanages in China’s international adoption program. The investigation and paper chase led to a lengthy radio piece, and a subsequent hunt for the true origins of his adopted daughter.

For the past decade, Scott Tong has served as on-air correspondent for Marketplace, the daily business show on public radio stations across the country. He founded the program’s Shanghai bureau in 2006, serving there for four years. Now, he reports on energy, resources and global economics for the program’s Sustainability Desk. Tong has reported on everything from the “consumer arms race” in America, to the 2012 Horn of Africa famine, to Japan’s earthquake and tsunami from 2011. Public radio listeners have heard his stories from more than a dozen countries. Prior to Marketplace, he worked as a producer for the PBS NewsHour and as a congressional staffer. Tong is a graduate of Georgetown University and lives in Arlington, Virginia with his wife and three children.

Posted by zzhu at 03:24 PM

March 21, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Xuefei Ren


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Xuefei Ren
Associate Professor of Sociology and Global Urban Studies
Michigan State University

Urban Governance and Citizen Rights in India and China

April 1, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Over the past three decades, large-scale and high-speed urbanization has posed severe governance challenges in post-liberalization India and post-socialist China. The different modes of urban development in China and India present excellent cases to theorize urban governance and citizen rights in the developing world. This talk presents research and findings from my current project on urbanization and local governance in China and India since the late nineteenth century. The project challenges the widely held notion that Chinese urban development occurs in a top-down manner because of one-Party rule, whereas Indian urban development occurs through bottom-up, or “subaltern” strategies based upon democratic contestations. Through case studies on informal settlements and land acquisitions in Delhi, Mumbai, Guangzhou, and Shanghai during the past two decades, I demonstrate how urbanization in both countries has enabled a reassembling of citizen rights with simultaneous processes of inclusion and exclusion. In democratic India, the outcomes of urban renewal and land disputes are far from certain, as political parties use property development schemes to agitate and compete with opposition parties. In contrast, in non-democratic China, citizens are not necessarily powerless victims of dispossession, as they often mobilize the media and appeal to higher level state institutions to subvert development schemes promoted by the local state. Overall, cities in China and India have become strategic sites for the remaking of citizenship under twenty-first century capitalism.

Xuefei Ren is Associate Professor of Sociology and Global Urban Studies at Michigan State University. She received her BA in Comparative Literature, MA in Urban Planning from Tokyo Metropolitan University, and PhD in Sociology from the University of Chicago. Her research interests are urbanization, governance, architecture and the built environment, and international development. She has published widely in urban studies journals and is the author of two books. Her first book, Building Globalization: Transnational Architecture Production in Urban China (University of Chicago Press, 2011), won the Best Book Award from the Political Economy of the World System Section and an Honorable Mention for the Robert Park Award in the Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. Her latest book, Urban China (Polity Press, 2013), is listed as an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice magazine in 2014. She is a columnist for Thinker magazine in Beijing and has been a residential fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC.

This presentation is co-sponsored by the U-M Center for South Asian Studies, organizer of the Winter Term 2014 LSA Theme Semester “India in the World.” For more information on their scheduled events, please contact their center at 734-615-4059; csas@umich.edu; or access their website at: www.ii.umich.edu/csas.

Posted by zzhu at 12:02 AM

March 13, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Lynette H. Ong


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Lynette H. Ong
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Toronto

Contracting out Violence: Patron-Client Relationship between the Government and Thugs in China

March 18, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Thuggery, gangsterism, and dark societies (hei shehui) are on the rise in China. They are increasingly recruited by the government as an extralegal coercive force, carrying out violent actions on “uncooperative” citizens. Thugs are frequently hired by local governments to pressurize and bulldoze ‘nail households’ using coercive force in order to clear land for urban development. Land-related protests have become the primary cause of social unrest. Gangsters are also often associated with the infamous city patrol (chengguan), whose brutal crackdown on street vendors often sparks public anger. This paper explores the context in which government-related thuggery and violence have arisen, and its implications for governance and state legitimacy. A symbiosis is formed between the government and thugs where the weak state routinely coopts or enlists the help of thugs or “security companies” to carry out certain policies with coercive force, and the thugs engage in such activities for a profit. Drawing from Weber’s idea that only a state has legitimate monopoly over violence, the Chinese government has lost its monopoly over violence and its legitimacy in the eyes of the citizens. Such a symbiotic relationship is ultimately detrimental to the state, as it breeds a vicious cycle. As legitimacy erodes, the state needs to progressively recruit thugs to deal with rebellious citizens, and repress popular grievances, which will give rise to further social instability.

Lynette H. Ong is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, and Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Prosper or Perish: Credit and Fiscal Systems in Rural China (Cornell University Press, 2012). Her publications have appeared in Comparative Politics, China Quarterly, International Political Science Review, Foreign Affairs, Journal of East Asian Studies, Asian Survey and Pacific Affairs. Her opinion pieces have also appeared in the Foreign Affairs, Far Eastern Economic Review, China Economic Review, China Economic Quarterly, East Asia Forum, Asia Sentinel, New Mandala and Asia Times Online. Her theoretical interests are comparative politics, politics of development, political economy of finance and public finance. Her regional interests are primarily China, followed by East and Southeast Asia. She is fluent in Mandarin Chinese, Bahasa Malaysia, and various Chinese dialects. She was An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies in 2008-09. She received her PhD from the Australian National University.

Posted by zzhu at 03:55 PM

March 07, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Akiyama Tamako


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Akiyama Tamako
Adjunct lecturer, Language Center
Rikkyo University

The Liberty Coerced by Limitation: Subtitling Independent Chinese Documentary

March 11, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Facing extreme limitations in space and time, subtitlers often mourn the many limitations they are forced to deal with. They look jealously at the translators of literature, who appear so free. But the strictures of subtitling can also produce a certain kind of freedom. This talk will examine the subtitles for several films by director Wang Bing to explore the liberatory possibilities secreted away in their translations.

Akiyama Tamako teaches at Rikkyo University and is widely known for her subtitling and interpretation for Chinese cinema. She has been a close observer of Chinese thought, cinema and art since the 1990s. Supporting these artists' efforts through translation and interpretation, she has experienced their many turning points together—helping to introduce the forefront of Chinese art and film to Japan. Her many translations include Zhang Yuan's Crazy English (1999), Wang Bing's Tie Xi Qu: West of the Tracks (2003) and Fengmin: a Chinese Memoir (2007), and Cong Feng's Dr. Ma's Country Clinic (2008).

Posted by zzhu at 06:14 PM

February 20, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Mary Gallagher


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Mary Gallagher
Associate Professor of Political Science
Director, Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan

Use the Bottom to Squeeze the Middle: How to Understand Social Policy in Contemporary China

February 25, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk examines how the Chinese government has developed strategies to enhance its capacity to govern despite the lack of democratic mechanisms that provide feedback and bottom-up evaluation. In the arena of labor and social policies, the government has combined high standards with extensive publicity and education, which encourages social mobilization around newly granted rights and entitlements. A key question in the future is whether the government can manage the rising expectations that accompany social mobilization.

Mary Gallagher is an associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan where she is also the director of the Center for Chinese Studies. She is also a faculty associate at the Center for Comparative Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research. From 2012-2013, she was a visiting scholar at the Koguan Law School at Shanghai Jiaotong University.

Professor Gallagher received her Ph.D in politics in 2001 from Princeton University and her B.A. from Smith College in 1991. She was a foreign student in China in 1989 at Nanjing University. She also taught at the Foreign Affairs College in Beijing from 1996-1997. She was a Fulbright Research Scholar from 2003 to 2004 at East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai, China where she worked on her current project, The Rule of Law in China: If They Build It, Who Will Come? This project examines the legal mobilization of Chinese workers. It was funded by the Fulbright Association and the National Science Foundation.

Her book Contagious Capitalism: Globalization and the Politics of Labor in China was published by Princeton University Press in 2005. She has published articles in World Politics, Law and Society Review, Studies in Comparative International Development, and Asian Survey. She is the co-editor of several new volumes on Chinese law and politics, including Chinese Justice: Civil Dispute Resolution in Contemporary China (Cambridge 2011) and From Iron Rice Bowl to Informalization: Markets, Workers, and the State in a Changing China (Cornell 2011).

Posted by zzhu at 03:31 PM

February 10, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Scott Kennedy


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Scott Kennedy
Associate Professor, Departments of Political Science
Associate Professor, Departments of East Asian Languages & Cultures
Indiana University

From Ruletakers to Rulemakers: Chinese and Global Governance

February 18, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Chinese government agencies, companies, and NGO's are become much more significant players in every area of global governance, from trade remedies to the setting of technical standards to rules governing transnational investment. This presentation will explain how effectively Chinese are learning, utilizing and shaping the rules of the game in these and other areas. Chinese effectiveness varies widely across regime areas, and different kinds of Chinese companies have become more adept than others in their involvement. At the same time, China's political system presents substantial obstacles to all Chinese being more effective and the country as a whole playing more of a leadership role globally.

Scott Kennedy (Ph.D., George Washington University, 2002) is Director of the Research Center for Chinese Politics & Business (RCCPB), Associate Professor in the Departments of Political Science and East Asian Languages & Cultures, and Adjunct Professor in the Kelley School of Business's Department of Business Economics and Public Policy at Indiana University. His research focuses on economic policymaking and global governance. He is author of The Business of Lobbying in China (Harvard University Press, 2005); and editor of (with Shuaihua Cheng), From Rule Takers to Rule Makers: The Growing Role of Chinese in Global Governance (2012); Beyond the Middle Kingdom: Comparative Perspectives on China’s Capitalist Transformation (Stanford University Press, 2011); and China Cross Talk: The American Debate over China Policy since Normalization: A Reader (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003). He has published articles in China Quarterly, China Journal, Journal of Contemporary China, China Economic Quarterly, Business and Society, Political Science Quarterly, World Policy Journal, and Problems of Post-Communism. He also writes a regular column for GKDragonomics on Chinese economic policy. For more information, see chinatrack.typepad.com.

Posted by zzhu at 01:59 PM

February 06, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Micah Muscolino


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Micah Muscolino
Associate Professor of History
Georgetown University

Earth, Water, Power: The Ecology of War in North China's Henan Province, 1938-1950

February 11, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In the most environmentally damaging act of warfare in world history, Chinese Nationalist armies under Chiang Kai-shek broke the Yellow River’s dikes in June 1938 to block a Japanese military offensive, throwing water control systems into disarray and causing devastating floods that persisted until World War II came to an end. Based on the speaker's forthcoming book, this talk explores the ecological history of the river’s strategic diversion and its aftermath to engage with larger issues related to the interplay between war and the environment.

Micah Muscolino is Associate Professor of History at Georgetown University. His area of expertise is the environmental history of late imperial and modern China. Before coming to Georgetown he taught for two years at Saint Mary's College of California. He spent 2010-2011 as a member of the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ with support from a Mellon Fellowship for Assistant Professors and the National Endowment for the Humanities. His first book Fishing Wars and Environmental Change in Late Imperial and Modern China, was published in 2009. He has recently completed a second book manuscript titled "The Ecology of War in North China's Henan Province, 1938-1950" that investigates the environmental history of World War II and the Chinese Civil War of 1946-1949 by focusing on the socio-ecological consequences of the Nationalist military's strategic diversion of the Yellow River in 1938 and its aftermath.

Posted by zzhu at 11:58 PM

February 03, 2014

CANCELED: Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Wendy Swartz


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Please note that this talk has been CANCELED due to weather-related complications. We hope to reschedule Professor Swartz's talk next academic term.


Wendy Swartz
Associate Professor of Chinese Literature
Rutgers University

The Intertextual Brush: Philosophy in Early Medieval Chinese Poetry

February 4, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

A meaningful study of intertextuality must involve examining how a text functions as part of a network of textual relations, and is thus not reducible to influence studies, or a mere tracing of sources. It has special significance and ramifications for early medieval Chinese literary history in light of the fluid boundaries of textual traditions and the dynamic interactions among diverse, expanding repertoires of literary and cultural meanings. It is within this context of a growing body of literary sources and an interconnectedness of not only different intellectual repertoires (e.g. Confucian, Lao-Zhuang, and Buddhist) but also different branches of learning (e.g. philosophy, poetry) that my lecture will examine how writers best made use of diverse, heterogeneous sources suited to their needs.

Wendy Swartz is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature at Rutgers University. She has also taught at Columbia University and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research is primarily on early medieval Chinese poetry, poetics, and literary criticism. She is the author of Reading Tao Yuanming: Shifting Paradigms of Historical Reception (427-1900) (Harvard University Asia Center, 2008), the principal editor of Early Medieval China: A Sourcebook (Columbia University Press, 2014), and has published numerous articles on early medieval literature in leading American journals.

Posted by zzhu at 11:36 AM

January 23, 2014

Winter 2014 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Manjari Chatterjee Miller


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Manjari Chatterjee Miller
Assistant Professor of International Relations
Boston University

Wronged by Empire: Colonial Memories and Victimhood in India's and China's Foreign Policy Today

January 28, 2014
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Manjari Chatterjee Miller is an assistant professor of international relations at Boston University. She joined BU completing her PhD at Harvard University, and a post-doctoral fellowship at Princeton University. She is the author of Wronged by Empire: Post-Imperial Ideology and Foreign Policy in India and China (Stanford University Press: 2013).

Miller’s research has appeared in Foreign Affairs, the New York Times, Asian Security, Foreign Policy, the Indian Express and the Christian Science Monitor. Her work has been supported by grants from the East-West Center, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, the South Asia Initiative, the Fairbank Center, the Woodrow Wilson School and, the US Department of Education.

This presentation is co-sponsored by the U-M Center for South Asian Studies, organizer of the Winter Term 2014 LSA Theme Semester “India in the World.” For more information on the events planned for the theme semester, please contact their center at 734-615-4059; csas@umich.edu ; or access its website at: www.ii.umich.edu/csas.

Posted by zzhu at 12:46 PM

November 21, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Matthew Mosca


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Matthew Mosca
Assistant Professor of History
The College of William and Mary

Qing Perceptions of British India and the Dilemmas of Frontier Integration, 1760-1842

December 3, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

After 1760, an increasing portion of the Qing frontier abutted areas in which the British and Russian empires exerted direct or indirect influence. This talk, concentrating primarily on the case of India, examines the bureaucratic, strategic, and intellectual challenges posed for the Qing state by the expansion of its rivals. In particular, it considers how a government that had been accustomed to managing a diverse and fragmented borderland adapted to the fact that the activities of other empires, evident across widely separated and non-contiguous regions, formed part of an increasingly integrated web of imperial competition.

Matthew W. Mosca received his PhD in History and East Asian Languages from Harvard University in 2008. He is currently assistant professor in the Lyon G. Tyler Department of History at the College of William and Mary. In the 2013-2014 academic year he holds a Mellon Fellowship for Assistant Professors at the School of Historical Studies, Institute of Advanced Study.

This presentation is co-sponsored by the U-M Center for South Asian Studies, organizer of the Winter Term 2014 LSA Theme Semester “India in the World.” For more information, please contact their center at 734-615-4059; csas@umich.edu ; or access their website at: www.ii.umich.edu/csas.

Posted by zzhu at 10:46 PM

November 14, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Independent Film in China


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Abe Mark Nornes, Yi Sicheng, Cong Feng, and Mao Chengyu

Independent Film in China: Yunfest and Beyond

November 19, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Professor Markus Nornes, Chair of the U-M Department of Screen Arts and Cultures, invites you to an interview with Yi Sicheng, the organizer of Yunfest, of one of the most influential independent film festivals in China, and two film directors whose work exemplify the current generation of Chinese independent film making today. The interview will be partially in Chinese with consecutive English translation.

The event is co-sponsored by the U-M Departments of Anthropology and Screen Arts and Cultures, as well as by the Fairbank Center at Harvard University.

Posted by zzhu at 03:50 PM

November 07, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Nicholas Howson


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Nicholas Howson
Professor of Law
Michigan Law School

Quack Corporate Governance as Traditional Chinese Medicine-Firm Organization and the Consequences of China's Unreconstructed Political Economy

November 12, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

From the start of the PRC’s “corporatization” project in the late 1980s, a Chinese corporate governance regime subject to increasingly “enabling” legal norms has been determined by “mandatory” regulations imposed by the PRC securities regulator, the CSRC. Indeed, the Chinese corporate law system has been cannibalized by all-encompassing securities regulation directed at corporate governance, at least for companies with listed stock. This presentation traces the path of that sustained intervention, and makes a case – wholly contrary to the “quack corporate governance” critique much aired in the U.S. – that for the PRC this phenomenon is necessary and appropriate, and benign. That analysis in turn reveals a great deal about: the development of Chinese law and legal institutions after 1979; China’s contemporary political economy; the true identity of the firm under the PRC “corporatization without privatization” program; the normative character and function of corporate law across the globe; and the ways in which state intervention may protect against state abuse of power and enable greater private autonomy.

Nicholas Calcina Howson is a Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School who has also taught at the Berkeley (Boalt), Columbia, Cornell, and Harvard Law Schools. Howson earned his B.A. from Williams College (1983) and his J.D. from Columbia Law School (1988). Professor Howson has spent many years living in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), both as a scholar – working at Shanghai’s Fudan University (1983-85), Beijing University and the Chinese University of Politics and Law (1988) and Shanghai’s East China University of Politics and Law (2008) -- and as a practicing lawyer based in Beijing (1990-92 and 1996-2003). A former partner of the New York-based international law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP, he worked out of that firm's New York, Paris, London and Beijing Offices, finally as a managing partner of the firm's China Practice based in the Chinese capital.

Posted by zzhu at 09:59 PM

October 30, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Paul Copp


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Paul Copp
Associate Professor of Chinese Religion and Thought
University of Chicago

Seals and the Sources of Chinese Buddhism

November 5, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Stamp seals, both as physical objects and especially as metaphors, are nearly everywhere in Buddhism. This is easy to understand: seals had long been central to the practices of the civilizations, Indian and Chinese most prominently, in which Buddhism took on its most powerfully influential cultural forms. In this talk I will explore the broad history of religious seal practice in which ninth and tenth century Chinese Buddhist ritualists compiled versions of a manual for the making and use of Buddhist talismanic seals found among the Dunhuang manuscripts.

Posted by zzhu at 04:41 PM

October 24, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Yuan-kang Wang


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Yuan-kang Wang
Associate Professor
Department of Sociology
Western Michigan University

International Relations and Chinese History: The Rise of Qing China

October 29, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Can Chinese history tell us anything about China’s rise today? This talk will examine how the Manchus of Qing China rose to preeminence and established regional hegemony in East Asia. By integrating international relations theory with Chinese history, this talk will demonstrate how a rising state expands political interests abroad and establishing rules of the game for the system.

Posted by zzhu at 09:44 PM

October 17, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Nicolas Tackett


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Nicolas Tackett
Assistant Professor of History
University of California, Berkeley

Marriage Networks and the Geography of Power in Ninth-Century China

October 22, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

How does one account for the long-term survival of the medieval Chinese aristocratic clans despite important institutional developments, including the expanded use of the civil service examinations? How does one then explain the sudden collapse of these families at the turn of the tenth century? By exploiting a large prosopographic database, this paper will explore how a better understanding of the geographic distribution of political power and of the Tang political elite's social networks can help resolve these questions.

Posted by zzhu at 11:45 AM

October 02, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Tze-Lan Sang


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Tze-Lan Sang
Professor of Chinese Literature and Media Studies
Michigan State University

Globalization and Taiwanese Women's Documentaries

October 8, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In an age of globalization characterized by uneven development and flexible accumulation, documentary filmmakers all over the world have found significant issues to investigate and critique. Documentary filmmaking in Taiwan is no exception to the current phenomenon, having confronted issues ranging from industries and markets to the human and environmental costs of development. In this regard, female documentarists’ contribution deserves a special examination--how have they dealt with complex issues at the intersection of gender, class, regional and other politics in the global era?

Posted by zzhu at 05:53 PM

September 26, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Emily Wilcox


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Emily Wilcox
Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Studies, U-M

China's Contemporary Dance Scene

October 1, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

China’s contemporary dance scene is one of the most dynamic and diverse in the world. Boasting styles as varied as military dances, historical costume dramas, minority dance productions, and modern experimental works, “concert dance” in China is a wide category that must itself be interrogated to begin to gain any understanding of dance in China in the 21st century. In this talk, I introduce major dance works presented in Beijing during the summer of 2013, together with the broader category each work represents, to provide an outline of the basic genres and institutions that currently constitute China’s contemporary dance scene.

Posted by zzhu at 05:20 PM

September 19, 2013

Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Lydia Li


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Lydia Li
Associate Professor of Social Work, U-M

Successful Aging in Transitional China: Accomplishments and Challenges

September 24, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Successful aging is a very relevant topic for China, given that it has the largest elderly population in the world and one of the fastest rates of population aging in human history. In this talk, Professor Li will address three questions. First, has there been more success in successful aging since China began the economic reform in the late 1970s? Second, who among those living in contemporary China are more and less likely to age successfully and why? Third, how would the trend of successful aging in China be affected by rapid industrialization and urbanization? She will review the literature, especially empirical studies, to draw answers to the questions. Challenges to realizing successful aging in China will be discussed.

Posted by zzhu at 07:40 PM

April 11, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Volker Scheid


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Volker Scheid
Professor of East Asian Medicines, School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, UK

Chinese Medicine for Global Ills? The History of Yu and its Significance in the Treatment of Depression

April 16, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies and by the American Council of Learned Societies/Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation and the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures as a part of the series "Global and Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Chinese Medicine."

The World Health Organization has declared depression to be a pandemic that will be a major cause of morbidity in the 21st century. Although depression was virtually un-diagnosed (and therefore unknown) in China before the 1990s, physicians of Chinese medicine now claim that they can use centuries-old traditions to successfully treat it. They base their claims on a presumed equivalence between the Chinese medical concept of yu (“constraint”) and the biomedical concept of depression. This talk examines the historical processes that allowed doctors to equate yu and depression, and it examines what this convergence reveals about Chinese medicine, psychiatry, and constructions of gender.

Volker Scheid is Professor of East Asian Medicines at the School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster and Director of its EASTmedicine Research Centre. A practitioner of Chinese medicine with over 25 years of clinical experience, Dr. Scheid also holds a Ph.D. in medical anthropology from the University of Cambridge. His numerous publications include two acclaimed studies of the history and anthropology of Chinese medicine: Chinese Medicine in Contemporary China: Plurality and Synthesis (Duke University Press, 2002) and Currents of Tradition in Chinese Medicine: 1626-2006 (Eastland Press, 2007). Dr. Scheid currently serves as president of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM), a forum that seeks to foster collaborations between practitioners and scholars of Asian medicines.

Posted by zzhu at 05:12 PM

April 03, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Ming Xu


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Ming Xu
Assistant Professor
School of Natural Resources and the Environment
University of Michigan

China’s Exports and Global CO2 Emissions

April 9, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

China has contributed significantly to the increase of global CO2 emissions in the past couple of decades. Part of China's emissions have been the result of increasing exports, or increasing consumption in countries. I will talk about how to measure such emissions embodied in trade and its implications on global climate governance.

Ming Xu received his BS and MS from Tsinghua University and PhD from Arizona State University, all in environmental engineering. Before joining U-M in 2010, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Brook Byers Institute for Sustainable Systems at Georgia Institute of Technology. At U-M, he is an assistant professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Posted by zzhu at 05:16 PM

March 25, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Xun (Brian) Wu


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Xun (Brian) Wu
Assistant Professor of Strategy
Ross School of Business, University of Michigan

Institutional Barriers and Industry Dynamics

April 2, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This study demonstrates new entrants exhibit higher productivity but also higher exit hazard than incumbents in post-liberalization China. We argue this seemingly paradoxical relationship is attributable to institutional barriers, defined as the hindrance in the institutional environment that prevents market selection forces to function. New entrants require higher productivity to compensate for those institutional barriers, which in turn implies a higher exit hazard after controlling for productivity. Our empirical findings support this argument, and further show that the differences in productivity and exit hazard between new entrants and incumbents become smaller where and when institutional barriers recede. By integrating economic and institutional perspectives, we highlight the importance of institutional factors in shaping industry evolution.

Xun (Brian) Wu is an Assistant Professor of Strategy at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. He received his B.S. from Tsinghua University in China, M.Sc. from National University of Singapore, and Ph.D. from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania prior to joining the Ross School of Business in 2007. Brian Wu's work focuses on the interactions of firm capabilities, corporate strategy, and industry evolution. This research addresses issues such as market entry, corporate diversification, firm innovation, and entrepreneurship. His work has been published or is forthcoming in Management Science and Strategic Management Journal. His research has also been recognized with several awards, including the AOM Technology and Innovation Management (TIM) Division Stephan Schrader Best Conference Paper Award and the US Small Business Administration Best Student Paper Award. In addition, his dissertation is a finalist for the INFORMS Organization Science Dissertation Proposal Competition. More recently, he was nominated for the Ross Junior Faculty Research Award, was a runner-up for the Academy of Management Technology and Innovation Management Division Past Chairs Emerging Scholar Award, and won the 3M Nontenured Faculty Award.

Posted by zzhu at 05:06 PM

March 21, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Martin Dimitrov


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Martin Dimitrov
Associate Professor of Political Science
Tulane University

State Capacity and the Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights Laws in China

March 26, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

China has some of the highest levels of copyright piracy and trademark counterfeiting in the world. What does this mean for our assessment of state capacity in China? Is the state unable to enforce its own laws? This paper approaches state capacity by focusing on intellectual property rights, which encompass copyrights, trademarks, and patents. The paper shows that, on a per capita basis, China already provides the highest volume of trademark and copyright enforcement in the world. Unfortunately, this enforcement is of a low quality, and only serves to perpetuate piracy and counterfeiting. In contrast, patent enforcement is low in volume, but has a high quality. This paper develops a theory of state capacity that identifies the conditions that allow the Chinese state to be simultaneously weak and strong vis-à-vis the protection of intellectual property rights (IPR). It argues that some pockets of the IPR enforcement apparatus are capable of delivering high-quality specialized enforcement of IPR laws and regulations, whereas others provide duplicative and ultimately ineffective enforcement. The paper is based on extensive interviews in China, as well as on a range of printed sources in Chinese.

Martin Dimitrov is Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University. He is the author of Piracy and the State: The Politics of Intellectual Property Rights in China (Cambridge University Press, 2009; paperback 2012) and of Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Communist Resilience in Asia and Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2013). He is currently working on a monograph entitled Dictatorship and Information: Autocratic Regime Resilience in Communist Europe and China. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University in 2004, and was previously an Assistant Professor of Government at Dartmouth College. He has been awarded residential fellowships from the American Academy in Berlin; the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; the Hoover Institution (declined); the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Notre Dame; the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford; the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard; and the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard. Dimitrov is also a member of the National Committee on United States - China Relations.

Posted by zzhu at 07:05 PM

March 13, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Martin Powers


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Roy Lichtenstein, Brushstroke, 1996, Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution.

Martin Powers
Sally Michelson Davidson University Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures
University of Michigan

The Cultural Politics of the Brushstroke

March 19, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

n both modern and pre-modern critical writing, both “East and West,” the brushstroke eventually came to be characterized as a vehicle of personal expression in defiance of the "stifling" rules of naturalistic representation. By the mid-twentieth century, the image of the bohemian master flinging paint would have been familiar to both Chinese and European art lovers. It doesn’t follow, however, that the seductive rhetoric of the brushstroke has been thus deconstructed, or understood. This paper surveys the cultural politics of the brushstroke in debates between and among European, American, and Chinese intellectuals, over a period of four centuries.

Martin Powers is Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures at the University of Michigan, and former Director of the Center for Chinese Studies. In 1993 his Art and Political Expression in Early China, Yale University Press, received the Levenson Prize for the best book in pre-twentieth century Chinese Studies. His research focuses on the role of the arts in the history of human relations in China, with an emphasis on issues of personal agency and social justice. His Pattern and Person: Ornament, Society, and Self in Classical China, was published by Harvard University Press East Asian Series in 2006 and has been awarded the Levenson Prize for 2008. He has served on numerous national committees, including NEH, ACLS, and the advisory board of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. He has taught in the History Departments at Tsinghua, Peking University, and Zhejiang University, and has published articles and essays in multiple venues in Chinese, including an editorial series in the journal of culture and current affairs, Du Shu. In 2009 he was resident at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton writing a book on the role of "China" in the cultural politics of the English Enlightenment. In the Spring of 2012, he delivered the Wang Guowei Memorial Lectures at Tsinghua. Together with Dr. Katherine Tsiang, he is co-editing the Blackwell Companion to Chinese Art.

Posted by zzhu at 07:15 PM

February 28, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Sarah Schneewind


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Sarah Schneewind
Associate Professor of History
UC San Diego

Father and Mother of the People: Thinking Through Ming Bureaucratic Paternalism

March 12, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

By Ming times, personal relations had long reasserted themselves within the bureaucratic structure that Qin had originally designed to make officials mere cogs in a machine, dependent on the emperor alone. In this talk, which grows out of my current research on shrines to living officials, I will focus not on the corruption and factionalism so salient in scholarship but on the rhetoric describing and idealizing the relation of local subjects to the magistrates and prefects set above them. The parental metaphor for this relationship, apparently a straightforward requirement to nourish and to obey, takes some surprising twists and turns as the writers of commemorative steles for pre-mortem shrines expand on it.

Sarah Schneewind is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego. She has studied the relations of state and society through an institutional case study, in Community Schools and the State in Ming China, and through an omenological micro-history, A Tale of Two Melons: Emperor and Subject in Ming China, a book also designed to introduce undergraduates and general readers to some aspects of historiography, Ming life, and melonology (guaxue). An edited volume, Long Live the Emperor! Uses of the Ming Founder Across Six Centuries of East Asian History, carried forward her attack on Ming autocracy. Oriens Extremus generously published her long study and interpretation of a short biography: “Reduce, Re-use, Recycle: Imperial Autocracy and Scholar-Official Autonomy in the Background to the Ming History Biography of Early Ming Scholar-Official Fang Keqin (1326-1376).” She is currently, and gratefully, on an NEH grant researching local shrines to living officials, with an opening bid, “Beyond Flattery,” coming out in the Journal of Asian Studies. She has an amateur interest in East-West connections and has proposed, in the Journal of American-East Asian Relations, that the Classic of Documents may have shaped the Declaration of Independence.

Posted by zzhu at 04:45 PM

February 18, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Victor Nee


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Victor Nee
Frank and Rosa Rhodes Professor
Department of Sociology
Cornell University

Capitalism from Below: Where do Economic Institutions Come From?

February 26, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This presentation discusses the model and findings from a seven year study of the private enterprise economy and emergence of economic institutions of capitalism in the Yangzi Delta region of China. This on-going study is based on a survey using a random sample of 700 entrepreneurs and private manufacturing firms conducted in 2006 and 2009-- a third wave is now in progress, 130 face-to-face interviews and field experiments. Core questions addressed in my seminar are: Why is institutional emergence an endogenous process involving like-minded economic actors? Why do norms and networks matter in the rise of capitalism? What is the role of the state? A description of the study is available on the study's website, which offers a list of survey cities, timeframe, research instruments, sampling and descriptive data.

Victor Nee is Frank and Rosa Rhodes Professor in the Department of Sociology, Cornell University. His current interests are focused on developing theories of the middle-range and their extension to empirical research. He is working on an on-going study of on entrepreneurs and private manufacturing firms in the Yangzi delta region of China. In Capitalism from Below: Markets and Institutional Change ( Harvard University Press, 2012), he and Sonja Opper detail the theory and evidence in explaining the emergence of economic institutions of capitalism.

Posted by zzhu at 02:27 PM

February 13, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Jersey Liang


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Jersey Liang
Professor of Health Management and Policy
U-M School of Public Health

Physical Performance and Socioeconomic Status among Older Chinese: A Multilevel Analysis

February 19, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This presentation focuses on physical performance (i.e., grip strength, normal walking speed, and rapid walk speed) as a function of socioeconomic status (SES) at the individual, household, and community levels among older Chinese. China has experienced rapid population aging during the last two decades. In 2006, the proportion of Chinese aged 60 and over had reached 10 percent, which is projected to reach 30 percent in 2030. Although China’s economy has grown approximately 9 percent annually since 1978, there is a marked increase in income disparity, with urban incomes more than three times of those in rural areas. The health consequences of the substantial income disparities among older Chinese have not been adequately studied.

Jersey Liang is Professor of Health Management and Policy at the School of Public Health and Research Professor at the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Michigan. His research has centered on comparative studies of aging and health across U.S., Japan, China, and Taiwan. Currently, he is exploring how psychosocial factors in conjunction with biomarkers affect health outcomes at the individual and community levels and how these processes vary across cultures.

Posted by zzhu at 01:56 PM

January 30, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Erik Mueggler


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Erik Mueggler
Professor of Anthropology
University of Michigan

'Cats give Funerals to Rats’: Making the Dead Modern through Lament

February 12, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk compares funeral laments in an Yi community in Yunnan from two periods: the early 1990s, after ritual revitalization had gotten thoroughly underway, and 2011, after this community had come into more intimate contact with the modernity-obsessed cultures of urban and semi-urban China. Laments fashion grief in a public setting by conceptualizing the dead and their relations with the living in vivid poetic language. Laments from the early 1990s described these relations as a circuit of suffering, in which children returned a debt of suffering they owed their parents after the latter's deaths. By 2011, innovative lamenters had reoriented their understanding of suffering to be personal, internal, and intimate. The dead became more “modern,” allowing the living, defined largely by their relations with the dead, to participate in “modernized” forms of authentic, sincere emotional expression.

Erik Mueggler is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. His books include: The Age of Wild Ghosts: Memory, Violence, Place in Southwest China (University of California Press, 2001) and The Paper Road: Archive and Experience in the Botanical Exporation of West China and Tibet (University of California Press, 2011).

Posted by zzhu at 02:39 PM

January 24, 2013

Winter 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Jing CAI


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Jing CAI
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics
University of Michigan

Insurance Take-up in Rural China: Learning from Hypothetical Experience

January 29, 2013
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This paper uses a novel experimental design to test for the role of experience and information in insurance take-up in rural China, where weather insurance was a new and highly subsidized product. We randomly select a group of poor households to play insurance games and find that it improves the actual insurance take-up by 48%. In order to determine the mechanism behind this effect, we test whether it is due to: (1) changes in risk attitudes, (2) changes in the perceived probability of future disasters, (3) learning the objective benefits of insurance, or (4) hypothetical experience of disaster. We show that the effect cannot be explained by mechanisms (1) to (3), and that the experience acquired in playing the insurance game matters. We develop a simple model in which agents give less weight to disasters and benefits which they experienced infrequently. Our estimation also suggests that compared with experience with real disasters in the previous year, experience gained in the insurance game played recently has a stronger effect on the actual insurance take-up, implying that learning from experience displays a strong recency effect.

Jing Cai is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Michigan. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2012. Her current research focuses on the role of social networks in information diffusion, adoption and impacts of new financial products in developing countries, impacts of tax incentives on firm behavior, and the effect of political connections on firm performance.

Posted by zzhu at 11:25 PM

November 29, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Filippo Marsili


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Filippo Marsili
Assistant Professor of History
Saint Louis University

Place and Ritual in Early Imperial China: A Comparative Perspective

December 4, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In light of recent studies on the centrality of religion in defining the conceptual boundaries of the Roman empire, this talk will closely analyse different sets of rituals that were debated during Han Wudi’s reign (141-87 BCE) and that illustrate competing conceptions about the relationship between center and periphery, human and extra-human realms.

Wudi’s reign is conventionally associated with the political and economic stabilization of the Han dynasty and with new grandiose programs of imperial propaganda. While “Confucian” scholars, roughly a century after the Legalist rule of the Qin (221-206 BCE), returned to occupy relevant positions at court, Wudi surrounded himself with alchemists (*fangshi*) from Qi and Yan, as he seemed to become increasingly obsessed with the pursuit of immortality. According to the *Shiji* these *fangshi*, whose teachings were at odds with the classical tradition, eventually overcame the sway of the “Confucians” at court and exerted a profound influence on the emperor’s religious programs. This presentation will argue that Wudi’s apparently incoherent ceremonial reforms represented an unsuccessful attempt at ritually legitimizing political and economic centralization against devolution and its influential advocates. In doing so, Professor Marsili will focus on rituals that the historical sources respectively associate with traditional values (the Shou ci tu) and heterodoxy or exoticism (Shenjun, Taiyi and Houtu), analyses pieces of archeological evidence that have been connected with these ceremonies, and finally compares the propagandistic use of religion under Wudi and the emperors of the Julio-Claudian dynasty (27 BCE – 68 CE) in Rome.

Filippo Marsili is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at St. Louis University. His primary focus is early China, and he is particularly interested in the ways imperial authority was represented and justified in the historiography, literature, and material culture of the Western Han Dynasty (3rd-1st century BCE). His current research concentrates on discourses about the legitimation of power and on the relationship between human agency and metaphysical forces. Through a cross-cultural analysis that involves the ancient Mediterranean world and Greco-Roman historiography, I historicize different approaches to divinity, monotheism, public and private ritual behaviors, and institutionalized religion. His final goal is the establishment, between East and West, of a shared vocabulary for the "sacred," and of an open dialogue that entails different understandings and practices concerning the perceived moral bases of societies and individual rights. He teaches courses on ancient Asian civilizations as well as on comparative political, cultural, and religious history

Posted by zzhu at 09:43 PM

November 13, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Thomas Rawski


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Thomas G. Rawski
Professor of Economics and History
University of Pittsburgh

Why Didn’t China’s Boom Begin in the 1870s Rather Than in the 1970s?

November 27, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Historians ranging from Albert Feuerwerker to Kenneth Pomeranz have labored to explain China’s limited economic success. Recent developments require a shift of perspective. New research highlights the contribution of beneficial human capital legacies to the genesis and progression of China’s ongoing economic boom. While the spread of education after 1949 is part of the story, vast resources of entrepreneurship and organizational capabilities revealed by the boom reflect deep historical roots. But if Qing China was well stocked with economically-relevant human capital, what accounts for limited economic progress under China’s late 19th-century regime of free trade, domestic market economy, substantial influx of technology, and modest reform efforts?

Thomas G. Rawski is Professor of Economics and History at the University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on the development and modern history of China’s economy, including studies of China’s reform mechanism and achievements, as well as analyses focused on productivity, investment, industry, trade, labor markets, environment, and economic measurement. His publications include books on Economic Growth and Employment in China; Chinese History in Economic Perspective; Economic Growth in Prewar China; China’s Transition to Industrialization; and Economics and the Historian. He is co-editor of recent volumes on China’s Rise and the Balance of Influence in Asia (2007) and China’s Great Economic Transformation (2008).

Posted by zzhu at 04:42 PM

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Benjamin Levey


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Benjamin Levey
Assistant Professor of History
University of Michigan-Dearborn

In the Land of the People Without Sutras: Jungar Refugees and Qing-Kazakh Relations, 1758-1775

November 20, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Narratives of violence have dominated the historiography on the Qing conquest of Jungaria. Nearly every history of the Qing conquest highlights the Qing’s violent massacres against the Jungars, with several works even asserting these massacres were tantamount to “ethnic genocide.” While there is no doubt that Qing armies unleashed terrible violence upon the Jungar people, a singular focus on these massacres has obscured the important historical role that Jungar refugees played in the decades following the disintegration of the Jungar confederation.

Based on a large corpus of previously unstudied Manchu language documents, this presentation discusses the fate of Jungar refugees in the fifteen years following the disintegration of the Jungar confederation. The Jungars no longer had a state of their own, but were ruled over by their two former enemies: the Kazakhs in the west and the Qing in the east. In examining the Jungars’ experience as refugees, Professor Levey will discuss the following topics: kinship networks that connected Jungar refugee populations living under both Qing and Kazakh control; the important role that bilingual refugees played in mediating Qing-Kazakh relations; the continued importance of Oirat as the lingua franca of the Qing-Kazakh borderlands; and disputes between the Kazakhs and the Qing over the issue of runaway Jungar slaves.

Ben Levey is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. Professor Levey’s research interests focus on Qing and Inner Asian history, Manjuristics, and borderlands in comparative perspective. He completed his MA training at Indiana University and Ph.D. at Harvard University.

Posted by zzhu at 04:36 PM

November 08, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - WANG Zheng


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WANG Zheng
Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and History
Associate Research Scientist, Institute for Research on Women and Gender at the University of Michigan
Associate Director, CCS

When Talented Women Became Socialist State Power Holders: Chen Bo’er and the Paradigm of Socialist Film in the PRC

November 13, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

How did Chinese women from elite families relocate and reposition themselves when the transition from empire to nation fundamentally hinged on restructuring an inner/outer gender space? The massive boarder-crossing from the inner to the outer practiced by elite women since the turn of the 20th century has been studied by scholars in various fields. This talk focuses on the implications of repositioning of new elite women on socialist state building by analyzing the life of Chen Bo’er (1907-1951), a movie star of the 1930s who became a founder of the PRC film industry.

WANG Zheng is associate professor of Women’s Studies and History, associate research scientist of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at University of Michigan, and currently, the associate director of the CCS. A long-term academic activist promoting gender studies in China, she is the director of the U-M-China Gender Studies Project, and founder and co-director of the U-M-Fudan Joint Institute for Gender Studies at Fudan University, Shanghai. Her English publications concern changing gender discourses and relations in China's socioeconomic, political and cultural transformations of the past century, and feminism in China, both in terms of its historical development and its contemporary activism in the context of globalization. She is the author of Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories (UC Press, 1999). She has edited volumes (both in English and Chinese) on a variety of topics: the construction of feminist subjectivity in socialist China, the politics and effects of translating feminisms in China throughout the twentieth century, and significance of introducing “gender” into the study of Chinese history as well as into the discursive contentions in contemporary China. The presentation is part of her on-going book project Melodies of Feminism: A Gender History of the PRC.

Posted by zzhu at 11:19 AM

October 30, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Nicola Di Cosmo


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Nicola Di Cosmo
Henry Luce Foundation Professor of East Asian History
School of Historical Studies, the Institute for Advanced Study

Connectivity, Integration and “Globalization” in Chinese History

November 6, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Throughout its history, with the ebb and flow of dynastic power, unity and disaggregation, expansion and invasion, China has been traversed by currents of change of varying magnitudes that were connected with other regions, both close and remote. This talk will examine various ways in which China has engaged the wider world (and vice versa) in its ancient and early modern past.

Nicola Di Cosmo is the Henry Luce Foundation Professor of East Asian History in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study. His main areas of research are the relations between China and Central Asia from ancient times to the modern period, the history of foreign dynasties in China, and, more generally, frontier relations seen from archaeological, anthropological, and historical perspectives. He taught at Harvard University and at the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) before joining the Faculty of the School of Historical Studies in 2003. He has written on Inner Asian history, Chinese history, and military history and he is the author of several books, including Ancient China and Its Enemies: The Rise of Nomadic Power in East Asian History (2002), A Documentary History of Manchu-Mongol Relations (1616-1626) (2003), and Diary of a Manchu Soldier in Seventeenth-Century China (2006). Professor Di Cosmo has also several edited or co-edited books that include Warfare in Inner Asian History, 500-1800 (2002), Political Frontiers, Ethnic Boundaries and Human Geographies in Chinese History (2001) and Military Culture in Imperial China (2009, A Choice Outstanding Academic Title). He is the Editor of the Central Asiatic Journal.

Posted by zzhu at 03:47 PM

October 25, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Fabio Lanza


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Fabio Lanza
Associate Professor of Modern Chinese History
Departments of History and East Asian Studies, University of Arizona

Rethinking “China” in the Global Sixties: Concerned Americans and French Maoists

October 30, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

It was in the global context of the nineteen-sixties—and possibly for the first time in the century—that China became an inspiration for radical youths, workers and scholars all over the world. But what did “China” mean in places so distant and different as Berkeley and Paris? This presentation focuses on the history of the Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars, an association of young students of Asia in the US, radically critical of US foreign policies but also of the structure of their own field of study. Through this analysis, and through a brief comparison with the phenomenon of French Maoism, Professor Lanza will show how this “China,” far from being the location of adolescent revolutionary dream, could be an essential element in reframing political and intellectual positions in the US and France. But he also suggests that, by examining how the Maoist experiments of the Cultural Revolution were reinterpreted in the West, we can try to clarify the meanings of a period of Chinese history that remains quite obscure. This talk is thus an invitation to rethink the global sixties through China, but also to analyze Maoism in the light of its global appropriation.

Fabio Lanza is associate professor of modern Chinese history in the Departments of History and East Asian Studies of the University of Arizona. His main research interests are political movements and urban history of twentieth-century China. His first book, Behind the Gate: Inventing Students in Beijing (Columbia University Press, 2010) explores the making of the category “students” and the process of politicization of Chinese youth during the May Fourth movement of 1919. He is currently working on a manuscript on Maoism, Asian Studies and intellectual activism in the U.S. and France.

Posted by zzhu at 08:56 PM

October 18, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - James Benn


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James Benn
Associate Professor of Buddhism and East Asian Religions and Chair
Department of Religious Studies, McMaster University

Tea and Other Decoctions for “Nourishing Life” in Medieval China

October 23, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Professor Benn will examine one significant way in which tea, a relatively new beverage in Tang-dynasty China, was first consumed and understood: alongside other decoctions intended to promote health and wellness. He will look at a range of materials including poetry, material medica, monastic regulations and polemical treatises in order to better appreciate medieval Chinese concepts of tea, its benefits, and it potential hazards.

James A. Benn (PhD, UCLA 2001) is Associate Professor of Buddhism and East Asian Religions and Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at McMaster University. He studies Buddhism and Taoism in medieval China. To date, he has focused on three major areas of research: bodily practice in Chinese Religions; the ways in which people create and transmit new religious practices and doctrines; and the religious dimensions of commodity culture. He has published on self-immolation, spontaneous human combustion, Buddhist apocryphal scriptures, and tea and alcohol in medieval China. He is the author of Burning for the Buddha: Self-immolation in Chinese Buddhism (University of Hawai'i Press, 2007) and is currently completing a second book, Tea in China: A Religious and Cultural History.

Posted by zzhu at 04:54 PM

October 03, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Lan Deng


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Lan Deng
Associate Professor, Urban and Regional Planning Program
U-M Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

The Emerging Housing Policy Framework in China

October 9, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk will discuss the emerging housing policy framework in China, which includes three major affordable housing programs and a heavily regulated housing finance sector. The three programs are the Economical and Comfortable Housing (ECH) program, the Housing Provident Fund (HPF) program, and the Cheap Rental Housing (CRH) program. For each program, I will describe how it works and whether it has been effective in achieving its policy objectives. I will also examine the characteristics of China’s newly developed mortgage market and present some examples on how the Chinese government has regulated this sector.

Lan Deng is an associate professor in the Urban and Regional Planning program and the interim director for the Real Estate Development Certificate program at the University of Michigan. Her primary research and teaching interests are in the areas of housing, real estate and local public finance. She is particularly interested in evaluating the effectiveness of governments’ efforts to deliver decent housing and quality neighborhoods to their residents and has conducted such evaluation in both China and the United States.

Posted by zzhu at 05:07 PM

September 27, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Andrew Wedeman


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Andrew Wedeman
Professor of Political Science
Georgia State University

Double Paradox: Rapid Growth and Rising Corruption in China

October 2, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The political economy of post-Mao China confronts us with a combination of rapid growth and rising corruption that appear to contradict the conventional wisdom that corruption reduces or retards economic development. In this talk, Professor Wedeman argues that this combination has been possible because rising corruption is a dynamic response to economic reforms that have created vast amounts of new value and transferred much of that value from the state to the economy. As such, reform has created the windfall profits that are at the core of high level corruption in contemporary China.

Professor Wedeman is currently a Professor of Political Science at Georgia State University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1994 and was a member of the Political Science Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln from 1994 to 2012. He is the author of two books on the political economy of post-Mao China: From Mao to Market: Rent Seeking, Local Protectionism, and Marketization in China (Cambridge 2003) and Double Paradox: Rapid Growth and Rising Corruption in China(Cornell 2012), as well as articles on corruption, central-local relations, and the development of market forces in China. His current research focuses the relationship between corruption, other forms of abuse of official authority, and mass unrest.

Posted by zzhu at 10:24 PM

September 19, 2012

Fall 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Roderick Campbell


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Roderick Campbell
Assistant Professor of East Asian Archaeology and History
Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University

On Forgetting: Violence and Memory in Early China

September 25, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

An often noted but less frequently studied aspect of memory is elision. What is not or cannot be remembered is as crucial a part of social memory as commemoration. This talk concerns a key Early Chinese practice of kingship: human sacrifice - and its forgetting.
Since graduating from Harvard in 2007 with a dual degree in Anthropology (Archaeology) and East Asian Languages and Civilizations (Chinese History) Professor Campbell's research has been focused on theorizing ancient social-political organization, social violence and history. His geographical and temporal focus has been late 2nd millennium BC north China, although an interest in broader comparison and long-term change is beginning to draw him beyond Shang China.

The recent, stunning pace of archaeological work in China has created both a huge backlog of un-or under-analyzed materials and an ever-growing mass of Chinese language publications rapidly outdating Western academic knowledge of the field. This situation creates great opportunities for new analyses and a dire need for new English-language syntheses of the early history of one of the world's great civilizations. With training as an archaeologist, historian and epigrapher, his work attempts to unite disparate sources of evidence with contemporary social theory.

Professor Campbell’s current fieldwork project, a collaboration with archaeologists from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, is a zooarchaeological production analysis on what may be the world’s largest collection of worked bone at Anyang, the last capital of the Shang dynasty. Recent publications have included an article on early complex polities for Current Anthropology and a report on the Origin of Chinese Civilization Project (with Yuan Jing) for Antiquity. He has recently finished an edited volume manuscript on Violence and Civilization for the Joukowsky Institute publication series and is finishing up another manuscript on the archaeology of the Chinese Bronze Age for the Cotsen Institute. He has received numerous fellowships, awards and grants for his work including ones from the Luce Archaeology Initiative, the Chiang Ching-kuo foundation, and the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

Posted by zzhu at 09:42 PM

March 29, 2012

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Cheng Huang


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Cheng Huang
Assistant Research Professor, Hubert Department of Global Health, Emory University

Natural Experiments in Health Research: What We could Learn from the Chinese 1959-61 Famine and Recent Mega Events in China?

April 10, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Natural experiment is an underused tool in health research. Drawing upon examples of his own research, Dr. Huang presents how to use famine as a natural experiment to study malnutrition in critical periods of life and adult health and human development, as well as how to use mega-events such as the Beijing Olympic Games 2008, during which period air quality was rapidly improved due to radical means such as traffic restriction, to study environment and population health.

Dr. Cheng Huang is a demographer and population economist with a PhD in demography from the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include migration policy and health inequalities in the US, global population ageing, health consequences of hunger/malnutrition, environment and health, and methodology. His research has been published in journals including Demography, Population Studies, Social Science & Medicine, and Journal of Nutrition. Dr. Huang recently obtained several NIH grants for his research on climate change and population health in the US, as well as long-term health consequences of the Chinese 1959-61 famine. Dr. Huang serves as faculty in the Hubert Department of Global Health at Emory University where he teaches Population Dynamics and Global Tobacco Control.

Posted by zzhu at 02:29 PM

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Ellen Laing


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Ellen Laing
Center Associate, U-M Center for Chinese Studies
Professor Emerita of the History of Art, University of Oregon

"Living Wealth Gods" in the Chinese Popular Print (年画) Tradition

April 3, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Depictions of a host of different Wealth Gods were standard items in the popular print (nianhua) inventory of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Substantial literature exists on these Wealth God representations. One special wealth theme, however, has largely been overlooked-the “Living Wealth God” (huo caishen). In the popular print imagery, the “Living Wealth God” has three dimensions. The first is the depiction of a generic, anonymous “Living Wealth God;” the second is the connection between the anonymous “Living Wealth God” and the practice of “counting the nines” (“nine-nines disperse the cold” jiujiu xiaohan); the third is the representation of identifiable fabulously wealthy people, some of whom earned the appellation “Living Wealth God.” This lecture explores the context and significance of these three categories of “Living Wealth God.”

Ellen Johnston Laing, an Associate at the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan, received her Ph.D. in Far Eastern Art History at the University of Michigan in 1967. Specializing in Chinese painting and material culture, she has published 60 articles in scholarly journals, as well as presenting numerous papers for academic and general audiences in the United States and abroad. She has published nine books, the most recent of which is Divine Rule and Earthly Bliss: Popular Chinese Prints: The Collection of Gerd and Lottie Wallenstein (Berlin: Museum für Asiatische Kunst, 2010).

Posted by zzhu at 02:21 PM

March 15, 2012

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Sophie Volpp


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Sophie Volpp
Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature,
University of California Berkeley

The Translucence of the Medium: Interiors and Interiority in the Eighteenth-century Novel Story of the Stone (红楼梦)

March 27, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In this talk, Professor Volpp examines the novel Honglou meng's representation of new technologies of interior illumination and decoration such as plate glass windows, full-length mirrors, and perspectival painting. She asks how the capacity of such new technologies to encourage play upon perception within domestic interiors might have inspired innovative means of representing interiority. The novel's exploration of new technologies of illumination, reflection and perspective allow the reader to reconsider the materiality of a medium of representation. Ultimately, these technologies serve the novel's concern with encouraging in the reader an elevated quality of perception that leads to a new apprehension of the fictional.

Sophie Volpp is Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature at the University of California Berkeley. Her book Worldly Stage: Theatricality in Seventeenth-century China analyzed the influence of seventeenth-century theatrical culture on conceptions of spectatorship and performance, Her current book project, Substantive Fictions: Literary Texts and Material Culture in Late-imperial China, examines the representation of objects in seventeenth and eighteenth-century Chinese fiction in order to discuss the relation between seventeenth-century Chinese conceptions of the material and the fictional.

Posted by zzhu at 05:32 PM

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Jeff Snyder-Reinke


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Jeff Snyder-Reinke (CCS MA '01, PhD '06),
Assistant Professor of History and Asian Studies, College of Idaho

Grave Transgressions: Adjudicating the Corpse in Late Imperial China

March 20, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk will examine the crime of grave violation (fazhong) during the Qing dynasty. It will explore the anxieties surrounding death and the protection of the deceased in Qing law and society, and how transgressing the grave’s physical and metaphysical boundaries could be a source of power in the late imperial period.

Jeff Snyder-Reinke earned his PhD from the University of Michigan in 2006. He is currently assistant professor of history and Asian studies at The College of Idaho. His most recent book is Dry Spells: State Rainmaking and Local Governance in Late Imperial China, which was published by the Harvard University Asia Center in 2009. His current book project is entitled “Tomb Raiders: The Culture and Politics of Grave Violation in Late Imperial China.” The project examines the crime of grave violation (fazhong) in an effort to shed light on topics such as the cult of ancestors, late imperial conceptions of the body, the material culture of death, and Qing legal practice.

Posted by zzhu at 05:15 PM

February 15, 2012

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Bruce Dickson


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Bruce Dickson (BA '80, MA '82, PhD '94), Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Updating the China Model: New Challenges for New Leaders

March 13, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

With new leaders about to come to power in China, the ruling Communist Party is also making significant changes to its development model, such as encouraging more domestic consumption instead of relying on exports, and building "national champions" instead of relying on the private sector. What challenges does the party face in this transition? What will be the political implications of these changes?

Bruce J. Dickson is professor of political science and international affairs at the George Washington University. His research and teaching focus on comparative politics, the political dynamics of authoritarian regimes, and the prospects for political change in China. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the U.S. Institute of Peace. He is the author of Wealth into Power: The Communist Party’s Embrace of China’s Private Sector (2008), and co-author of Allies of the State: China’s Private Entrepreneurs and Democratic Change (2010).

Posted by zzhu at 11:50 PM

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Abé Mark Nornes


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Abé Mark Nornes, U-M Professor of Asian Cinema; Chair, Screen Arts and Cultures

When the "Underground" Goes Underground: Independent Documentary and the Crackdown

March 6, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In the last decade the PRC government opened up a space for non-official nonfiction filmmakers, who swiftly established one of the most vigorous and fascinating documentary cultures in the world. Filmmakers displayed admirably stubborn tactics to circumnavigate the government's occasional interference. It was essentially an above-ground underground film scene. However, a recent crackdown inaugurated by Ai Weiwei's April 2011 arrest proved qualitatively different, calling for a strategy of retreat and caution. A. M. Nornes describes the effects of the recent pressure, which has forced the "underground" to actually go underground.

Abé Mark Nornes is Professor of Asian Cinema at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Cinema Babel (Minnesota UP), a theoretical and historical look at the role of translation in film history. He also wrote Forest of Pressure: Ogawa Shinsuke and Postwar Japanese Documentary and Japanese Documentary Film: From the Meiji Era to Hiroshima (both Minnesota UP). He co-edited Japan-American Film Wars (Routledge), In Praise of Film Studies (Kinema Club), and many film festival retrospective catalogs. He is on the editorial boards of International Studies in Documentary and Mechadamia and has been co-owner of the internet newsgroup KineJapan since its inception. He worked for many years as a coordinator of the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival.

Posted by zzhu at 11:36 PM

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Robert Campany


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Robert Campany, Professor of Asian Studies and Religious Studies, Vanderbilt University

Mapping the Dreamscape of Early Medieval China

February 21, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk is based upon a paper which is a preliminary attempt to map the variety of notions in early medieval China concerning such questions as these: In what does the activity of dreaming consist? Are dreams meaningful, and if so, how and why do they mean what they mean? How can they be interpreted? Are there different classes of dreamers who dream different sorts of dreams? There were no univocal answers to these questions. Rather, ideas about dreaming and reams formed a repertoire selectively used by various actors for various ends.

Robert Ford Campany is Professor of Asian Studies and Religious Studies at Vanderbilt University. He previously taught at Indiana University and the University of Southern California. He is the author most recently of Making Transcendents: Ascetics and Social Memory in Early Medieval China (2009) and Signs from the Unseen Realm: Buddhist Miracle Tales from Early Medieval China (forthcoming in2012).

Posted by zzhu at 11:24 PM

January 25, 2012

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Timothy Billings


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Timothy Billings, Professor of English and American Literatures, Middlebury College

Translating Matteo Ricci’s Jiaoyou lun

February 14, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In 1595 Matteo Ricci composed the first work to be written in Chinese by a European, a treatise on friendship in the classical style which instantly attracted the attention of discerning Chinese literati. This talk discusses the nature of the text and various challenges and insights that arose in the process of preparing its first English edition.

Timothy Billings is a specialist in early modern literary and cultural exchange with China. He is the translator of Matteo Ricci's On Friendship: One Hundred Maxims for a Chinese Prince (Columbia UP, 2009) and the co-translator of Victor Segalen's collection of French and Chinese poetry, Stèles (Wesleyan UP, 2007), which was awarded the Modern Language Association’s Aldo and Jean Scaglione Prize for Best Translation of a Literary Work. He is Professor of English at Middlebury College where he teaches early modern English literature, world literature, and Chinese poetry.

Posted by zzhu at 01:09 PM

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Sarah Swider


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Sarah Swider, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Wayne State University

Building China: Migrant Workers in China’s Construction Industry

February 7, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk presents three prevalent employment arrangements among migrant workers in the informal sector of China’s construction industry. It shows how each employment arrangement is characterized by specific mechanisms that channel migrants into a segmented informal labor market and shapes their lives on and off the jobsite.

Sarah Swider is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Wayne State University. She received her PhD in Sociology from University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Masters of Industrial Labor Relations from Cornell University. Most of her research is focused on understanding labor in a global perspective. She has looked at transnational labor cooperation, seeking to understand different forms of cooperation, conditions under which cooperation was likely, and factors that influence the outcome. Her recent research looks at the migrant labor workforce which has developed as part of China’s integration into the global economy. Specifically, she completed a study based on more than a year of extensive ethnographic field research in China focused on migrant construction workers in the informal labor market. On the macro-level, it shows how these migrants, who have limited citizenship, are spatially, socially, and economically integrated into China’s global cities. On the micro level, the study identifies mechanisms that channel migrants into a segmented informal labor market and shapes the labor process. This research is completed and is currently being worked into a book manuscript and several articles.

Posted by zzhu at 01:07 PM

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Esther Klein


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Esther Klein, Coordinator, Asian Studies Program; Lecturer of Chinese, University of Illinois at Chicago

Sima Qian's Confucius and the Western Han Lunyu

January 31, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The Lunyu (Confucian Analects) has long been considered the most important record of Confucius' thought, yet there is almost no trace of this text before the Western Han. While Confucius was ubiquitous as an authority figure before that time, careful examination shows that he was not primarily a "Lunyu Confucius." The Shiji was one of the first texts to make widespread use of Lunyu material, and my paper analyzes the function and status of this material in contrast to other non-Lunyu understandings of Confucius also present in the text.

Esther Klein has a Ph.D. in East Asian Studies from Princeton University, specializing in early Chinese historical narrative. Her dissertation analyzed constructions of Sima Qian as author the Shiji, and in a larger sense explored what it meant to write history within the Chinese tradition from the Han to the Song dynasties. She is currently employed at the University of Illinois at Chicago, running the Asian Studies program and teaching courses in Chinese history and in Asian Studies more broadly. Her next project focuses on how Han dynasty thinkers shaped the intellectual legacy of the Warring States.

Posted by zzhu at 12:58 PM

January 19, 2012

Winter 2012 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Bright Sheng


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Bright Sheng, Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Never Far Away: Professor Sheng presents a self-survey on what is considered "Chinese-ness" in his compositions

January 24, 2012
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The MacArthur Fellow Bright Sheng was born on December 6th, 1955, in Shanghai, China, and moved to New York in 1982. He is currently the Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor at University of Michigan, and the Distinguished Artist-in-Residence at Aaron Copland School of Music of Queens College, CUNY. He has collaborated with distinguished musicians such as Leonard Bernstein, Kurt Masur, Christoph Eschenbach, Charles Dutoit, Leonard Slatkin, Gerard Schwarz, David Robertson, David Zinman, Neeme Järvi, Robert Spano, Hugh Wolff, Yo Yo Ma, Peter Serkin, Emanuel Ax, Chao-Liang Lin, Yefim Bronfman, Evelyn Glennie, among others. He has been widely commissioned and performed by virtually all important musical institutions in North America, Europe and Asia, including the White House, the 2008 Beijing International Olympic Games, New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Chicago Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Orchestra de Paris, BBC Symphony, Hamburg Radio Symphony, Danish National Symphony, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Santa Fe Opera, New York City Opera, New York City Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet.

As a conductor and pianist, he has performed with, in the U.S., the San Francisco Symphony, Detroit Symphony, Seattle Symphony, New York Chamber Symphony, Grand Rapids Symphony, St. Petersburg Philharmonic in Russia, Dortmund Philharmonic in Germany, China National Symphony, among others; and has appeared at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Kennedy Center. Since 2011, he has been the Founder and Artistic Director of The Intimacy of Creativity—The Bright Sheng Partnership: Composers Meet Performers in Hong Kong, an annual two-week workshop with a new approach to creativity. Exclusively published by G. Schirmer Inc. in New York City, he can also be heard on Naxos, Sony Classical, Talarc, Delos, Koch International, New World labels and Grammofon AB BIS.

Posted by zzhu at 10:53 PM

November 16, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Pär Cassel


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Pär Cassel, U-M Assistant Professor of History

From Filiality to Loyalty: Visions of the Emperor in Late Imperial China

December 6, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

When historians and social scientists have tried to account for the different personality cults that emerged in the twentieth century, they have often treated those movements as regressions into an “emperor worship,” which was supposedly intrinsic to the political culture of imperial China. However, the vast mass of commoners did not stand in any direct ritual relationship to the state or the emperor in late imperial China; the name, the countenance or personal qualities of the Ming and Qing Emperors were not known to the common people and they were not called upon to participate in official rituals to worship the sovereign. Yet the emperor was ever-present to his commoners in a variety of ways and he spoke directly to them in a number of political documents that were designed to exalt the image of the ruling house through promotion of Confucian virtues. This talk looks at one of those documents, the Sacred Edict of the Kangxi and Yongzheng emperors, and explores how it shaped the political culture of late imperial China.

Pär Cassel is assistant professor of history at the University of Michigan. He has just completed his book, entitled Grounds of Judgment: Extraterritoriality and Imperial Power in Nineteenth-Century China and Japan, which is due to be published by Oxford University Press (New York) in 2012. The book reopens the question of consular jurisdiction and extraterritoriality in China and Japan and combines the findings of “New Qing history” with the history of the treaty ports in both China and Japan.

Posted by zzhu at 03:27 PM

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Darrell William Davis


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Darrell William Davis, Honorary Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, Lingnan University, Hong Kong

Second Coming: The Legacy of Taiwan New Cinema

November 29, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

New Cinema's visibility sterns not just from directors but from its homeland convictions, approach, and techniques. Taiwan-as-homeland though, is a contested, mutating idea, depending on who mobilizes it and to what end. New cinema began by exploring the home and family of Bildungsroman and then opened toward sociopolitical, historical aspects of Taiwan. This talk accounts for the shifting meanings of home (xiangtu), with respect to nativism, geopolitical shifts and visual expressions.

Darrell W. Davis specializes in Japanese and Chinese-language film and media. Author of Picturing Japaneseness: Monumental Style, National Identity, Japanese Film (Columbia University Press, 1996), co-author of Taiwan Film Directors: a Treasure Island (Columbia University Press, 2005), East Asian Screen Industries (British Film Institute, 2008) and co-editor of Cinema Taiwan: Politics, Popularity and State of the Arts (Routledge, 2007), as well as having published over 30 articles and book chapters.

Posted by zzhu at 03:17 PM

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - James Robson


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James Robson, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Monks, Monasteries and Madness: The Relationship between Buddhist Monasteries and Mental Institutions in East Asia

This presentation is co-sponsored by the U-M Center for Japanese Studies.

November 22, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

There has been increasing attention paid to the relationship between Buddhism and medicine, but despite the advances in a number of subfields, there remains a paucity of studies on Buddhism and madness. What was the early Buddhist doctrinal discourse on madness? How has the category of madness evolved within the Buddhist tradition? While there are many records for monks who specialized in therapeutic practices aimed at dealing with those beset by demonic afflictions, possession, or madness, there was also a well-developed a tradition of highly cultivated "feigned madness" that marked the monk or artist with the distinction of not being bound by normative social behavior. In this talk, Professor Robson will discuss the history of some of the specific ways Buddhism addressed madness, but will narrow the focus of his comments to the intriguing history of one particular site in the northern part of Kyoto in Japan and the relationship between a Buddhist temple there and the many mental hospitals that grew up around it and are still active today.

Posted by zzhu at 03:11 PM

November 10, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Maram Epstein


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Maram Epstein, Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Oregon

Girls Doing for Themselves: Redefining Filial Piety as a Virtue for Women in Late Imperial China

November 15, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Even as chastity was the definitive virtue for women in late imperial China, a growing number of girls and women were claiming virtuous identities for themselves as daughters filial to their natal families. As suggested by female-authored tanci fiction and exemplary biographies, girls and women were drawn to filial piety as a virtue that allowed them expanded forms of agency and control not possible under the ritual codes of chastity. This talk is drawn from a book project that looks at the changing representations and practices of filial piety associated with men and women in Qing China. Sources include fiction, court case memorials, chronological biographies, and local gazetteers.

Maram Epstein is an associate professor of Chinese literature at the University of Oregon. Her research has been focused on reading Ming-Qing novels within their specific cultural and aesthetic contexts. Although her approach to late-imperial fiction is grounded in the intellectual and cultural context of the period and refers to traditional commentaries for immediate “reader response,” the questions she asks are largely informed by recent critical concerns, particularly in the area of gender theory. Professor Epstein’s first book, Competing Discourses, analyzes the shifting fictional representations of gender and sexual desire from within the context of the neo-Confucian discourse of self-cultivation and the late-Ming cult of qing (sentiment). She argues that a poetics of gender based on yinyang numerology is an essential structural element in many Ming-Qing novels.

Posted by zzhu at 10:39 PM

November 03, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Albert I. Hermalin and Deborah Lowry


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More on this conversation here.

Albert I. Hermalin, U-M Population Studies Center, ISR
Deborah Lowry, U-M Population Studies Center, ISR

The Age Prevalence of Smoking among Chinese Women: A Case of Arrested Diffusion?

November 8, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The smoking prevalence by age of women in China is distinct from most other countries in showing more frequent smoking among older women than younger. Using newly developed birth cohort histories of smoking, the authors demonstrate that although over one quarter of women born 1908-1912 smoked, levels of smoking declined across successive cohorts. This occurred despite high rates of smoking by men and the wide availability of cigarettes. The analysis shows how this pattern is counter to that predicted by the leading theoretical perspectives on the diffusion of smoking and suggests that it arose out of a special culture of gender relations.

Albert Hermalin is Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Research Professor Emeritus of the Population Studies Center at the University of Michigan. He joined the University in 1967. His earlier research focused on fertility and family planning in Taiwan and subsequently in other developing countries. For the last 20 years he has concentrated on the dynamics and consequences of population aging in Asia, leading to the edited monograph, “The Well-Being of the Elderly in Asia: a Four Country Comparative Study” (2002). More recent research has examined the health and mortality levels of the older population in Taiwan, and the patterns of tobacco use among women in East Asia.

Deborah Lowry was a NIH Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Michigan's Population Research Center from 2008-2011 and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Montevallo, Alabama. Her research focuses on aging and elderly well-being in the midst of China’s economic development and urbanization, as well as strategic individual and household responses to (and roles in) China’s social changes. Her most recent field work investigates at-home chronic illness management in Hangzhou.

Posted by zzhu at 09:29 PM

October 12, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - David Porter


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David Porter, U-M Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Johnson's Dictionary and the Kangxi Zidian: An Experiment in Comparative Lexicography

November 1, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The dictionary projects of Samuel Johnson in England and the Kangxi Emperor in China are both regarded, in their great ambition and the lexicographical innovations they introduced, as emblematic of the scholarly aspirations of their periods. This talk will explore some of the unexpected convergences between these two seemingly unrelated projects and consider their implications for situating China's eighteenth century in relation to world historical time.

David Porter is Professor of English and Comparative Literature. He is the author of Ideographia: The Chinese Cipher in Early Modern Europe and The Chinese Taste in Eighteenth-Century England.

Posted by zzhu at 08:50 PM

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Kenneth Swope


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Kenneth Swope (PhD, '01), Associate Professor of History, Ball State University

Manifesting Awe: Grand Strategy and Imperial Leadership in the Ming Dynasty

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

October 25, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Until recently, very little attention has been devoted to the subject of imperial leadership and the role of emperors as supreme military commanders in the Ming dynasty. This talk will discuss the important roles played by Ming monarchs in military strategy and consider whether or not the Ming had a Grand Strategy for defending the empire.

Kenneth M. Swope earned his B.A. at the College of Wooster (1992), M.A. at the Center for Chinese Studies (1995) and Ph.D. in the Department of History at Michigan (2001). He is the author of A Dragon's Head and a Serpent's Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592-1598 (2009) and numerous articles in Ming dynasty history. He is currently Associate Professor of History and Director of the History M.A. Program at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. His current book project is “The Military Collapse of China's Ming Dynasty, 1619-1644,” scheduled for publication in 2011.

Posted by zzhu at 08:37 PM

October 04, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Linda Rui Feng


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Linda Rui Feng, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian Studies, University of Toronto

Youth, or Something like It: Perceptions of Thresholds in Tang Narratives

October 11, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

How was coming-of-age understood, imagined, and ultimately represented for the literati elite in Tang China? What constituted the threshold experiences that separated men from boys, and what crises might they evoke? Focusing on narratives from the ninth century, this talk will explore the changing perception of personhood as it relates to these pivotal life intervals.

Linda Rui Feng is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto, where she works on research topics that span both cultural history and literature in Tang China. Her book manuscript is tentatively titled “Youthful Displacement: City, Travel and Narrative Formation in Tang Tales.”

Posted by zzhu at 05:05 PM

September 22, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Hu Ying


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Hu Ying Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Literatures, UC Irvine

Burying “Nie Zheng’s Bones:” The Making of Martyrs in 1911

October 4, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk examines two prominent cases of martyrdom, that of Qiu Jin (1875-1907), who was a member of Sun Yat-sen’s Revolutionary Alliance and was beheaded by the Qing for her involvement in an armed uprising, and that of Liangbi (1877-1912), Manchu loyalist, commander of the First Brigade of the Qing Palace Guard, whose assassination in January 1912 sealed the fate of the Empire. As canonization typically involves immediate associates, local elites and the state, the process, whether successful or not, gives us a privileged window for viewing different conceptions of virtue, community and different ways of history writing.

Hu Ying completed her doctorate in Comparative Literature at Princeton in 1992 and currently holds the position of Associate Professor of Chinese Literature at UC Irvine. The focus of her research is the literature and culture of late 19th to early 20th century China, a fascinating period that witnessed rapid changes in every aspect of the Chinese world. This period of great ideological and cultural fluidity bred a generation of independent thinkers. She is specifically interested in seeing how women at the time - revolutionaries, writers, artists - understood and intervened in such changes of political system, cultural values and gender norms. Publications include New Approaches to Chinese Women’s Lives: Beyond Exemplar Tales, Berkeley: University of California Press (forthcoming); co-edited with Joan Judge; and Tales of Translation: Composing the New Woman in China, 1898-1918, Stanford University Press, 2000.

Posted by zzhu at 07:46 PM

September 21, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Yuen Yuen Ang


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Yuen Yuen Ang, Assistant Professor of Political Science, U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

Dual Fiscal Incentives: Informal Public Compensation, Time Horizon, and Bureaucratic Behavior in Local China

September 27, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In this talk, Yuen Yuen Ang presents her research on China's unique structure of informal public compensation and its implications for the economic behavior of local state actors in China during the reform era. Based on over 200 interviews and an original dataset, she shows that there are simultaneous fiscal incentives at work at a micro level, one motivating local cadres to pursue growth for their localities but the other to extract petty rents for their offices.

Yuen Yuen Ang joined the Department of Political Science of the University of Michigan as an assistant professor in 2011. Previously, she was a faculty member at Columbia University SIPA (School of International and Public Affairs). Her research on China focuses on the political economy of development, bureaucratic politics, and local governance.

Posted by zzhu at 07:34 PM

September 10, 2011

Fall 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Jean Oi


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Jean Oi (PhD, '83), Director, Stanford China Program; William Haas Professor in Chinese Politics, Department of Political Science; and Senior Fellow, FSI, Stanford University

Why Redistrict in a One-Party State? Administrative Re-Organization and Boundary Changes in Rural China

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

September 20, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In the face of the many new challenges of rural governance in a rapidly evolving political economy, China has embarked on an ambitious reorganization of the countryside, resettling villagers and creating new rural communities—the rural shequ. With this new form of organization and governance the state is rethinking who should get what public goods and what is the best way to deliver those goods. Based on recent fieldwork, Oi will discuss the logic, as well as the consequences of these changes. Who gains and who loses?

Jean C. Oi is the William Haas Professor in Chinese Politics in the Department of Political Science and a senior fellow of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. A Ph.D. in political science from the University of Michigan, she joined the Stanford faculty in 1997. She directed Stanford’s Center for East Asian Studies from 1998 to 2005. In 2007 Oi became the founding director of the Stanford China Program at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and leads Stanford’s China Initiative.

She has published extensively on China’s rural politics and political economy. Currently, she is writing on the remaking of the state owned enterprises. She also continues her research on rural finance and local governance in China and has started a new project on the logic of administrative redistricting in the Chinese countryside.

Her recent publications include “Shifting Fiscal Control to Limit Cadre Power in China's Towns and Villages,” (forthcoming, China Quarterly), Going Private in China: The Politics of Corporate Restructuring and System Reform, ed., (APARC-Brookings, 2011); and Growing Pains: Tensions and Opportunity in China's Transformation (APARC-Brookings, 2010), co-edited with Scott Rozelle and Xueguang Zhou.

Posted by zzhu at 07:26 PM

March 30, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Robert Adams


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Robert Adams, Assistant Professor of Architecture, U-M Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

Incidents of Genetic Mutation, Spatial Anomaly and Accidental Architecture in Urban China

April 12, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

If the 20th century was mobilized through auto-centric economies invented by industrial urban machines such as Detroit, and the early 21st century accelerated through digital communication technologies manufactured in Shenzhen, then how have these mutually constructed, globally distributed apparatuses impacted architecture as a physical marker of cultural formation and ambition? This lecture will not be about the spectacular architectural iconography broadcast during the Beijing Olympic Games, but rather it will move in on the passive labor and background structures of urbanism that situate architecture as a deeply relational cultural construct in the context of China refracted in the world. The talk will draw out parallels between genomics and regulatory sequencing that similarly, as in the complex formation of genetic matter, urban formation is punctuated by spontaneous mutations and genetic deletions within the social body rendered in space. Organized like a graphic catalogue, this lecture will use a series of design research projects to explore the relational mechanics between disability theory, actor networks and how the diversity of material practices in China will continue to alter perceptions of the social-civic body and the institutional models of these bodies implied through architecture.

Robert Adams is Assistant Professor of Architecture at Taubman College, University of Michigan where he teaches courses in design and construction technology. With his colleagues Robert Mangurian and Mary-Ann Ray, Adams co-founded B.A.S.E. Beijing Architecture Studio Enterprise in 2005, a design studio located in the urban village of Cao Chang Di. His design work has been exhibited internationally including the 2009 Beijing Biennial, Shenzhen University, Tianjin University in China, and University of Michigan and University of California at Berkeley in the United States. Most recently his project, the Asclepius Machine, was recognized as a finalist in the international Seoul Design For All competition. Adams’ research couples work in disability theory with emerging work in pervasive computing, sensor technologies and architectural projects that reconsider the linkages between social bodies, public spheres and institutional machines. Adams is a Faculty Associate at the Center for Chinese Studies.

Posted by zzhu at 04:48 PM

March 24, 2011

CANCELED - Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - David Shambaugh


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David Shambaugh (PhD, '89), Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

CANCELED - Coping with a Conflicted China

Due to circumstances beyond our control, Professor Shambaugh’s talk today has been cancelled. We regret any inconvenience this may cause.

The next presentation in the CCS Noon Lecture Series will take place on Tuesday, April 12th.


Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

March 29, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

China's bilateral ties with the United States, regional relations in Asia, and global position reflect a conflicted worldview within China. In this talk, Professor Shambaugh will elucidate the different schools of thought in China's foreign policy discourse and will discuss the policy implications of dealing with a conflicted China.

David Shambaugh is Professor of Political Science & International Affairs and Director of the China Policy Program in the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. He is also a nonresident Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of many publications on China, is the former Editor of The China Quarterly, and received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Posted by zzhu at 03:16 PM

March 17, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - San Duanmu and Yiwen Zhou


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San Duanmu, Professor of Linguistics, Department of Linguistics, University of Michigan
Yiwen Zhou, Graduate Student in Linguistics, University of Michigan

The Decline of a Prestigious Tongue: Language Preferences in Modern Shanghai

March 22, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Barely a generation ago, Shanghai Chinese was a highly prestigious regional language and used by millions everywhere in the city. Today it is no longer the main language heard on the street and increasingly not even spoken at home by children of Shanghai parents. What caused such rapid decline? What languages are taking over its place? Are people concerned about the loss of their native tongue? Will similar linguistic casualties occur in other places of fast socio-economic changes, such as Hong Kong? We explore answers to such questions through a survey of 2,000 residents in Shanghai.

San Duanmu is Professor of Linguistics, University of Michigan. He received his Ph.D. in Linguistics from MIT in 1990 and has held teaching posts at Fudan University, Shanghai (1981-1986) and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1991-present). He is the author of The Phonology of Standard Chinese (2nd edition, Oxford 2007) and Syllable Structure: The Limits of Variation (Oxford 2008).

Yiwen Zhou is a second year graduate student in Linguistics at the University of Michigan. She is now working on sound change of Shanghai dialect and Chinese language policy. She is interested in the interaction of ideologies and linguistic variation.

Posted by zzhu at 10:22 AM

March 08, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Minyuan Zhao


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Minyuan Zhao, Assistant Professor of Strategy, U-M Ross School of Business

China’s Intellectual Property Environment: A Firm-Level Perspective

March 15, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Along many dimensions, China has made significant progress in strengthening the protection of intellectual property (IP) and expanding its research and development (R&D) base over the past two decades. Meanwhile, people’s understanding of IP has gone beyond a mechanical interpretation of patent law or copyright law. Instead, firms have begun to realize that IP protection is part of a complex business environment including various cultural, economic and strategic factors. This talk takes a firm-level perspective and addresses two related topics: the IP environment faced by various types of firms, and firms’ strategic responses to the perceived IP environment. Momentum for IP reform in China will depend on the trajectory of China’s structural reform in the next few years.

Minyuan Zhao is an Assistant Professor of Strategy at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan. Professor Zhao earned her Ph.D. from Stern School of Business, New York University in May 2004. Before joining Michigan, she was an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, where she taught Strategy and International Business Environment classes to MBA and EMBA students. Professor Zhao's research interests are in the interaction between firm strategies and external environments in a global context. Her papers on multinational R&D organization and intellectual property rights protection received first place in the INFORMS Dissertation Proposal Competition (2003), the BPS Best Paper Award at the Academy of Management (2004), and the Best Paper Award at the Strategic Management Society (2006). Her recent studies examine industrial policies in emerging economies, knowledge flows within technology clusters, and how internal linkages among firms’ geographically dispersed units allow them to alleviate uncertainties at the local level. She teaches the World Economy course, an MBA core, and the International Business Seminar, a Ph.D. elective.

Posted by zzhu at 02:52 PM

February 25, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Stefan Henning


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Stefan Henning (PhD, '05), Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Northwestern University

"History of the Soul": A Chinese Writer, Nietzsche, and Tiananmen 1989

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

March 8, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Zhang Chengzhi (born 1948) was in the 1980s one of China's most important short story writers and in the 1990s among the most prominent Chinese essayists. The talk presents a close reading of Zhang's History of the Soul, a genre-transcending text at once history of a Chinese Sufi group, religious parable, and autobiographic account of Zhang's turn to Islam. I try to show that History of the Soul, which was published in 1992, was Zhang's response to the Tiananmen Incident which itself is not mentioned in the text.

Stefan Henning graduated from the doctoral program in anthropology and history at the University of Michigan. He is now a visiting assistant professor in anthropology and sociology at Northwestern University, after three years as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Oxford. Henning studies the intersection of religious ethics and political action in twentieth century China, with a view on Nietzsche's analysis of religious morals in Europe. He has conducted fieldwork with Muslim activists in Beijing, Lanzhou, and Ningxia.

Posted by zzhu at 09:57 AM

February 17, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Andrew Walder


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Andrew Walder (PhD, '81), Denise O’Leary and Ken Thiry Professor, Department of Sociology, Stanford University

Re-thinking the Cultural Revolution: The Red Guards and Beyond

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

February 22, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The scholarly understanding of mass political conflict during the first two years of China's Cultural Revolution has undergone pronounced changes in recent years. Professor Walder will talk about how this understanding has changed, beginning with his recent book, Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement, and with his subsequent work on the power seizure and factionalism in Nanjing, and his new research project on the rapid spread of the movement throughout China's provinces, down to the level of rural counties.

Andrew Walder is the Denise O'Leary and Kent Thiry Professor in the Department of Sociology at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Michigan in 1981. A political sociologist, Walder has long specialized in the sources of conflict, stability, and change in communist regimes and their successor states. He joined the Stanford faculty the fall of 1997, and previously held faculty positions at Columbia, Harvard, and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His recent publications include Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement (2009); The Chinese Cultural Revolution as History, edited with Joseph Esherick and Paul Pickowicz (2006); "Ambiguity and Choice in Political Movements: The Origins of Beijing Red Guard Factionalism," in the American Journal of Sociology (2006); and "Nanjing's Failed January Revolution of 1967: The Inner Politics of a Failed Power Seizure;" China Quarterly 203 (2010).

Posted by zzhu at 12:17 PM

February 09, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Enno Giele


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Enno Giele, Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona

Ways to Assess Ancient Literacy

February 15, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The ability to read and write is so much taken for granted in our modern societies that it requires considerable effort to even imagine how societies work where this element is lacking or less developed. What is more, through these efforts we come to realize that this problem is not one-dimensional. Literacy is not simply a matter of being or not-being literate. There are degrees and different forms of literacy. Measuring these degrees is also not simply a matter of establishing the extent of schooling. This is especially true, if we look at literacy in ancient societies, with no or only a much less standardized educational system. Focusing on early imperial China, this talk tries to review the means we have at our disposal as well as the limitations we are facing, when we try to say something about the forms and purposes of literacy in ancient societies.

Enno Giele completed his Ph.D., at the Free University of Berlin and currently holds the position of Assistant Professor, East Asian Studies, University of Arizona. He has a background in Chinese and Japanese Studies. Along with extended stays at the Academia Sinica in Taibei, he has taught Ancient Chinese history at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster, Germany, and the University of California, Berkeley, before coming to the University of Arizona. Professor Giele’s research interests focus on early China (up to the Han and Sanguo periods), its institutions, social structure, and material as well as everyday culture. Pet projects include early Chinese manuscripts, ancient literacy and the public, as well as games and the loo in early China.

Posted by zzhu at 02:10 PM

February 02, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Andrew Mertha


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Andrew Mertha (PhD, '01), Associate Professor of Government, Cornell University

Ambivalent Allies: China, Cambodia, and the Politics of Mutual Resistance

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

February 8, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

In this talk, Professor Mertha will sketch the relationship between the China and Democratic Kampuchea (DK) between 1975 and 1979. His particular focus is on Chinese foreign aid, infrastructure assistance, and trade, and he argues that the Sino-DK relationship was complex and contradictory, reflecting the domestic convulsions of the two countries as it evolved. It was not simply a response to the downturn in Sino-Vietnamese relations; nor was it a function of revolutionary solidarity. Beijing’s support for the regime in Phnom Penh was based on international commercial and strategic interests which suggest important continuities with Chinese external aid, assistance, and investment today.

Andrew Mertha is associate professor of government at Cornell University, specializing in Chinese and Cambodian politics. His Ph.D. (2001) is from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Professor Mertha has written two books, The Politics of Piracy: Intellectual Property in Contemporary China (Cornell University Press, 2005) and China’s Water Warriors: Citizen Action and Policy Change (Cornell University Press, 2008) and has articles published in The China Quarterly, Comparative Politics, International Organization, and Orbis/. He has provided public testimony for the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, briefed the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, and in July 2009 accompanied a U.S. congressional staff delegation to Beijing, Xinjiang, and Shanghai to discuss issues of terrorism and narcotics trafficking. He has appeared on National Public Radio, the British Broadcasting Corporation, and Voice of America. Altogether he has lived in China for seven years as an English teacher (1988-1989), a representative for a toy company (1991-1994, 1995, and 1996), and as a scholar (1998-present). Professor Mertha is a member of the American Political Science Association, the Association for Asian Studies, and the National Committee on US-China Relations, and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Comparative Politics.

Posted by zzhu at 11:44 AM

January 27, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Scott Cook


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Scott Cook (顾史考) (PhD, '95), Professor of Chinese, Grinnell College

Deciphering the Guodian and Shanghai-Museum Bamboo Manuscripts: Reflections on Twelve Years of Research

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

February 1, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

As China’s earliest physical manuscripts containing philosophical texts, the Guodian Chu Bamboo manuscripts, and subsequently discovered Shanghai-Museum Manuscripts, have promised to help reshape the way we conceive the intellectual history of the Warring States period. After twelve years of research, however, many problems remain in their interpretation, at the same time that other puzzles have been solved. This talk will present an overview of where we currently stand in that process.

Scott Cook received his Ph.D. in Chinese from the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan in 1995 and is currently Professor of Chinese at Grinnell College, where he has been teaching since 1996. He specializes in pre-Qin textual studies and early Chinese intellectual history. He is author of the book Guodian Chujian xian-Qin rushu hongweiguan (The Pre-Imperial Confucian Texts of Guodian: Broad and Focused Perspectives) (Taipei: Xuesheng shuju, 2006), editor of Hiding the World in the World: Uneven Discourses on the Zhuangzi (Albany: SUNY Press, 2003), and the author of over forty articles in English and Chinese.

Posted by zzhu at 12:22 PM

January 18, 2011

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Miranda Brown


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Miranda Brown, Associate Professor of Early Chinese History and Culture, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, University of Michigan

"The Ills that Do Not Ail": Reflections on the Political Origins of Medical Prophylaxis in China

January 25, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The Chinese medical tradition has long been known for its emphasis on prophylaxis, an emphasis seen in calls for physicians to treat asymptomatic illnesses or “ills that do not ail.” In this presentation, I attempt to trace the history of this key concept, which is first found in classics of statecraft of the third century BC – some three centuries before its appearance in medical texts. Through these methods of inquiry, I show that the Han medical tradition (206 BC-AD 200) was indebted to earlier masters of statecraft, who provided medical thinkers with a useful framework and idiom for conceptualizing illness.

Professor Brown has taught early Chinese history and culture in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures since 2002. She is the author of The Politics of Mourning in Early China (Albany: SUNY 2007), and is currently working on a book entitled “The Many Faces of Early Chinese Medicine.”

Posted by zzhu at 01:42 PM

December 15, 2010

Winter 2011 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Xiaofei Tian


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Xiaofei Tian
Professor of Chinese Literature, Harvard University

Castration for the People: The Structure of Violence in Hao Ran’s (1932-2008) Fiction

January 18, 2011
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Hao Ran, the epic poet of socialist China, was the most popular writer of the Cultural Revolution period (1966-1976). His novels depicting rural north China, Bright Sky and Great Road of Golden Light, have sold millions of copies in the 1960s and 1970s. Focusing on one of Hao Ran’s short stories, this talk analyzes the structure of violence in Hao Ran’s fiction.

Xiaofei Tian received her B.A. from Beijing University in 1989 and her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Harvard University in 1998. Her research interests include Chinese literature and culture, manuscript culture, book history, the history of ideas, and world literature. Her major research field is the literature, social history and cultural history of early medieval China. She has also published and taught courses on classical vernacular fiction, the literature of the Republican era, the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), and contemporary Chinese literary and cultural issues. She is the author of Tao Yuanming and Manuscript Culture: The Record of a Dusty Table (2005) and Beacon Fire and Shooting Star: The Literary Culture of the Liang (502-557) (2007). Her Chinese publications include a book on the sixteenth-century Chinese novel The Plum in the Golden Vase, a book on Sappho, a book on the Moorish Spain, a collection of articles on premodern and modern Chinese literature and culture, and several works of translation. She is also a writer who published several books of poetry and essays. Her new book, Visionary Journeys: Travel Writings from Early Medieval and Nineteenth-century China, is forthcoming from Harvard University Asia Center Press. She is currently working on a book manuscript on nostalgia for the Three Kingdoms period, as well as a study and translation of a late nineteenth-century manuscript on the traumatic childhood memory of the Taiping Rebellion.

Posted by zzhu at 03:35 PM

December 02, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Alice Yao


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LAST PRESENTATION OF FALL 2010
Sarmatian Mirrors and "Han" Ingots (100 BC - AD 100): How the Foreign became Local and Vice Versa

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

December 7, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Lead ingots from China and bronze mirrors from the Caucasus present two distinctive kinds of hybrid objects borrowing from mixed cultural traditions. Because the material origins of these objects cannot be easily identified, they present oddities that defy classification and are sometimes referred to as imitations. To what extent are these objects tokens of cultural identity emerging along ancient trade routes? This presentation examines the ways cultural tradition, authenticity, and differences are understood in material terms.

Professor Yao received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan in 2008 and is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her current project is a collaborative archaeological survey investigating the dimensions of Han imperial incorporation of Bronze Age societies in Yunnan during the first millennium B.C.

Posted by zzhu at 08:38 PM

November 24, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Emily Hannum


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Examinations and Educational Opportunity in China: Mobility and Bottlenecks for the Rural Poor

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

November 30, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

China’s educational examination systems can be viewed as a transparent basis for allocating opportunities for mobility and as a convenient tool for social intervention to ameliorate past social injustices. At the same time, these systems can serve as both a barrier to and source of mobility for certain vulnerable populations. This project, co-authored by Xuehui An, China Ministry of Education and Sebastian Cherng, University of Pennsylvania, offers an overview of the evolution of high school and college entrance examination systems in China, then focuses on how these systems shape opportunities for one vulnerable group of great contemporary policy interest in China: the rural poor. Using data from the Gansu Survey of Children and Families, a project that that has been following a cohort of 2000 youth from 100 villages in one of China’s poorest provinces since the year 2000, they trace progress through upper secondary and tertiary education, with special attention to social selection in exam taking and outcomes, and to the role of examinations in shaping subsequent educational opportunities.

Emily Hannum is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on education, child and youth welfare, and social inequality, particularly in China. In China, she has conducted research on gender, ethnic, and geographic disparities in education and employment, changes in the impact of education on income and occupational attainment under market reforms, rural teachers and their links to student outcomes, and children's and adolescents' welfare under market reforms. Recent publications include "Beyond Cost: Rural Perspectives on Barriers to Education" (with Jennifer Adams, in Creating Wealth and Poverty in China, edited by Deborah Davis and Wang Feng, 2008, Stanford University Press) and “Gender-Based Employment Differences in Urban China: Considering the Contributions of Marriage and Parenthood.” (with Yuping Zhang and Meiyan Wang, Social Forces, 2008). Professor Hannum co-directs the Gansu Survey of Children and Families, a collaborative, longitudinal study of children's welfare in rural northwest China, and she is a co-editor of the series Research in Sociology of Education and the journal Comparative Education Review.

Posted by zzhu at 07:39 PM

November 18, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Paize Keulemans


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Scandalous Writing: Gossip, News, and Rumor in Jin Ping Mei

November 23, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This paper investigates a particularly scandalous late-imperial novel, the erotic Classic Jin Ping Mei (The Plum in the Golden Vase) to argue that gossip functioned as productive narrative form both in this novel itself and the various literary discourses surrounding it. In particular, I will focus on the way overhearing and hearsay in the novel provide structure to this sprawling one-hundred chapter narrative, just as gossipy writing about the novel provides a sense of community amongst late-imperial readers and writers. This novel form of scandalous writing, I argue, should be understood in the context of the blossoming of late-imperial print-culture and a media saturated society in which the production, circulation, and consumption of gossip were reflective of a typically late-Ming, early-Qing interest in contemporary affairs and scandalous news.

Paize Keulemans received his Ph.D. from the East Asian Languages and Cultures Department of the University of Chicago in 2005. Since then, he has taught at Columbia University as a fellow at the Society of Fellows, and he now teaches late-imperial Chinese literature at the department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale. He has just finished a book manuscript entitled "'Sound rising from the Paper: Chinese Martial Arts Fiction and the Late Imperial Acoustic Imagination," which investigates the role printed sound plays in the production of acoustic spectacle on the page. He is now working on a second project that deals with the theme of gossip, rumor, and news in the seventeenth-century Chinese literature.

Posted by zzhu at 09:21 PM

November 10, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Jacques deLisle


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In Search of China’s Development Model: Beyond the Beijing Consensus

November 16, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Jacques deLisle is the Stephen A. Cozen Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, and Director of the Asia Program at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. He teaches on Chinese law, China and international law, international law, and Chinese politics and foreign relations. His scholarship focuses on legal reform and its relationship to economic reform and political change in contemporary China, the international status of Taiwan and cross-Strait relations, China’s engagement with the international order, legal and political issues in Hong Kong before and after reversion to China, and aspects of U.S.-China relations. He has a J.D. degree from Harvard, was in the Ph.D. program in political science at Harvard, and received his A.B. from Princeton. He clerked for Stephen Breyer (then chief judge of the First Circuit Court of Appeals) and served as attorney-adviser in the Office of Legal Council, U.S. Department of Justice where his work focused on separation of powers and foreign affairs law, including China issues.

Posted by zzhu at 09:20 PM

November 03, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Terry Sicular


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Inequality in China: Challenges to a Harmonious Society

November 9, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Under the Hu-Wen leadership China has shifted from a reform program that emphasizes growth to one that balances growth with the pursuit of a “harmonious society.” The harmonious society program is a response to rapid increases in inequality during the 1990s, and its aim is to ensure that the benefits from growth are shared more widely. In fact, have the benefits from growth been shared more widely? Has income inequality increased or decreased during the Hu-Wen era? Drawing on recent findings from the China Household Income Project, a collaborative survey research project monitoring changes in incomes and inequality, Professor Sicular will discuss recent trends in inequality in China.

Terry Sicular is Professor of Economics at the University of Western Ontario. She received her doctorate at Yale and has taught in the past at Stanford and Harvard. She is a specialist on the Chinese economy, speaks Mandarin, and has been studying and traveling to China for over 30 years. In the past her research focused on China’s rural economy, especially topics related to agricultural prices and market reforms. More recently she has been studying incomes and inequality in China, as well as questions regarding educational attainment and transmission, and the impact of housing reforms on household income and wealth. She has published widely in scholarly journals and some books, including as a contributor and co-editor of Inequality and Public Policy, published by Cambridge University Press in 2008. She has served as a consultant to international donor organizations, and is a co-leader in the ongoing, China Household Income Project, a collaborative research project that conducts a nationwide household survey and monitors trends in China’s incomes and inequality.

Posted by zzhu at 07:36 PM

October 28, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Lydia Li


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Care Receiving of Older Persons in Rural and Urban China

November 2, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

As a result of increased life expectancy, the number of people who need long-term care due to chronic illness and impairment is growing rapidly in China. This rising demand for care occurs in a time when the Chinese society, including the health care and family systems, is in transition. This study aims to understand how older Chinese meet their need for care, compares the experience of rural and urban elders, and sheds light on old-age support policy in China

Lydia Li is an associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Social Work. Her area of research is aging, specifically home and community-based long-term care. She has conducted studies related to stress and coping of family caregivers, physical and mental health of home care elders in the United States. In recent years, she extended her research to China. Currently she is working on a project about quality of care and quality of life of older persons and their caregivers in China.

Posted by zzhu at 01:52 PM

October 14, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Melanie Manion


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Managed Representation for Authoritarian Rule: Congresses with Constituents, Constituents without Congresses in China

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

October 26, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

For decades, congresses of elected representatives in China have been dismissed as rubber stamp legislatures, but they have become real political players in recent years. Their new assertiveness presents a puzzle as it was set in motion by rules designed and promoted by authoritarian rulers in Beijing. How can rules that empower elected representatives strengthen authoritarianism? Professor Manion draws on qualitative evidence and original survey data to answer this question, illuminating core features of Chinese "authoritarian resilience."

Melanie Manion is Professor of Political Science and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to her current appointment, she was an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Rochester, where she taught for ten years. She studied philosophy and political economy at Peking University in 1978-80, and her research on Chinese politics has taken her regularly to mainland China since the mid-1980s. Her previous work analyzes Chinese bureaucratic politics, grassroots electoral democratization, and the political economy of good governance. Her current project investigates representation by asking how newly assertive local Chinese congresses navigate their agency relationships with the communist party and ordinary constituents.

She is the recipient of numerous research awards, most recently from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, and University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School. Publications include Contemporary Chinese Politics: New Sources, Methods, and Field Strategies (co-edited, Cambridge, 2010), Corruption by Design: Building Clean Government in Mainland China and Hong Kong (Harvard, 2004), Retirement of Revolutionaries in China: Public Policies, Social Norms, Private Interests (Princeton, 1993), and articles in the American Political Science Review, Comparative Political Studies, China Quarterly, and Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization. She is an award-winning teacher.

Posted by zzhu at 10:19 PM

October 07, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Pierre Landry


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Is The Volcano Still Quiet? Popular Views on Equality and Redistribution in Contemporary China

Part of Alumni Lecture Series: The coming academic year marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies. Many events are being planned to mark this historic milestone, including inviting our alumni to give some of the presentations in the CCS Noon Lecture Series. We hope you will be able to join us for all of the many interesting noon lectures planned for this coming year and next.

October 12, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Based on a collaborative study that begun in 2004 with a survey on "Inequality and Redistributive Justice in China," Landry examines the extent to which the findings of the first wave reported in Martin Whyte's Myth of the Social Volcano (Stanford, 2010) still hold. The empirical evidence draws on a unique two-wave panel in which nearly 700 respondents who were-interviewed in 2009, as well as fresh cross-section representative survey on China also taken in 2009.

Pierre F. Landry is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Yale University and a research fellow with the Research Center for Contemporary China at Peking University. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Michigan in 2000. He is also an alumnus of the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies. Landry is the author of Decentralized Authoritarianism in China (CUP, 2008) and a co-investigator of several survey projects in China, including national surveys of "Legal Reforms" (2004), "Inequality & Distributive Justice" (2004 and 2009), "The China Survey" (2008) as well as local studies on "Education in Rural Yunnan" (2004) and "Elections in Shandong and Henan" (2005 and 2010). Most of his survey work makes use of spatial sampling with GPS, as technique developed in collaboration with the RCCC. He is also consultant with the UNDP in Hanoi on projects related to Public Administration and Legal reforms in Vietnam.

Posted by zzhu at 10:21 PM

September 29, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Chuen-Fung Wong

Representing the Uyghur Musical Other in Modern Chinese Music

October 5, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

This talk concerns the orientalizing strategies employed in constructing a minority otherness through the large amount of post-1950s minority-styled Chinese musical compositions, with reference to elements and styles appropriated from the traditional music of the Uyghur people, Turkic-speaking Muslims in the northwestern Chinese province of Xinjiang. The "good-at-singing-and-dancing" discourse so often constructed in these minority-themed musical performances, I suggest, bears significant implications for Chinese musical nationalism and modernity in the twentieth century. This talk also contributes to the broader discussion of musical exoticism and minority politics in modern Chinese performing arts.

Chuen-Fung Wong received a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from University of California, Los Angeles, in 2006, and is currently Assistant Professor of Music at Macalester College, Minnesota. His research interests include Uyghur music and minority modernity in China, as well as the music of the guqin (seven-string zither). He is the editor and co-author of Listening to Chinese Music (Hong Kong: Commercial Press, 2009).

RELATED TALK by Chuen-Fung Wong at U-M:
Confucius Institute Roundtable Discussion:

Uyghur popular music and minority nationalism in China

维吾尔族流行音乐研究

Monday, October 4, 2010 - 4:00PM
Great Lakes South, Palmer Commons
University of Michigan Central Campus
100 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI

Light refreshments will be served.

Posted by zzhu at 03:44 PM

September 23, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Lydia Chiang

Xu Xuan (916–991) and Classical Chinese Records of Anomalies

September 28, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Xu Xuan, a prominent early Song dynasty scholar official and philologist, was the author of a collection of writing in the long-standing classical Chinese tradition of recording cosmic and human anomalies. While serving on the editing teams of Taiping yulan and Taiping guangji, a complementary pair of encyclopedias designed to promote the political and cultural legitimacy of a new imperial dynasty, Xu Xuan incorporated in Taiping guangji his own records of anomalies. The Taiping guangji later became the single most authoritative source of classical Chinese strange tales and defines the genre as we know it today. By analyzing Xu Xuan's literary representations of anomalies, this paper examines the roles Xu Xuan played in the imperial construction of norms and canons in the early Song era.

Sing-chen Lydia Chiang is Associate Professor of Chinese at Boston College and author of Collecting the Self: Body and Identity in Strange Tale Collections of Late Imperial China (Brill 2005). Her current research focuses on the contributions of the Taiping guangji to the historica.

Posted by zzhu at 09:11 PM

September 09, 2010

Fall 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Richard Kraus

China’s Cultural Revolution Arts: A Posthumous Life

September 21, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The arts of the Cultural Revolution, such as the ballet The Red Detachment of Women, were created in the heat of the moment, to spread revolutionary passion, or at least to shore up the political positions of radicals in the Cultural Revolution. There was little idea of creating eternal classics. Since the end of the Maoist era, these works have enjoyed an odd afterlife, neither as art nor as agitprop, but as icons, deployed anew in very different political and cultural contexts. These Cultural Revolution icons appear to link us to China's tumultuous 1966-1976 decade, yet their irony and cynicism may impede coming to terms with the movement's complex heritage, both in China and abroad.

Richard Kraus is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of Oregon. A specialist on China's cultural politics, he has written on the Cultural Revolution, the political history of the piano, the changing social role of calligraphy, the impact of economic reform on artists, and the international politics of China's arts.

Posted by zzhu at 08:31 PM

February 15, 2010

CANCELED - Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Robert Adams

CANCELED: We regret that due to unforeseen circumstances, the presentation by Robert Adams scheduled for Tuesday, February 16, has been canceled. We hope to reschedule at some point in the not-too-distant future.

Background Beijing Urban House: Qing Shui Yuan and Linked Hybrid as Non-Identical Topological Twins

February 16, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Strategically located in Beijing at the Second Ring Road and Airport Expressway is an intricate morphological knot of civic infrastructure and social housing. Elevated above the ground, recently constructed highway space swarms a complex urban situation that is as much physical as it is psychological. In the northeast quadrant is the acrobatic housing project, Linked Hybrid, designed by American architect Steven Holl. To the south is Qing Shui Yuan, a massive urban housing complex constructed in the 1989 by the Fifth Construction Company to house workers of Beijing's Municipal Public Utilities -- the people responsible for the infrastructural management of the city. On one side of the expressway is the desire engine, an architectural spectacle of emerging capital lodging itself in the domestic psyche; while on the other, the civic worker maintains everyday operations of the city. Passing below the elevated expressway are the daily routines of people and labor, while above on the road the money and goods move out. This situation represents a diabolical diagram for early 21st century urbanism in the People's Republic of China, and one that will impact the future of how urban morphology is theorized and practiced throughout the world. Given the robust development of early 21st century urbanism in China, how will the attributes of this massive project be refracted into the world? What is being simultaneously invented by the project of high-speed urbanization in China, and how will this change the way designers conceptualize and open the channels for the urban imaginary?

Robert Adams is an Assistant Professor in Architecture at Taubman College, and Faculty Associate at Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan. Adams is a co-founder of B.A.S.E., Beijing Architecture Studio Enterprise, located in the urban village of Caochangdi in Beijing. His work in China has focused on urban housing, highway infrastructure, and many vivid material practices from architecture to fashion design. Adams' work has been exhibited at the 3rd Architecture Biennial Beijing, Shenzhen University College of Architecture and Urban Planning, and Tianjin University College of Architecture. Together with Dawn Gilpin, he is a principal of Adams + Gilpin, a design studio located in a strip mall in Ann Arbor. Adams current design work focuses on issues of new urban mobility for people with an extreme range of ability.

Posted by zzhu at 01:32 PM

January 27, 2010

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Bridie Andrews-Minehan

Blood and Self in Modern Chinese Medicine and Culture

April 13, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

What does it mean when our understandings of vital body functions changes? This presentation traces the mapping of modern-medical ideas about blood onto pre-existing medical and cultural understandings in China. Through blood, we will explore how cultural exchange has affected the lived experience of the body, the self, and community. Blood is used as both medium and metaphor for the creation of a Chinese modernity.

Bridie Andrews-Minehan completed a PhD in the history of medicine at Cambridge University, has held posts at SOAS, University of London, and Harvard University. She is currently Assistant Professor at Bentley University in the Boston area. This talk draws material from her forthcoming book Medicine, Culture and Modernity in China.

Posted by zzhu at 03:36 PM

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Nicholas Howson

Dirty Water - The Danone-Wahaha Battle and Law, Politics and Contested Value in the PRC

April 6, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

On September 30, 2009, the long dispute between Hanzhou's Wahaha and Danone of France was settled, with the French multinational agreeing to sell its 51% equity stake in as many as 39 joint ventures to Wahaha for just US$300 million. The battle had spawned complex litigation and arbitrations in the PRC, Europe, and North America, and a bitter, inflammatory, campaign by Wahaha and its founder Zong Qinghou alleging foreign misappropriation of Chinese value and broadly condemning the direct foreign investment regime in place since the late 1970s. In his presentation, Professor Howson will describe the long-running dispute, its setting amidst pronounced global trade imbalance, the legal, commercial and political arguments of each side, and finally what the dispute means for China's legal system and its legal institutions going forward.

Nicholas Calcina Howson is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Law School, and a graduate of Williams College (B.A., 1983) and the Columbia Law School (J.D., 1988). Prior to Law School, he spent two years (1983-5) as a graduate fellow at Fudan University in Shanghai doing work in late Qing Dynasty Chinese literature. In the Autumn of 1988, he returned to China on a CLEEC/Ford Foundation fellowship to complete research at Beijing University in Qing penal law. Professor Howson joined the New York-based international law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP in 1988, and was elected partner of that firm in 1996. Between 1988 and 2003, Howson worked out of the firm’s New York headquarters, and also had extended postings in London, Paris and Beijing, finally as a managing partner of the firm’s China Practice based in Beijing. Howson is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York and a designated foreign arbitrator for the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC) in Beijing, and is a past Chairman of the Asian Affairs Committee of the New York Bar Association. In 2008-9, he represented Danone in the Danone-Wahaha disputes.

Posted by zzhu at 03:33 PM

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Michele Matteini

Experience of the Studio: Luo Ping's Copy of Three Horse Paintings by the Zhao Family

March 30, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Rarely do Chinese artists speak of their formative years. This talk introduces a close copy after a 14th c. set of horse paintings that Luo Ping (1733-1799) completed in 1762. It will be argued that the act of copying provided Luo an opportunity to reminisce over his exchange with his mentor Jin Nong (1687-1763) and reflect upon issues of artistic transmission, originality, and appropriation- three aspects central to Jin Nong studio practice.

Michele Matteini is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. His dissertation positions the late career of the artist Luo Ping (1733-1799) in relation to the contemporary intellectual movement known as ‘evidential scholarship’ (kaozheng), with particular attention to Luo Ping’s exchange with the Beijing scholarly circles. He has been one of the curators of the exhibition, “Eccentric Visions: The Worlds of Luo Ping (1733-1799),” currently on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Posted by zzhu at 03:30 PM

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Richard Baum

Confessions of a Peking Tom: A China Odyssey

March 23, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Professor Baum will discuss his new book, China Watcher: Confessions of a Peking Tom. Part memoir, part travelogue, part critique of the China field, and part commentary on China's post-Mao quest for 'wealth and power,' Baum's book has been described by the New Yorker's Evan Osnos as "a wonderfully funny and revealing chronicle of adventure....Baum's odyssey through four decades of China's rise reminds us that true friendship to China requires not only patience, but honesty. As the Chinese expression puts it, he has dared to step off his horse to examine the flowers up-close." CCS affiliates will be particularly interested in Professor Baum's humorous observations and personal anecdotes concerning his long and complicated professional relationship with the late U-M Sinological icon, Michel Oksenberg.

A prominent member of the U.S. China-watching community, Richard Baum is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UCLA. Former director of the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies, he has written and lectured extensively on contemporary Chinese politics, political economy, and foreign policy. He is the author/editor of nine books, including Burying Mao: Chinese Politics in the Age of Deng Xiaoping (Princeton, 1996); Reform and Reaction in Post-Mao China: The Road to Tiananmen (Routledge, 1991); and Prelude to Revolution: Mao, the Party, and the Peasant Question, 1962-66 (Columbia,, 1975). His latest book, released this spring, is China Watcher: Confessions of a Peking Tom. In addition to his academic pursuits, Professor Baum is the founder and manager of Chinapol, the world's leading online listserv for professional China analysts. He is a frequent commentator on Chinese and East Asian politics for the BBC World Service, Voice of America, CNN International, and National Public Radio. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Posted by zzhu at 03:28 PM

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Bill Baxter

Sounds from the Ground: Recently Excavated Warring-States Texts and the Linguistic Reconstruction of Early Chinese

March 16, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Recent archaeological excavations from before 221 BCE (when China was unified under the Qín dynasty) have produced a large corpus of texts written on bamboo strips, whose script is significantly different from the standard script of later centuries. This talk will illustrate what these texts can tell us about the early pronunciation of the Chinese language.

Bill Baxter (Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, Department of Linguistics) is a linguist specializing in the history of the Chinese language, and author of A Handbook of Old Chinese Phonology (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 1992). He is currently collaborating with Laurent Sagart (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris) on an improved reconstruction of the pronunciation, vocabulary, and morphology of Old Chinese, the language of the pre-Qín period.

Posted by zzhu at 03:07 PM

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Christian de Pee

The Song Is You: Histories of the Song Dynasty (960-1279 CE) in the United States

March 9, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

The founders of Song history in the United States—E. A. Kracke, Jr., James T. C. Liu, and Robert M. Hartwell—abandoned the philological tradition of European sinologists in favor of the social sciences. Following the example of Chinese and Japanese scholars of the 1920s and 1930s, they used statistical methods and a sociological vocabulary to examine social mobility, factional politics, and economic development. The second generation of Song historians tested the hypotheses of their teachers at the local level, preferring county gazetteers and funerary inscriptions to dynastic histories and imperial edicts. In recent years, a third generation of Song scholars has deemed the positivist social-science approaches of both preceding generations unsuited to Song-dynasty sources and has returned to some of the methods and topics preferred of pre-War sinologists, such as philology, historiography, literati culture, and the religious aspects of imperial government. Histories of the Song dynasty in the United States have contributed to the knowledge of the Chinese past, but they also illustrate the political and academic history of the post-War United States.

Christian de Pee is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Michigan. He is the author of The Writing of Weddings in Middle-Period China: Text and Ritual Practice in the Eighth through Fourteenth Centuries (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2007). His current research examines the emergence of the city into writing during the eleventh century.

Posted by zzhu at 11:16 AM

January 25, 2010

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Jason McGrath

Reevaluating Chinese Cinematic Realism in the Age of the Digital

February 23, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

How does digital technology change the ontology of the cinematic image, and specifically how has Chinese film responded creatively to these changes in recent years? This talk will explore these questions first with reference to the recent films of Jia Zhangke, the leading "urban generation" director whose earlier realist aesthetic has been increasingly challenged by his own practices in later films. This will lead to a broader discussion of the boom in underground "amateur" filmmaking made possible by digital technology as well as the prominence of CGI digital effects in recent big-budget blockbuster action films from China.

Jason McGrath is Associate Professor of Chinese film and literature at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities. He is the author of Postsocialist Modernity: Chinese Cinema, Literature, and Criticism in the Market Age, and his essays on Chinese film have appeared in various journals and anthologies. His current projects include a collection of translated Chinese critical writings on film and a book manuscript entitled "Inscribing the Real."

Posted by zzhu at 01:36 PM

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Xiaobing Tang

On Socialist Conceptual Art

February 9, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Through a study of the complex process that led to the creation of "The Blood-Stained Shirt" by Wang Shikuo (1911-1973), one of the most important artists in mid-20th century China, I will explore the implications of this form of art.

Xiaobing Tang is Helmut F. Stern Professor of Modern Chinese Studies in Asian Languages and Cultures and Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan. His research interests include modern and contemporary Chinese literature and art.

Posted by zzhu at 01:24 PM

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Judith Zeitlin

Specters on Screen in Chinese Opera Film: A Case Study of A Test of Love (Qingtan, 1958)

February 2, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Between 1953 and 1966 some 115 opera films were made in the People's Republic of China, but because of anti-superstition campaigns, only 3 were adaptations of traditional ghost plays. My talk examines the complex history of the earliest and most interesting of these, the all-female Yue opera film of A Test of Love. I will pay particular attention to the interpenetration of different regional opera genres in the stage productions that led up to the film and to the ways in which theatrical conventions for portraying ghosts were re-imagined cinematically.

Judith T. Zeitlin is Professor in Chinese Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. Among her many publications are The Phantom Heroine: Ghosts and Gender in Seventeenth-Century Chinese Literature and (co-edited) Thinking with Cases: Specialist Knowledge in Chinese Cultural History (both University of Hawai'i Press, 2007). She is co-editing a special issue on Chinese opera film for The Opera Quarterly due out in the fall of 2010 and working on other projects related to music, food, and illustrated books.

Posted by zzhu at 01:21 PM

January 21, 2010

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Miranda Brown

Modeling Early Chinese Medicine: Reflections on the Relationship Between Law and Science

January 26, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

When historians speak of legal influences on Chinese science, they tend to do so in negative terms. They highlight what features of Western law were missing in the Chinese tradition and explain the specific content of the Chinese tradition in terms of those absences. Joseph Needham, for example, pointed out that the Chinese lacked a notion of a divine lawgiver; Chinese natural thinkers were thus not inclined to seek laws of nature. In this presentation, I propose that we can also investigate the relationship between law and science in positive terms: What features were present in the Chinese legal tradition, and how did these features shape the scientific tradition?

Miranda Brown is U-M Associate Professor of Early Chinese Culture in the Dept. of Asian Languages and Culture. She received her doctorate in history at the University of California, Berkeley in 2002, and joined the faculty at the University of Michigan at that time. Her book The Politics of Mourning in Early China, was published by Albany: State University of New York Press in 2007.

Posted by zzhu at 04:10 PM

January 07, 2010

Winter 2010 CCS Noon Lecture Series - Thomas Buoye

Christian Chroniclers of Chinese Cruelty: Western Misperceptions of Chinese Criminal Justice

January 19, 2010
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

For a variety of psychological, political and economic reasons, Western observers have historically misrepresented China's legal heritage and criminal justice system. At least since the eighteenth century, critics have cited several infamous "miscarriages" of justice involving Westerners to illustrate the inequity of Chinese law. A variety of facile dichotomies often have obfuscated rather than illuminated China's legal heritage. These include the oversimplified notion of Confucian versus Legalist ideologies and the Weberian-inspired constructions of modern/rational versus traditional/irrational law. Similarly, the conflation of the legal practices and institutions of the People's Republic of China with the imperial institutions has contributed to Western misunderstandings. This presentation will examine one wellspring of misinformation, Christian missionaries' depictions of Chinese criminal justice.

Tom Buoye is associate professor and chair of the History Department at the University of Tulsa. His dissertation on violent disputes over property rights in eighteenth-century Guangdong was directed by Albert Feuerwerker and Ernest Young. Most recently he has been working on Qing legal history, particularly the administration of capital punishment.

Posted by zzhu at 04:22 PM

September 17, 2009

Martin Powers

Visualizing the State in Early Modern England and China

December 8, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Martin Powers is a Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures at the University of Michigan; Former Director of the U-M Center for Chinese Studies

It has been said that the frontispiece to Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan was an early attempt to imagine something very difficult to imagine—the sovereign, the people, and the state—as a single, visually unified entity. Such abstractions did not come easily to the people of premodern times, yet such abstractions were necessary in the formation of the modern state. In China, too, both theorizing and visualizing the relationship between the sovereign, the people, and the state had become a necessity by early modern times. This paper explores the differences between the Hobbsian model and that of Song China and, sidestepping culturalist models, situates those differences in different traditions of fiscal and legal practice.

Martin Powers is Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures at the University of Michigan, and former Director of the Center for Chinese Studies. His research focuses on the role of the arts in the history of human relations in China, with an emphasis on issues of personal agency and social justice. In 1993 his Art and Political Expression in Early China received the Levenson Prize for the best book in pre-twentieth century Chinese Studies. His Pattern and Person: Ornament, Society, and Self in Classical China, was published by Harvard University Press East Asian Series in 2006 and has been awarded the Levenson Prize for 2008. This year he is at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton writing a book on the role of "China" in the cultural politics of the English garden.

Posted by kanepark at 05:27 PM

Mary Ann Ray

Caochangdi : Beijing Inside Out

December 1, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Mary Ann Ray, Taubman Centennial Professor of Practice at the University of Michigan

Caochangdi : Beijing Inside Out - Farmers, Floaters, Taxi Drivers, Artists, and the International Art Mob Challenge and Remake the City is a recently published book focusing on Caochangdi - one of nearly 500 urban villages in the city of Beijing. Caochangdi tells a specific story about itself and its 4,000 to 7,000 mostly illegal residents, but it also has embedded within it both the problems and the possibilities of a new urban space redefining the city of Beijing (and other Asian cities) at the pivotal point in human history where cities make up 50% of the population of the world. The range of inhabitants includes an illegal rural migrant cook for a sewer construction crew to world renowned contemporary artist Ai Weiwei.

Mary-Ann Ray is the Taubman Centennial Professor of Practice at the University of Michigan. Together with Robert Mangurian, she is a Principal of Studio Works Architects in Los Angeles, a co-founder of BASE Beijing in the Urban Village of Caochangdi in Beijing. Mangurian and Ray are architects, authors, and designers, and were awarded the Chrysler Design Award in 2001 for Excellence and Innovation in an ongoing body of work in a design field. In 2008, they were awarded the Stirling Prize for the Memorial Lecture on the City by the Canadian Centre for Architecture and the London School of Economics. Mangurian and Ray’s current interests have led them to work on urban change in China, especially as seen in Urban Villages such as Caochangdi and the potential for change in the New Socialist Countryside and Villages.

Posted by kanepark at 05:26 PM

Lara R. Kusnetzky

Embodying National Liberation: History and Autobiography in the Gejiu Tin Mines since 1949

November 24, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Lara R. Kusnetzky, Ph.D. Candidate, Graduate Center at the City University of New York

On the eve of the founding of the People’s Republic of China, in September 1949, Mao Zedong declared that “the Chinese people have stood up.” The downtrodden masses, their bodies broken by the forces of semi-feudal and semi-colonial oppression, had been liberated and had emerged from their dark factories and dank hovels into the light of the socialist dawn. By equating the bodies of workers and peasants with the body politic, this metaphor also equated national history with biography. In the early decades of the People’s Republic of China, the Chinese Communist Party conducted a series of political campaigns that required local committees to collect oral histories of workers and peasants that would demonstrate in local terms the universal truths of Marxist historiography. In Gejiu, Yunnan province, national history was narrated through the shading—the pitiful tin miner of the Republican era who under the leadership of the Communist Party had become his own master and could now walk erect through safe, lighted tunnels.

Posted by kanepark at 05:25 PM

Wang Zheng

Revealing Erasures: Visual Representation of Women of China: 1949-2009

Select images from this presentation can be found here.

November 17, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Wang Zheng, U-M Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and History

Examining the covers of the official magazine Women of China over the span of 60 years, this presentation traces diverse interplays and contentions between the male-dominated central power, state feminists, and women of diverse social locations in the socialist period, and transformations of their relations in the market economy. The research is part of a large project on a history of the PRC from gender perspective.

Wang Zheng is associate professor of Women’s Studies and History and associate research scientist of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. A long-term academic activist promoting gender studies in China, she is the director of the UM-China Gender Studies Project, and founder and co-director of the UM-Fudan Joint Institute for Gender Studies at Fudan University, Shanghai. Her English publications concern changing gender discourses and relations in China's socioeconomic, political and cultural transformations of the past century, and feminism in China, both in terms of its historical development and its contemporary activism in the context of globalization. She is the author of Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories (UC Press, 1999). Her current project is a gender history of the People’s Republic of China, exploring the relationship between gender and the socialist state formation, and gender and capitalist transformation. She has edited volumes (both in English and Chinese) on a variety of topics: the constructions of feminist subjectivity in socialist China, the politics and effects of translating feminisms in China throughout the twentieth century, and significance of introducing “gender” into the study of Chinese history as well as into the discursive contentions in contemporary China.

Posted by kanepark at 05:23 PM

Lucille Chia

A Sea Change in Chinese Printing and Book Culture: Chinese Books and Printing in Early Spanish Philippines

November 10, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Lucille Chia, Associate Professor of History, University of California at Riverside

This talk concerns the diffusion of printing in Chinese across the sea in Southeast Asia in the early modern period. Given the vital involvement of the Chinese settlers and sojourners in the commerce and service industries of the Spanish Philippines, it is no surprise that some of them were instrumental in developing the earliest printing and publishing enterprises of the colony in the late sixteenth century. They produced books in Chinese, Japanese, Tagalog, Spanish, and Latin, including religious works published under the auspices of Catholic missionary institutions. Furthermore, books were printed in China and Japan, sometimes specifically for different groups in the Philippines. In particular, the export of popular works published in Fujian and other parts of southern China represents a significant extension of the dissemination of Chinese books that followed the first large-scale overseas Chinese diaspora. By looking at Chinese works printed in or for readers in the Spanish Philippines, we can begin to understand how Chinese book culture adapted to and developed in the presence of other very different non-Chinese cultures and religions.

Lucille Chia is Associate Professor of History at the University of California at Riverside. Her research interests include book culture and printing in imperial China, and the Chinese diaspora in Southeast Asia in the early modern period and its impact on China.

Posted by kanepark at 05:21 PM

Yuming He

Inventorying Barbarians: An Early Modern Chinese Pictorial Vogue

November 3, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Yuming He, Assistant Professor in Chinese Literature, University of Chicago

From the 15th to 18th century, pictorial inventories of foreign countries and peoples were printed and circulated widely in China, and onto the trans-regional book market. This study attempts to bring to light the history of these popular and commonplace books, and their specific socio-cultural relevance in Ming-Qing China and the larger global world. Yuming He received her BA and MA from Peking University, and Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. She taught at Reed College before joining the faculty at the Univ. of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests include the literature and culture of late-imperial China (currently focusing on theater and performance), the history of the book (focusing on woodblock prints, both texts and images), and Chinese intellectual history.

Posted by kanepark at 05:20 PM

Carlos Rojas

Alai, Internal Diasporas, and Rethinking Sinophone Literature

October 27, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Carlos Rojas, Assistant Professor of Chinese Cultural Studies, Duke University

This talk will consider the work of the ethnically Tibetan, Chinese-language (and Mao Dun Prize-winning) author, Alai. Of particular interest will be the way in which Alai's fiction addresses issues of spatial identification and linguistic alienation, together with the broader implications of his work for our understanding of the categories of Chinese and Sinophone literature.

Carlos Rojas is Assistant Professor of Chinese Cultural Studies at Duke University. He is the author of The Naked Gaze: Reflections on Chinese Modernity (Harvard Asia Center, 2008); the co-editor (with David Der-wei Wang) of Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History (Duke, 2007) and (with Eileen Cheng-yin Chow) of Rethinking Chinese Popular Culture: Cannibalizations of the Canon (2009); and the co-translator (also with Eileen Chow) of Yu Hua's novel, Brothers (Pantheon, 2009).

Posted by kanepark at 05:19 PM

Tsering Shakya

China's Tibet Policy: Accommodation and Conflict

October 13, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Tsering Shakya, Canadian Research Chair in Religion and Contemporary Society in Asia, Institute for Asian Research, University of British Columbia

In March 2008, the Tibetan plateau erupted in a wave of protests highlighting problems faced by the PRC government in ruling the region. After five decades of direct rule, China still faces no easy solution in governing the plateau. The talk will explore China’s policies and argues that the fundamental problem confronting PRC is the question of governance, resurgence of Tibetan ethnonationalism and the perceived threat to the security of Tibetan identity.

Tsering Shakya is a world renowned and widely published scholar on both historical and contemporary Tibet. His most expansive work to date The Dragon in the Land of Snows: A History of Modern Tibet since 1947 (Pimlico, London 1999) was acclaimed as “the definitive history of modern Tibet” by The New York Times, and “a prodigious work of scholarship” by the UK’s Sunday Telegraph. The book is the first comprehensive account of Tibet’s recent history. Tsering was able to draw upon his unrivalled network of official and unofficial contacts in government, academia, religious circles and the media throughout Tibet and China, and across Asia, Europe and the U.S., including numerous, previously unpublished sources. The book received wide recognition and is now regarded as a standard text on the history of modern Tibet.

Posted by kanepark at 05:17 PM

Anna Shields

From Gossip to History: Views of Mid-Tang Literature in Anecdotal Texts

October 6, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Anna Shields, Director of the Honors College, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

The writers of Tang anecdotal texts collected many lively stories of literati culture, combining hearsay with gossip and personal opinion with historical fact. Though these memorable works have shaped our understanding of the Tang for centuries, their unusual perspective poses problems for literary historical inquiry. How might we read anecdotal texts to sort out gossip from history? This talk will explore the representation of mid-Tang literature in ninth-century anecdotal works and show how such texts reveal ongoing debates over literary culture, debates that were largely concealed by Song citation and reorganization of Tang texts.

Anna M. Shields studied Chinese literature at Harvard University (M.A.) and Indiana University (Ph.D.), and has taught at the University of Maryland, College Park, the University of Michigan, the University of Arizona, Princeton University; she is now Director of the Honors College and Associate Professor of Chinese, University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her book, Crafting a Collection: The Cultural Contexts and Poetic Practice of the Huajian ji (Collection from among the Flowers), was published by the Harvard University Asia Center in 2006. She was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities research fellowship in 2005-2006, and is currently completing a book on the literature of friendship in mid-Tang China.

Posted by kanepark at 05:16 PM

Benjamin Ridgway

From River By-Way to River Border: The City of Jiankang in the Wartime Writings of Ye Mengde (1077-1148)

September 29, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Benjamin Ridgway, Assistant Professor of Chinese Language and Literature, Valparaiso University

This presentation explores the way that geographical discourses on dynastic capitals were deployed in political writings and literary works of the Chinese scholar-official elite during the traumatic collapse of the Northern Song (960-1279). Specifically, Professor Ridgway examines the way Ye Mengde's writings on the city of Jiankang (i.e. modern-day Nanjing) reflect the tensions felt by many scholar officials to relocate their “place” in a redefined geo-political order.

Benjamin Ridgway is an Assistant Professor of Chinese Language and Literature in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and MA in Chinese Studies Program at Valparaiso University. He earned his Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Cultures from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His area of specialization is poetry of the Song dynasty (960-1279). More broadly his research interests the intersections between geography, displacement, and literature. His Ph.D. dissertation, “Imagined Travel: Displacement, Landscape, and Literati Identity in the Song Lyrics of Su Shi (1037-1101)” researched the interaction between practices of official travel during the Song dynasty and imagined travel into the historical past in the song lyrics of Su Shi. Recently, he has begun work on a cultural history of the city of Hangzhou during the Southern Song, examining the city’s history through a range of genres, including song lyrics, shi poetry, local gazetteers, strange tales, maps, as well as painting.

Posted by kanepark at 05:12 PM

Dorothy J. Solinger

A Question of Confidence: State Legitimacy and the New Urban Poor

September 22, 2009
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Dorothy J. Solinger
Professor of Political Science, University of California at Irvine

If state benevolence is to serve as a critical condition for Chinese citizens’ acceptance of their government as legitimate, then the concept and practice of official “benevolence” demands some interrogation in today’s China. Does benevolence obtain, and do those who would depend deeply upon it believe in its presence? And, as evidence of such belief, do they entertain an expectation that the state, in its guise as donor, can be counted upon for what for them are vital extensions of its current offerings in the days to come? I target the Minimum Livelihood Guarantee program in Chinese cities and its subjects in order to address this query.

Paradoxically, she will argue, a very prominent element in the relationship between the two is the far more abiding confidence that the recipients appear to place in the powers-that-be than the leaders are willing to lead back to them.

Dorothy J. Solinger is Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Irvine where she has been teaching since 1986. Previously, she taught at the University of Pittsburgh. In academic year 1985-86, she was invited to teach and held a fellowship at the University of Michigan. She is the author of Contesting Citizenship in Urban China (1999), which won the Joseph R. Levenson prize of the Association for Asian Studies for the best book on 20th century China published in 1999. Her forthcoming book, “States’ Gains, Labor’s Losses: China, France and Mexico Choose Global Liaisons, 1980-2000,” will be published by Cornell University Press later this year.

Posted by kanepark at 04:43 PM

December 08, 2008

Yiching Wu

Coping with Crisis in the Wake of the Cultural Revolution: Toward a Historical Critique of China’s Postsocialist Condition

Tuesday, January 20
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Yiching Wu
Postdoctoral Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows and U-M Assistant Professor in Anthropology and History

China’s post-Mao reforms provide a great opportunity to explore a number of important historical, political, and theoretical issues with respect to postsocialist transitions. Focusing on the late 1970s, this talk situates the inaugural moment of China’s liberalizing turn in the context of the organic crisis of the party-state and its ideological apparatus in the wake of the Cultural Revolution. The early post-Mao years of the late 1970s is extremely important, as it was the time when ideological possibilities contrasting sharply from what was to become the new hegemonic formation of the 1980s and 1990s flourished briefly in what was a spontaneous movement of popular activism and criticism, cultural renaissance, and social mobilization. Professor Wu examines the state’s maneuver as tactics of crisis management aiming to contain and neutralize the emergent opposition from below.

Yiching Wu is a postdoctoral fellow in the Michigan Society of Fellows, and Assistant Professor in Anthropology and History at the University of Michigan. An anthropologist trained at the University of Chicago, where he specialized in contemporary Chinese politics and culture, he is interested in popular social movements, class formation and consciousness, socialism and postsocialist transitions, and politics of hegemony and resistance. He is currently working on a book manuscript on the popular transgressions and radicalization within the Chinese Cultural Revolution of the late 1960s.

Posted by batesbe at 10:56 AM

David Porter

Gendered Utopias in Chinese Porcelains and English Women's Writings of the 17th Century

Tuesday, January 27
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

David Porter
U-M Professor of English

This talk will explore a curious and unexpected convergence in the iconography of Chinese transitional ware porcelain and new genres of English women's writing in the 17th century, and will offer reflections on the methodological problems raised by such instances of historical simultaneity.

David Porter is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and a Faculty Associate of the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Ideographia: The Chinese Cipher in Early Modern Europe and a number of articles on the Chinese taste in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England.

Posted by batesbe at 10:55 AM

David R. Knechtges

The Problem with Anthologies: The Case of the Poems of Ying Qu (190-252)

Tuesday, February 3
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

David R. Knechtges
Professor of Literature, University of Washington

The shi poems in the Wen xuan are classified into twenty-three categories. There is one troublesome category designated “Bai yi? 百一, which literally means “one hundred one? or “one of a hundred.? The “Bai yi? category in the Wen xuan contains only one poem by a single poet, Ying Qu 應璩 (190–252). Li Shan ?善 (d. 689) in his commentary to the Wen xuan records four explanations of title “Bai yi? all of which state that Ying Qu’s poems contained veiled criticisms of contemporary affairs. In this paper, I examine the extant fragments of Ying Qu’s poems. I also consider the question of why some sources designate his poems not as “Bai yi,? but xin shi 新詩 or “new poems.? I adduce evidence to show that Ying Qu was considered throughout the Wei, Jin, Nanbeichao period the premier author of poems critical of contemporary affairs, and his poems were called “new? because he was the first poet to use the pentasyllabic form to write a series of critical poems. I also reconsider Ying Qu’s “Bai yi? poem included in the Wen xuan and argue that it may actually contain an implicit criticism of the court.

David R. Knechtges is Professor of Chinese Literature at the University of Washington. He also has taught at Yale, Wisconsin, and Harvard. He is the author of over 100 articles and nine books including Two Studies of the Han Fu (1968), The Han Rhapsody: A Study of the Fu of Yang Hsiung (53 B.C. –A.D.18) (1976), The Han shu Biography of Yang Xiong (1982), Wen-xuan or Selections of Refined Literature. Volume One. Rhapsodies on Metropolises and Capitals 1982), Wen xuan or Selections of Refined Literature. Volume Two. Rhapsodies on Sacrifices, Hunts, Travel, Palaces and Halls, Rivers and Seas (1987), Wen xuan, Volume Three, Rhapsodies on Natural Phenomena, Birds and Animals, Aspirations and Feelings, Sorrowful Laments, Literature, Music and Passions(1996), Editor and co-translator, Gong Kechang. Studies of the Han Fu (1997), Court Culture and Literature in Early China (2002), Co-editor, with Paul Kroll. Studies in Early Medieval Chinese Literature and Cultural History (2003), Co-editor, with Eugene Vance, Rhetoric and the Discourses of Power in Court Culture, East and West, 2005. He is a recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Posted by batesbe at 10:49 AM

Xuefei Ren

Transnational Architectural Production in Urban China

Tuesday, February 10
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Xuefei Ren
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Michigan State University

Professor Xuefei Ren will talk about her forthcoming book "Transnational Architectural Production in Urban China." Based on more than 100 interviews with developers, architects, residents, governmental officials in Beijing and Shanghai between 2004 and 2007, the book explores why China’s urban elites have repeatedly turned to international architects to design their mega projects, and how Beijing and Shanghai have become strategic nodes in the global network of architectural production.

Xuefei Ren is assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Global Urban Studies Program at Michigan State University. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Chicago in 2007. Her research interests include global political economy, politics of urban development, and sociology of space and built environment. She is currently working on a few projects, including (1) heterogeneous Chinese urbanism, (2) urban governance in China and India, (3) the global art market. She has published her work in a number of academic journals, such as City and Community, Journal of Urban Affairs, and Built Environment, and CITY.

Posted by batesbe at 10:48 AM

James Lee

Higher Education and Diversity: The Changing Origins of University Students in China, 1903-2002

Tuesday, February 17
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

James Lee
U-M Professor of History and Sociology

James Lee has five authored or coauthored five books and five edited books published or soon to be published. He is also the co-editor of Historical Methods and the MIT Series in Eurasian Population and Family History. In 2000, he received the Otis Dudley Duncan Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Social Demography and the Social Science History Association Allan Sharlin Award for Best Book in Social Science History. His areas of academic specialization include late imperial and contemporary China; comparative demography and sociology of populations; social-scientific history. Currently, he holds the position of Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Michigan.

Posted by batesbe at 10:46 AM

Sherman Cochran

Chinese Business Dynasty: Family Survival Strategies in War and Revolution

Tuesday, March 3
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Sherman Cochran
Hu Shih Professor of History, Cornell University

How did a Chinese family survive the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-45 and the Communist Revolution of 1949? The strategies of one of China’s most economically dominant and politically influential families, the Lius of Shanghai, are revealed in more than 2,000 letters exchanged by its members: father, mother, nine sons, and three daughters. Their intimate correspondence provides a window on their decision making within their own family and in relation to the wider world of business, national politics, and international affairs.

Sherman Cochran is Hu Shih Professor of Chinese History at Cornell University where he teaches modern Chinese and Asian history. His publications include Cities in Motion: Interior, Coast and Diaspora in Transnational China, co-edited with David Strand (Berkeley, 2007) and Encountering Chinese Networks: Western Japanese, and Chinese Corporations in China, 1880-1937 (Berkeley, 2002). His 2006 publication Chinese Medicine Men: Consumer Culture in China and Southeast Asia (Harvard University Press, 2006) won the 2008 Joseph Levenson Prize of the Association of Asian Studies for the “greatest contribution to increasing understanding of the history, culture, society, politics or economy of China? since 1900.

Posted by batesbe at 10:45 AM

Nicholas Howson

The Shanghai People's Courts -- Competence, Autonomy and Independence

Tuesday, March 10
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Nicholas Howson
Assistant Professor of Law, Michigan Law School

In late 2005, China's Company Law was almost completely re-written, most importantly to provide for a host of new claims which could be brought by private litigants before the Chinese People's Courts. This new "justiability" of China's corporate law presents a very significant challenge to China's developing legal institutions, and their demonstrated technical competence, institutional autonomy and political independence. In the Fall of 2008, Professor Howson analyzed hundreds of corporate law opinions rendered by the Shanghai People's Court system between 1994 and 2008 and interviewed Shanghai judges, judicial officials and academics on the same topic. In this Noon Lecture, he will report his preliminary findings, and explore a contemporary expression of what one historian has called the "paradox of modernity" arising from a prior effort at judicial reform in early 20th century China."

Nicholas C. Howson earned his J.D. from the Columbia Law School in 1988 after graduating from Williams College in 1983 and spending 1983-5 as a graduate fellow at Shanghai's Fudan University. After law school, he was awarded a fellowship to complete research in Qing Dynasty penal law when he was resident at Beijing University for the Fall of 1988. In 1988, Howson joined the New York-based international law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP, where he was elected a partner of the firm, practicing in New York, London, Paris and Beijing. Between 1983 and 2003 he lived for more than a decade in Beijing and Shanghai. Howson writes and lectures widely on Chinese law topics, focusing on Chinese corporate and securities law developments, and has acted as a consultant to the Ford Foundation, the UNDP and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and various Chinese government ministries and administrative departments. He serves often as an expert witness on Chinese law matters in U.S. and international litigations. He is a past chair of the Asian Affairs Committee of the New York Bar Association, on the Board of Advisors for the Columbia Law School, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan Law School in 2005 after teaching at the Columbia, Harvard and Cornell Law Schools.

Posted by batesbe at 10:43 AM

Yi-Li Wu

Gender, Disease, and Visual Culture: Representations of the Female Breast in Late Imperial Chinese Medicine

Tuesday, March 17
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Yi-Li Wu
Associate Professor of History and Chair of International Studies, Albion College

This talk examines how medical images of female breast disease in 18th and 19th century China were shaped by religious and political iconography, Confucian gender norms, and competing medical definitions of the human body.

Yi-Li Wu is Associate Professor of History and Chair of International Studies at Albion College in Albion, Michigan. She holds a B.A. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.A. in International Relations and a Ph.D. in History from Yale University. She is the author of Reproducing Women: Medicine, Metaphor, and Childbirth in Late Imperial China (UC Press, forthcoming). She is currently working on a comparative study of British missionary medicine and Chinese medicine in the mid-19th century.

Posted by batesbe at 10:41 AM

Minyuan Zhao

The 3rd Generation Wireless Technology Standard in China:
A Game Theoretical Perspective

Tuesday, March 24
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Minyuan Zhao
Assistant Professor of Strategy, U-M Ross School of Business

As China considers the next technology standard for its large wireless communications market, the process evolves into a 10-year battle among multinational giants, indigenous firms, and the industry authority. This talk provides a game theoretical perspective on the strategies taken by various parties, and explains why the outcome is not inevitable.

Minyuan Zhao is Assistant Professor of Strategy at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan. She earned her Ph.D. from Stern School of Business, New York University and her master's degree from Fudan University, China. Professor Zhao’s research focuses on firms' innovation strategies, and the interaction between internal organization and external environments in a global context.

Posted by batesbe at 10:40 AM

R. Bin Wong

The Taxing Transformation of the Contemporary Chinese State in Historical and Comparative Perspectives

Tuesday, March 31
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

R. Bin Wong
Director, Asia Institute of the University of California, Los Angeles

This presentation considers the political responses to the challenges of fiscal management as an indicator of state transformation. Public finances figure prominently in accounts of modern European state formation and contemporary concerns for democracy in developing countries. What features of the Chinese state’s major fiscal restructuring since the mid-1990s reflect the fiscal problems and political possibilities of other cases? How can these changes be seen in historical perspective? What might China’s current efforts suggest about future changes within China and are there lessons for other parts of the world?

Wong’s research has examined Chinese patterns of political, economic and social change, especially since eighteenth century, both within Asian regional contexts and compared with more familiar European patterns. Among his books, China Transformed: Historical Change and the Limits of European Experience (Cornell University Press, 1997) also appears in Chinese and a Japanese edition is due out in 2009. Wong has also written or co-authored some fifty articles published in North America, East Asia and Europe, published in Chinese, English, French and Japanese in journals that reach diverse audiences within and beyond academia. His scholarly articles include "Entre monde et nation :Les regions Braudelienne en Asie? in Annales HSS, (56.1 (jan-fev 2001): 5-42); “The Search for European Differences and Domination in the Early Modern World: A View from Asia,? American Historical Review, (107.2 (April 2002): 447-69). More popular essays appear in the Nihon keizai shimbun (Japan Economic Times) the Economic and Political Weekly (Bombay, India). A ten-page interview with Wong appears in the August 2004 issue of Shehui kexue (Social Sciences).

Posted by batesbe at 10:38 AM

Charles Hartman

Soldiers, Money, and History in Song China (960-1279)

Tuesday, April 7
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Charles Hartman
Department of East Asian Studies, The University at Albany

In the conventional understanding of Chinese history, the Song dynasty (960-1279) appears as a period during which civil officials, fortified by a renewal of Confucian values and recruited through an expanded civil service system, inaugurated a period of civilian rule that lead to a domination of literati over military officials in the administration of the dynasty. This view derives ultimately from the official Song History (Songshi) of 1345. My research challenges this assumption by examining the history of the dynasty's financial administration. Preliminary results suggest that Song civil officials fought a losing battle for control of dynastic resources, yet, through their control of the state historiographic function, were able to create an enduring historical image to the contrary.

Professor Charles Hartman obtained his PhD from the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Indiana University in 1975. A member of the Department of East Asian Studies at the University at Albany since 1980, his present research focuses on the history and historiography of the Song dynasty (960-1279).

Posted by batesbe at 10:34 AM

June 12, 2008

Jin Feng

Training Her Body for God or for China: Physical Education at Ginling College

Tuesday, December 2
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Jin Feng
Associate Professor of Chinese, Grinnell College

Ginling College (Jinling nuzi wenii xueyuan) was an all-women's institution founded by female American missionaries in Nanjing, China in the early twentieth-century. Its physical education department generated a kaleidoscope of tales that highlighted complex negotiations of gender, culture, religion, and nationalism at several important junctures of modern Chinese history.

Jin Feng is Associate Professor of Chinese at Grinnell College. She earned her Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Cultures from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is the author of The New Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction (Purdue University Press, 2004), Ginling College: The Making of A Fammily Saga (SUNY Press, forthcoming), and several scholarly articles. She is also the translator of Chen Hengzhe's Early Autogiography (Anhui Education Publications, 2006).

Posted by moyera at 09:48 AM

Wen Yuhang

Singing, Chanting and Acting in Kunqu
Kunqu Performer, Graduate of Beijing Traditional Opera School

Tuesday, November 25
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

As a classical genre of Chinese theatre, kunqu features sophisticated and coordinated performances of elaborate singing, stylized chanting/speaking, and intricate acting/dancing.

To reveal the artistic creativity involved, and the expressions it generates, Mr. Wen Yuhang, an internationally known artist of the genre, will discuss and perform a number of representative arias and monologues, demonstrating kunqu manipulations of words, singing, chanting/speaking, and acting/dancing.

A graduate of the Beijing Traditional Opera School, Mr. Wen specializes in the xiaoshing (young male) role type. Once a principle actor with the Northern Kunqu Company, he recieved "Best Performer" awards in Chinese Drama competitions.

In 1999, he played the leading male role in the Lincoln Center production of Peony Pavilion.

Currently, Mr. Wen resides in New York.

Posted by moyera at 09:11 AM

Mary Gallagher

Legislating Harmony?
Why Chinese Laws are So Good and Implementation So Bad

Tuesday, November 18
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Mary Gallagher
U-M Associate Professor of Political Science

This talk examines the Chinese legislative process and legislative output.

I examine why Chinese laws are increasingly more attentive to important social problems but still likely to fail at the implementation and enforcement stages.

Mary E. Gallagher is an associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan where she is also a faculty associate at the Center for Comparative Political Studies. She is the director of the Center for Chinese Studies. She received her Ph.D. in politics in 2001 from Princeton University. Her book Contagious Capitalism: Globalization and the Politics of Labor in China was published by Princeton Unviersity Press in 2005. She was a Fulbright Research Scholar from 2003 to 2004 at East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai, China where she worked on a new project, The Rule of Law in Chinas: If They Build It, Who Will Come? This project examines the legal mobilization of Chinese workers. It was funded by the Fulbright Association and the National Science Foundation. She has published articles in World Politics, Law and Society Review, Studies in Comparative International Development, and Asian Survey. She teaches classes on Chinese politics, labor rights in the global economy, and research design. She also serves on the University of Michigan's Advisory Committee for labor standards and human rights.

Posted by moyera at 09:09 AM

Mayling Birney

Building the Rule of Law around Democratic Reforms:
Influences on the Enforcement and Defiance of Village Election Laws in China

Tuesday, November 11
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Mayling Birney
Wilson-Cotsen Fellow, Princeton Society of Fellows and Woodrow Wilson School

Using original multi-level survey data from China's two largest provinces, Dr. Birney will show that a key determinant of village election law implementation is the attitude that the higher level government holds towards village self-governance. In contrast, possible bottom-up drivers of election implementation, such as public political engagement, public self-interest in the elections, and social harmony, do not seem to be as significant factors. This finding suggests that when it comes to democracy-enhancing reforms, buiding the rule of law is best done through enlisting top-down support. The assumption that a self-interested, engaged public is able to effectively demand that policitical reforms be implemented, even when they ahve already been passed into laws, may be too optimistic in restrictive authoritarian contexts.

Posted by moyera at 09:05 AM

Yanjie Bian

The Rise of Guanxi in Chinese Transition Economy

Tuesday, November 4
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Yanjie Bian
Professor of Sociology, University of Minnesota

How do we understand the increasing roles that guanxi plays in Chinese transition economy? Sociologist Yanjie Bian proposes a theoretical model in which the role of guanxi is a function of institutional uncertainty and market competition. He tests some empirical implications of this model by analyzing several surveys on job mobility and growth of economic enterprises from 1978 to 2003.

Yanjie Bian is professor of sociology at University of Minnesota, funding director of the Survey Research Center at HKUST, and the PI of the Chinese General Social Survey.

Posted by moyera at 09:00 AM

June 11, 2008

Giovanni Vitiello

Libertine Masculinity: Homosexuality and Homosociality
in Late Imperial Pornographic Fiction

Tuesday, October 28
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Giovanni Vitiello
Associate Professor, Dept. of East Asian Languages and Literatures
University of Hawaii

This presentation focuses on the figure of the male libertine in pornographic fiction to argue that the boundaries of his sexuality and masculinity were drawn and redrawn, and in the process significantly altered, from the mid-seventeenth to the mid-eighteenth centuries. In late Ming erotic narratives we encournter a libertine whose masculinity is centrally realized through sexual penetration (of women and boys alike), and at once predicated upon his own impenetrability. But in a number of early Qing novels that same character can be sexually penetrated without his masculinity being compromised. Later still, in the first half of the eighteenth century, yet a new tendency is detectable, namely a gradual adumbration of the libertine's homoeroticism. These developments, while pointing at a shift in the representation of masculinity and male-male sexuality in fiction, might also signal an attempt to meet the new moral and legal standards of the mid-Qing period.

Professor Vitiello obtained a Laurea in Oriental Languages from the University of Rome, and MA and Ph.D. degrees in Chinese from the University of California at Berkeley. His research and publications focus on late imperial Chinese fiction and the history of sexuality. He has just completed a book manuscript by the title of The Libertine's Friend: Homosexuality and Masculinity in Late Imperial China - 1550-1850. He is currently Associate Professor of Chinese Literature at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa.

Posted by moyera at 04:22 PM

Shuen-fu Lin

A Premonition of the Fall of the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279):
Reading a Song Lyric Composed in 1253 about Reveling on the West Lake

Tuesday, October 14
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Shuen-fu Lin
U-M Professor of Chinese Literature

In this lecture, Professor Shuen-fu Lin will present a close reading of a song lyric (ci) reportedly written by the scholar-official Wen Jiweng (fl 1253-1275) while reveling on the West Lake with fellow scholars on the occasion of their passing the Civil Service Examination for the jinshi (or highest-level) degree.

Wen Jiweng's song lyric will be examined in the context of the mode of life of prosperity, social elegance and graceful leisure of the Southern Song educated elite on the eve of the Mongol conquest of China.

Professor Lin specializes in the literature and culture of premodern China, with special research interests in the poetry and aesthetic theory of the middle periods. He is also interested in early Daoist philosophical literature, the literary dream in poetry and fiction, and garden aesthetics. His books include The Transformation of the Chinese Lyrical Tradition: Chiang K'uei and Southern Sung Tz'u Poetry, The Vitality of the Lyric Voice: Shih Poetry from the Late Han to the T'ang (co-edited with Stephen Owen), and The Tower of Myriad Mirrors: A Supplement to Journey to the West by Tung Yueh (1620-1685) (co-translated with Larry Schulz). He is currently working on a book project on the Inner Chapters of the early Daoist classsic text Zhuangzi.

Posted by moyera at 03:55 PM

Joseph Dennis

Local Gazetteers in Ming Dynasty Borderlands

Tuesday, October 7
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Joseph Dennis
Assistant Professor of History, Davidson College, North Carolina

This lecture will explore the compilation, publication, and circulation of local gazetteers in Ming dynasty borderlands. The focus will be on gazetteers compiled by native officials in native domains (tusi土?) and the role of local gazetteers in building literary culture along the southwestern border.

Professor Dennis' research is on Chinese social, legal, and cultural history. He is currently writing a book, Writing, Publishing and Reading Local Histories in China, 1100-1644. His courses include surveys of East Asian History, upper division courses on imperial and modern China, and seminars on Chinese legal history and the history of the book.

Posted by moyera at 03:41 PM

Madeline Chu

The Three Kingdoms Heroes Re-Viewed

Tuesday, September 30
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Madeline Chu
Professor of Chinese Language and Literature, Kalamazoo College


In the Mao Zonggang Edition of the Sanguo Yanyi, many Tang and Song poems were quoted to provide comments of the gallant deeds of the heroes in the novel. It is interesting to see how very different a tone was adopted by Mao's contemporaries in their poetic comments of the same heroes. The talk will present some preliminary findings in this respect.

Posted by moyera at 03:35 PM

Teemu Ruskola

China, for Example

Tuesday, September 23
Tuesday 12 noon to 1:00 pm
Room 1636 School of Social Work Building
1080 South University

Teemu Ruskola
Professor Law, Emory Law School

International law is a foundational element in the political ontology of the modern world. However, studies of international law approach it almost exclusively from the vantage point of Europe, with China figuring only minimally - often merely as an illustration of a larger point or a counter-example of a general principle.

In these conditions, what would it mean to analyze international law from the point of view of China, and what does its history in China mean for our understanding of international law as a transnational cultural form today? From an even more fundamental perspective, why is China always only an example, merely an instance of the particular? Is a history of China's place in the making of modern international law also only an illustration of something larger than China itself? To begin to answer these questions, this presentation will approach international law as a political and epistemological project, with deeply embedded notions of space, time, and politics.

Teemu Ruskola is Professor of Law at Emory University. Upon graduating from Yale Law School, Ruskola practised law as an associate at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, in the firm's New York and Hong Kong offices. Thereafter, he studies East Asian Studies at Stanford University. Prior to joining the Emory Law School faculty in 2007, Ruskola was Professor of Law at American University in Washington, D.C. He has been a visiting professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and at Cornell Law School, and served as a sabbatical visitor at Columbia Law School. During the academic year 2008-09, he is a member of the Insititute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, NJ.

Professor Ruskola's scholarhsip addresses questions of legal theory from multiple perspectives, frequently with China as a vantage point. His publications - apearing in the American Quarterly, Social Text, Michigan Law Review, Standford Law Review, and the Yale Law Journal, among other places - explore the intersection of corporate and family law in China, "legal Orientalism," and the history and politics of Euro-American conceptions of sovereignty in the Asia-Pacific.

Posted by moyera at 03:19 PM