April 22, 2014

Bright Sheng's recent TED talk


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Humorous, insightful, and inspirational - this one is a keeper.

Bright Sheng is Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition and CCS faculty associate.

Posted by zzhu at 11:26 AM

April 18, 2014

CCS faculty associate develops Tang poetry app, wins award


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A Chinese poetry app designed by David Porter, Professor of Comparative Literature, Professor of English, and CCS faculty associate, has won a prize for best app in the Teaching and Learning category of the 2014 Mobile Apps Challenge, an annual UM app development competition sponsored by Computer Science and Engineering, Information and Technology Services, the Office of Technology Transfer, and Apple. David's app helps students of Chinese learn to read, write, translate, and recite a selection of poems from the Tang Dynasty. It is available for free download from the iTunes App Store and Google Play.

Video demo:

Posted by zzhu at 03:00 PM

March 26, 2014

CCS is proud to fund donation of landmark Buddhist dictionary


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March 12, 2014
Contact: Maryanne George, (734) 615-6514, mageorge[at]umich[dot]edu

Landmark Buddhist dictionary will be donated to Michigan’s high schools, community colleges and public libraries

ANN ARBOR─ University of Michigan professor Donald Lopez spent the past twelve years compiling the most authoritative and wide-ranging reference on Buddhism ever produced in English.

Since the publication of “The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism” last November, Lopez has raised $40,000 to make the book available free of charge to all community colleges, public high schools, and public libraries in Michigan. Approximately 1,000 copies will be distributed for the students and citizens of the state.

With more than 5,000 alphabetical entries totaling over one million words, “The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism” explains the key terms, doctrines, practices, texts, authors, deities, and schools of Buddhism across all of the six major canonical languages and traditions: Sanskrit, Pali, Tibetan, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. It also includes selected terms from Burmese, Khmer, Lao, Mongolian, Newar, Sinhalese, Thai, and Vietnamese. At over one million words and with over five thousand entries, it is the largest and most comprehensive dictionary of Buddhism ever published in a European language.

Lopez is the Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies and chair of the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures in U-M’s College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. He co-authored the dictionary with Robert Buswell, Distinguished Professor of Buddhist Studies and director of the Center for Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

“Buddhism is one of the great religions of the world, with a vast geographical and chronological expanse,” Lopez says. “It is also generating great interest in the United States. Robert Buswell and I wanted to produce a book that provided as much information about Buddhism as we could within the covers of a single book.”

Support for the distribution program is being provided by the Office of the President, the Dean of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, the Dean of the Rackham School of Graduate Studies, the International Institute, the Nam Center for Korean Studies, the Center for Chinese Studies, the Center for Japanese Studies, and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies.

“As a faculty member at this great public university I feel a responsibility to offer the results of our scholarship to the people of the state of Michigan,” Lopez says. “I am grateful to the offices and centers on campus who generously agreed to support this program.”

Librarians at Michigan community colleges, public high schools, and public libraries may order a copy by sending their name, mailing address, and phone number to the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures (ALC) at alc-buddhism[at]umich[dot]edu.

For more information:
The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism: http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10099.html

Posted by zzhu at 03:19 PM

February 10, 2014

Recent media contributions by CCS alumni - updated February 2014


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************************************************
David Caragliano (JD/CCS MA '09)
Lawyer and international development professional

K-Pop, Cat GIFs, and Constitutionalism
Foreign Policy
02/11/2014

************************************************
Elizabeth C. Economy (PhD '94, Political Science)
C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies
Council on Foreign Relations

Q&A: China Growing 'By All Means Necessary'
Voice of America
02/06/2014

************************************************
Damien Ma (MA '06)
Fellow, Paulson Institute

China's 21st century challenge: Define your narrative or fall behind
Why Economic Change Could Come Sooner Than You Think
by Damien Ma, Special to CNN
01/23/2014

If You Think China’s Air Is Bad...
by Damien Ma and William Adams
The New York Times
11/07/2013

Posted by zzhu at 05:54 AM

February 09, 2014

CCS Faculty Associates in the News - updated February 2014


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(In alphabetical order by faculty last name.)


Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science

Facing slowdown, China vows to let market play more important role in economy
by Simon Denyer, The Washington Post
11/12/2013


Has China Failed Key Test?

by Elizabeth Redden, Inside Higher Ed
10/21/2013

A compilation of all of Mary Gallagher's comments on Chinese labor politics



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Caveat on Shanghai experiment
by Joanna Chiu and George Chen, South China Morning Post
11/25/2013



Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business

What's behind the turmoil in emerging markets?
by Linda Lim And John Stuermer
02/09/2014

Tracing Confucius' bloodline in Singapore
by Linda Lim
02/08/2014



Donald Lopez
A.E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist Studies; Department Chair
Department of Asian Languages and Cultures
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

Buddhism's growing place in our culture
Stateside with Cynthia Canty
11/19/2013

10 Misconceptions about Buddhism
by Robert E. Buswell, Jr. and Donald S. Lopez, Jr., tricycle.com
11/18/2013


U-M professor co-authors landmark dictionary about Buddhism

by Maryanne George, The University Record
11/05/2013



Bright Sheng
Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition
U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

DSO, Gil Shaham debut violin concerto by composer Bright Sheng
by Chris Felcyn, The Detroit News
10/02/2013



Emily Wilcox
Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Studies
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

走出教室,认识真实的中国
纽约时报中文网,六木撰稿
10/21/2013

Posted by zzhu at 02:05 PM

January 30, 2014

Happy Chinese New Year from the University of Michigan


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恭賀新禧 龍馬精神

密歇根大學祝您新春愉快,甲午年平安吉祥,馬到功成!

All of us at the University of Michigan wish you a Happy Lunar New Year. May you have a wonderful Year of the Horse filled with peace and prosperity!

(圖片為彩绘鞍辔陶马,唐代初期,密歇根大學美術館藏)

Posted by zzhu at 11:27 AM

December 12, 2013

The best of Fall 2013!


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CCS/UM-China in the spotlight:

1. A critical gift at a critical time: Read all about Rich and Susan Rogel's US$10-million gift to CCS here, including Chinese media coverage.

2. CCS faculty associates are highly sought after for their expertise on China's past and present. CCS director Mary Gallagher comments on the key messages of the communique released after the Third Plenum of the 18th Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party. Emily Wilcox's teaching methods are featured in a piece for the Chinese-language edition of the New York Times. Nicholas Howson analyzes the legal risks and uncertainty of the Shanghai Free-trade Zone. And having just published a groundbreaking dictionary of Buddhism, Donald Lopez and his co-author take up the 10 Misconceptions about Buddhism. And much more!

3. CCS graduate student affiliate Michael Opper and faculty associates Benjamin Brose and San Duanmu receive prestigious Fulbright grants to further their respective research on China.

4. We invite you to like the Center for Chinese Studies on Facebook.

A fond look back at just a few events this term:

5.Tuesday, December 3 - A large crowd helped us welcome back alumnus Damien Ma (MA '06), who discussed his new book In Line Behind a Billion People: How Scarcity Will Define China's Ascent. A reception and book-signing followed.

6. All eyes on Chinese independent films! On Saturday, November 16, the CCS Chinese Documentary Film Series presented Qiu Jiongjiong (邱炯炯)'s "My Mother's Rhapsody (萱堂闲话录)." Watch the trailer here. Two days after that, on Monday, November 18, CCS brought the action to the historic Michigan Theater, where a screening of "Stratum 1: The Visitors (地层1:来客)" took place following a reception in honor of the director of the film. And the next day, Tuesday, November 19: the Fall 2013 CCS Noon Lecture Series offered up even more ruminations on independent film in China.

7. On Friday and Saturday, October 25 and 26, many enthusiastic scholars and students participated in the CCS Annual Conference, the theme of which was "Socialist Culture in China Reconsidered."

'Tis the season for even more opportunities!

8. What's left of December 2013: Reading Communities and the Circulation of Print: Australia, China, and Britain in the 19th century - proposals are due December 15; Postdoctoral Fellowship in Silk Road Studies at Georgetown University - applications are due December 31.

9. January 2014: Asian Studies Graduate Student Conference at University of Hawaii at Manoa - papers are accepted through January 8; The Zeitgeists of Taiwan: Looking Back, Moving Forward - individual paper and panel proposal submissions are accepted through January 10; Association for Asian Performance (AAP) emerging scholars panel - deadline for submissions is January 15; UBC/UW Graduate Student Conference on Changing Vistas: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Asia Pacific - abstracts must be received by January 15.

10. Skipping to March 2014: A panel on ecology and landscape in Asian literature and film at the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Convention - proposals are accepted by March 1; Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast 2013 Conference - submission deadline is March 15.

Posted by zzhu at 11:00 PM

December 05, 2013

New Project on "Spatial Study of Chinese Religions and Society"

December 4, 2013

The Center on Religion and Chinese Society at Purdue University (http://www.purdue.edu/crcs) and the China Data Center at the University of Michigan (http://chinadatacenter.org) are pleased to announce the project “Spatial Study of Chinese Religions and Society" supported by a three-year, $400,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

The project is an extension of a project on the spatial study of Chinese Christianity, which was supported by a prior Luce Foundation grant of $300,000 from 2011 to 2014. The new project will expand the current research on Chinese Christianity to the study of Buddhism, Islam, and Taoism in mainland China.

The project will 1) develop the global research and data collaboration on the study of Chinese religions; 2) provide effective spatial information technology in support of interested global users; 3) promote empirical, qualitative, and quantitative research on Chinese religions; 4) enhance Americans’ knowledge and understanding of Chinese religious studies; 5) educate the general public about Chinese religions; and 6) explore and facilitate international research, teaching, learning, and training collaborations on the social scientific study of religions.

Specifically, the project will 1) complete, validate, and enter spatial data on Protestant, Catholic, Buddhist, Islamic and Taoist sites into an online system; 2) develop an online spatial information explorer which will be accessible to the public, useful to professionals, and valuable to academics teaching about Chinese religions; 3) conduct theory-driven and empirical studies using the spatial data and online system; and 4) use these studies as exemplars for the training of professionals and researchers.

The project is directed by Dr. Z. George Hong (Professor of History at Purdue University Calumet and Co-Director of the Center on Religion and Chinese Society at Purdue University), Dr. Fenggang Yang (Professor of Sociology, Director of the Center on Religion and Chinese Society at Purdue University and President-elect of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, 2013-2016), and Dr. Shuming Bao (Director of the China Data Center at the University of Michigan).

For more details, please visit http://religioninchina.org/default.aspx or contact director[at]ReligionInChina[dot]org.

Posted by zzhu at 07:04 AM

November 27, 2013

CCS Faculty Associates in the News - updated November 2013


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(In alphabetical order by faculty last name.)


Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science

Facing slowdown, China vows to let market play more important role in economy
by Simon Denyer, The Washington Post
11/12/2013


Has China Failed Key Test?

by Elizabeth Redden, Inside Higher Ed
10/21/2013


Bo trial shows obedience is Beijing's goal: analysts

by Neil Connor, Agence France-Presse
09/23/2013

A compilation of all of Mary Gallagher's comments on Chinese labor politics



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Caveat on Shanghai experiment
by Joanna Chiu and George Chen, South China Morning Post
11/25/2013

Bo trial combines old and new in Chinese law: analysts
by Kelly Olsen, Agence France-Presse
08/24/2013



Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business


Snyder to address Detroit bankruptcy concerns during Asia trade mission

by Bryce G. Hoffman, The Detroit News
09/03/2013



Donald Lopez
A.E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist Studies; Department Chair
Department of Asian Languages and Cultures
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

Buddhism's growing place in our culture
Stateside with Cynthia Canty
11/19/2013

10 Misconceptions about Buddhism
by Robert E. Buswell, Jr. and Donald S. Lopez, Jr., tricycle.com
11/18/2013


U-M professor co-authors landmark dictionary about Buddhism

by Maryanne George, The University Record
11/05/2013



Bright Sheng
Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition
U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

DSO, Gil Shaham debut violin concerto by composer Bright Sheng
by Chris Felcyn, The Detroit News
10/02/2013

Detroit Lures Lang Lang For Concert, Webcast
by Jeff Karoub, The Associated Press
09/06/2013



Emily Wilcox
Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Studies
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

走出教室,认识真实的中国
纽约时报中文网,六木撰稿
10/21/2013



Yu Xie
Otis Dudley Duncan Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Statistics
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

New Survey Finds China Unequal, Unemployed and Untrusting
by Tom Orlik and Sophia Cheng, The Wall Street Journal
07/26/2013

Posted by zzhu at 12:41 AM

November 07, 2013

Rogels’ $50M gift to shape medical education, Chinese studies


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With $50M gift to U-M, Richard and Susan Rogel shape the future of medical education & Chinese studies

Chinese media coverage:
U. Michigan gets grant for China center
by Yu Wei, China Daily
11/07/2013

密大中國研究中心 獲千萬捐款
記者黃惠玲, 世界新聞網
11/07/2013

Posted by zzhu at 10:31 PM

October 30, 2013

CCS student and faculty receive Fulbright grants


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CCS is very well represented among U-M Fulbright grantees in the 2013-2014 academic year. Congratulations to all the recipients of these prestigious awards!

CCS affiliated:


Michael Opper, Ph.D., LSA (Linguistics); China; Searching for General Linguistic Principles through the Minority Languages of China.


Benjamin Brose, Assistant Professor, Asian Languages & Cultures, LSA. “Theology/Religion”; Research: Xuanzang’s Skull: Buddhism, Nationalism, and Diplomacy in Modern Asia; Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; September 2013 – May 2014.


San Duanmu, Professor, Department of Linguistics, LSA. “Linguistics”; Research: Building a Chinese Sound Inventory Database; Peking University, Beijing, China; May 2014 – August 2014.

Other U-M scholars headed to China or Taiwan on the Fulbright:
Stephanie Chen, B.S., LSA (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology); China; Nutritional Ecology of Golden Snub-Nosed Monkeys.
Josephine Kao, M.F.A., School of Music, Theatre, and Dance (Dance); Taiwan; The Body as Instrument: Looking and Listening to Ethnicity and Identity.
Lydia McMullen-Laird, B.A., Ford School of Public Policy (Public Policy); China; Exploring Chinese-Russian Relations in Northeastern China.

Posted by zzhu at 05:28 PM

CCS Faculty Associates in the News - updated October 2013


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Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science


Has China Failed Key Test?

by Elizabeth Redden, Inside Higher Ed
10/21/2013


Bo trial shows obedience is Beijing's goal: analysts

by Neil Connor, Agence France-Presse
09/23/2013


Academic Ties With China Face New Scrutiny in Dispute Over Dissident

by Karin Fischer, The Chronicle of Higher Education
06/18/2013


China setting up first university campuses abroad

by Didi Tang, The Associated Press
06/11/2013

Even after earlier fire, China poultry plant workers didn't query locked doors
by Koh Gui Qing, Reuters
06/05/2013

A compilation of all of Mary Gallagher's comments on Chinese labor politics



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Bo trial combines old and new in Chinese law: analysts
by Kelly Olsen, Agence France-Presse
08/24/2013



Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business


Snyder to address Detroit bankruptcy concerns during Asia trade mission

by Bryce G. Hoffman, The Detroit News
09/03/2013



Bright Sheng
Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition
U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

DSO, Gil Shaham debut violin concerto by composer Bright Sheng
by Chris Felcyn, The Detroit News
10/02/2013

Detroit Lures Lang Lang For Concert, Webcast
by Jeff Karoub, The Associated Press
09/06/2013



Emily Wilcox
Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Studies
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

走出教室,认识真实的中国
纽约时报中文网,六木撰稿
10/21/2013



Yu Xie
Otis Dudley Duncan Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Statistics
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

New Survey Finds China Unequal, Unemployed and Untrusting
by Tom Orlik and Sophia Cheng, The Wall Street Journal
07/26/2013

Posted by zzhu at 02:23 AM

September 30, 2013

CCS faculty associates and alumni comment on the Bo Xilai trial


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Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science


Bo trial shows obedience is Beijing's goal: analysts

by Neil Connor, Agence France-Presse
09/23/2013



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Bo trial combines old and new in Chinese law: analysts
by Kelly Olsen, Agence France-Presse
08/24/2013



David Shambaugh (PhD '89, political science)
Professor of Political Science and International Affairs
George Washington University

China seeks to erase Bo Xilai influence
by Jamil Anderlini, The Financial Times
09/23/2013



Yuhua Wang (PhD '11, political science)
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of Pennsylvania

What we learned from Bo Xilai trial

Posted by zzhu at 05:31 PM

September 19, 2013

CCS Faculty Associates in the News - updated September 2013


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Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science


Bo trial shows obedience is Beijing's goal: analysts

by Neil Connor, Agence France-Presse
09/23/2013


Academic Ties With China Face New Scrutiny in Dispute Over Dissident

by Karin Fischer, The Chronicle of Higher Education
06/18/2013


China setting up first university campuses abroad

by Didi Tang, The Associated Press
06/11/2013

Even after earlier fire, China poultry plant workers didn't query locked doors
by Koh Gui Qing, Reuters
06/05/2013

A compilation of all of Mary Gallagher's comments on Chinese labor politics



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Bo trial combines old and new in Chinese law: analysts
by Kelly Olsen, Agence France-Presse
08/24/2013



Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business


Snyder to address Detroit bankruptcy concerns during Asia trade mission

by Bryce G. Hoffman, The Detroit News
09/03/2013



Bright Sheng
Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition
U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Detroit Lures Lang Lang For Concert, Webcast
by Jeff Karoub, The Associated Press
09/06/2013



Yu Xie
Otis Dudley Duncan Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Statistics
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

New Survey Finds China Unequal, Unemployed and Untrusting
by Tom Orlik and Sophia Cheng, The Wall Street Journal
07/26/2013

Posted by zzhu at 08:09 PM

August 20, 2013

A roundup of public comments/statements made by CCS Director Mary Gallagher on Chinese labor politics - updated August 2013


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Even after earlier fire, China poultry plant workers didn't query locked doors
by Koh Gui Qing, Reuters
06/05/2013

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs
by Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
01/24/2013

Foxconn riot in China seen as likely to recur
by William Wan, The Washington Post
04/28/2012

Congressional-Executive Commission on China
hearing on "Working Conditions and Worker Rights in China: Recent Developments"

Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2200
07/31/2012
Watch Professor Gallagher's testimony and/or download the MP3 recording of the proceedings here.

Listen to the proceedings and download presentations (including Mary Gallagher's) at
"Evolution of China’s Governance: Chinese and American Perspectives,"
an event hosted by John L. Thornton China Center, The Brookings Institution
05/09/2011

China's trade union takes up a new cause — workers
by Andrew Higgins, The Washington Post
04/28/2011

Willful Ignorance: How Apple And Other Electronics Giants Gain the Benefits of Chinese Labor
by Yepoka Yeebo, The Huffington Post
02/24/2011

China in 2010: A 13-Link Retrospective
by Jeffrey Wasserstrom, The Huffington Post
01/05/2011

Chinese Workers’ Rising Rights-Consciousness
by Stanley Lubman, The Wall Street Journal Digital Network
10/20/2010

Chinese Workers Ramp Up Demand for Better Wages
by Jamila Trindle, AOL News
08/15/2010

The Labor Movement in China
Focus: Interviews on global affairs and daily life
WILL-AM 580 - Illinois Public Media
08/03/2010

A University of Michigan Podcast: Worker strikes in China could drive up prices for goods

China costs are great wall for fashion firms
by Adrianne Pasquarelli, Crain's New York Business
07/16/2010

Honda Workers Bypass 'Toothless' China Unions, Fueling Strikes
by Liza Lin and Stephanie Wong, Bloomberg
06/30/2010

As China Aids Labor, Unrest Is Still Rising
by Edward Wong, The New York Times
06/20/2010

Room for Debate: What Do China's Workers Want?
The New York Times
06/13/2010

Chinese Workers Challenge Beijing's Authority
by Norihiko Shirouzu, The Wall Street Journal
06/13/2010

Why is the Chinese government allowing workers to strike?
by Katherine Ryder, Fortune Magazine (via CNN Money)
06/10/2010

As China’s Wages Rise, Export Prices Could Follow
by David Barboza, The New York Times
06/07/2010

Labor unrest in China reflects changing demographics, more awareness of rights
by Keith Richburg, The Washington Post
06/07/2010

Posted by zzhu at 03:13 PM

August 03, 2013

A roundup of recent comments by CCS Director Mary Gallagher on Chinese labor politics


Bookmark and Share

Even after earlier fire, China poultry plant workers didn't query locked doors
by Koh Gui Qing, Reuters
06/05/2013

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs
by Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
01/24/2013

Foxconn riot in China seen as likely to recur
by William Wan, The Washington Post
04/28/2012

Congressional-Executive Commission on China
hearing on "Working Conditions and Worker Rights in China: Recent Developments"

Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2200
07/31/2012
Watch Professor Gallagher's testimony and/or download the MP3 recording of the proceedings here.

Listen to the proceedings and download presentations (including Mary Gallagher's) at
"Evolution of China’s Governance: Chinese and American Perspectives,"
an event hosted by John L. Thornton China Center, The Brookings Institution
05/09/2011

China's trade union takes up a new cause — workers
by Andrew Higgins, The Washington Post
04/28/2011

Willful Ignorance: How Apple And Other Electronics Giants Gain the Benefits of Chinese Labor
by Yepoka Yeebo, The Huffington Post
02/24/2011

China in 2010: A 13-Link Retrospective
by Jeffrey Wasserstrom, The Huffington Post
01/05/2011

Chinese Workers’ Rising Rights-Consciousness
by Stanley Lubman, The Wall Street Journal Digital Network
10/20/2010

Chinese Workers Ramp Up Demand for Better Wages
by Jamila Trindle, AOL News
08/15/2010

The Labor Movement in China
Focus: Interviews on global affairs and daily life
WILL-AM 580 - Illinois Public Media
08/03/2010

A University of Michigan Podcast: Worker strikes in China could drive up prices for goods

China costs are great wall for fashion firms
by Adrianne Pasquarelli, Crain's New York Business
07/16/2010

Honda Workers Bypass 'Toothless' China Unions, Fueling Strikes
by Liza Lin and Stephanie Wong, Bloomberg
06/30/2010

As China Aids Labor, Unrest Is Still Rising
by Edward Wong, The New York Times
06/20/2010

Room for Debate: What Do China's Workers Want?
The New York Times
06/13/2010

Chinese Workers Challenge Beijing's Authority
by Norihiko Shirouzu, The Wall Street Journal
06/13/2010

Why is the Chinese government allowing workers to strike?
by Katherine Ryder, Fortune Magazine (via CNN Money)
06/10/2010

As China’s Wages Rise, Export Prices Could Follow
by David Barboza, The New York Times
06/07/2010

Labor unrest in China reflects changing demographics, more awareness of rights
by Keith Richburg, The Washington Post
06/07/2010

Posted by zzhu at 05:21 AM

April 26, 2013

CCS Faculty Associates in the News - updated April 2013


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Brian Wu
Assistant Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business


China's economy: Perverse advantage

The Economist
04/27/2013


Doing business in China: Being efficient isn't enough

William Foreman, Global Michigan
04/09/2013



Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business


How land and people fit in Singapore’s economy

Yahoo! Singapore
02/21/2013


New Chinese President Faces Looming Economic Decisions

News & Media, U-M Ross School of Business
12/12/2012



Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs
Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
01/24/2013

A roundup of all of Mary Gallagher's recent comments on Chinese labor politics



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Family of Chinese Regulator Profits in Insurance Firm’s Rise
by David Barboza, The New York Times
12/30/2012


Capital City Recap with Michael Cohen - a discussion of leadership selection at China's 18th Party Congress

11/14/2012

A murder and confession leave questions in China
by Gillian Wong, The Associated Press
08/14/2012



Bright Sheng
Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition
U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Bright's country
by Kelly Chung Dawson, The China Daily
11/09/2012



Xiaobing Tang
Professor of Comparative Literature, Helmut F. Stern Professor of Modern Chinese Studies
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

China Celebrates Author Mo Yan’s Nobel
by Austin Ramzy, Time Magazine
10/11/2012



Yu Xie
Otis Dudley Duncan Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Statistics
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

How Asians displaced Hispanics as biggest group of new US immigrants
by Mark Guarino, The Christian Science Monitor
06/19/2012

Posted by zzhu at 04:05 PM

April 19, 2013

The best of Winter 2013!


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CCS/UM-China in the spotlight:

1. We are at 928 now, but it was exciting to reach the symbolic milestone of 888 posts of the CCS blog. We also invite you to like the Center for Chinese Studies on Facebook.

2. The University of Michigan is recognized for its growing presence on Sina Weibo (新浪微博), the popular Chinese social networking Web site. The University also celebrated the beginning of the Year of Snake with an official greeting.

3. Hot off the (virtual) presses - CCS alumni's writing on key issues of Chinese society! Damien Ma (CCS MA '06) and colleague offer up a meticulous assessment of the prospect for reform. David Shambaugh (PhD ’89) joins the discussion on "Why Chinese soft power is such a hard sell." And David Caragliano (JD/CCS MA '09) explains "Why China's 'real name' Internet policy doesn't work."

4. CCS faculty associates are trusted voices on contemporary China. Xun (Brian) Wu is featured on Global Michigan for his research finding that efficiency and innovation are not enough for business success in China, which he also presented in his April 2, 2013 CCS Noon Lecture entitled "Institutional Barriers and Industry Dynamics." CCS director and professor of political science Mary Gallagher gives her take on why Chinese graduates are turning down factory jobs. And Nicholas Howson, Professor of Law, discusses allegations surrounding highly profitable transactions made by relatives of a top Chinese insurance regulator


We love our collaborators!

5. CCS center associate Yi-Li Wu shares her lovely, insightful observations from the Association for Asian Studies annual meeting.

6. We once again have the pleasure of showcasing savvy writing on China from Asia Healthcare Blog, this time addressing questions such as what is "Chinese" about a Chinese hospital and how socioeconomic status affects health in China.


Many more opportunities still up for grabs!

7. The Congressional-Executive Commission on China is looking to hire a professional staff member in the area of commercial rule of law. Application deadline is April 22, 2013.

8. Call for Papers: The Eighth Annual Conference of the Consortium for Western China Development Studies - abstracts are accepted through April 30.

9. Victoria Cruises Inc. seeks to hire a Yangtze River cruise director.

10. Application to attend the Forum for American/Chinese Exchange at Stanford University is now available online; applications can be submitted through May 1.


THANK YOU!

Posted by zzhu at 11:28 AM

April 18, 2013

Recent media contributions by CCS alumni - updated April 2013


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************************************************
Damien Ma (MA '06)
Fellow, Paulson Institute

The Rise of China's Reformers?
Why Economic Change Could Come Sooner Than You Think
by Evan A. Feigenbaum and Damien Ma
Foreign Affairs
04/17/2013

On China's political transition, October 2012

Damien Ma's other articles on China
in The Atlantic


************************************************
David Caragliano (JD/CCS MA '09)
Lawyer and international development professional

Why China's 'Real Name' Internet Policy Doesn't Work
The Atlantic
03/26/2013

China to Web Users: Great Firewall? Just Be Glad We're Not North Korea
The Atlantic
01/14/2013

Is China Really the 80th-Most-Corrupt Country on Earth?
The Atlantic
12/12/2012


************************************************
David Shambaugh (PhD '89, Political Science)
Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

David Shambaugh's response to the question "Why Is Chinese Soft Power Such a Hard Sell?"
A ChinaFile conversation
April 11, 2013

David Shambaugh Assesses China, the "Partial Power," at Asia Society, February 27, 2013

Posted by zzhu at 04:38 PM

March 07, 2013

CCS Faculty Associates in the News - updated March 2013


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Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business


How land and people fit in Singapore’s economy

Yahoo! Singapore
02/21/2013


New Chinese President Faces Looming Economic Decisions

News & Media, U-M Ross School of Business
12/12/2012



Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs
Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
01/24/2013

Communist Party holds key to prosperity in China
The Toledo Blade
02/19/2012

Room for Debate: How Can U.S. Scholars Resist China's Control?
The New York Times
09/01/2011

A roundup of all of Mary Gallagher's recent comments on Chinese labor politics



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Family of Chinese Regulator Profits in Insurance Firm’s Rise
by David Barboza, The New York Times
12/30/2012


Capital City Recap with Michael Cohen - a discussion of leadership selection at China's 18th Party Congress

11/14/2012

A murder and confession leave questions in China
by Gillian Wong, The Associated Press
08/14/2012

Bo Suspended After Wife Suspected in British Man’s Murder
Bloomberg News
04/11/2012



Robert Adams
Assistant Professor of Architecture

Disability rights influence architecture professor
The University Record
04/02/2012



Donald Lopez
Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor and Department Chair
Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, U-M College of Literature, Science and the Arts

A Tale of Two Scriptures: The American Book of Mormon and the Tibetan Book of the Dead
The Huffington Post
01/31/2012



Bright Sheng
Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition
U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Bright's country
by Kelly Chung Dawson, The China Daily
11/09/2012



Xiaobing Tang
Professor of Comparative Literature, Helmut F. Stern Professor of Modern Chinese Studies
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

China Celebrates Author Mo Yan’s Nobel
by Austin Ramzy, Time Magazine
10/11/2012



Yu Xie
Otis Dudley Duncan Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Statistics
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts
How Asians displaced Hispanics as biggest group of new US immigrants
by Mark Guarino, The Christian Science Monitor
06/19/2012

Posted by zzhu at 11:42 PM

February 18, 2013

Lucky number 888!


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We reached the milestone of 888 blog posts today! But of course, we've added a few more since then.

Thank you for reading!

Posted by zzhu at 11:29 PM

February 17, 2013

Updated February 2013: Recent media contributions by CCS alumni


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************************************************
David Caragliano (JD/CCS MA '09)
Lawyer and international development professional

China to Web Users: Great Firewall? Just Be Glad We're Not North Korea
The Atlantic
01/14/2013

Is China Really the 80th-Most-Corrupt Country on Earth?
The Atlantic
12/12/2012

What’s Really Behind China’s Tabloid-Style Coverage of Obama’s Asia Trip
Tea Leaf Nation
11/21/2012

China's Transparency Reform: Is It for Real?
The Atlantic
11/06/2012


************************************************
David Shambaugh (PhD '89, Political Science)
Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

David Shambaugh discusses his latest edited volume Tangled Titans:


Ten Questions for China’s Heir Presumptive
The New York Times
02/10/2012


************************************************
Damien Ma (MA '06)
China Analyst, Eurasia Group

On China's political transition, October 2012


Damien appeared on Charlie Rose Wednesday, March 15, 2012 to discussed Bo Xilai's ouster, the biggest political story coming out of China in recent years.


Damien Ma's other articles on China
in The Atlantic


************************************************
Michael Dunne (MA/MBA '90)
President, Dunne & Company

Need to learn Punjabi, Swahili or dozens of other languages? U-M is the place
The University of Michigan Record
03/12/2012


American Wheels, Chinese Roads
LSA Today
01/24/2012


************************************************
Elizabeth C. Economy (PhD '94, Political Science)
C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies
Council on Foreign Relations

CFR's Economy Says China Still Vibrant
03/19/2012


China's Land Grab Epidemic Is Causing More Wukan-Style Protests
The Atlantic
02/08/2012


Elizabeth Economy's other articles on China
in The Atlantic

Posted by zzhu at 09:39 PM

February 06, 2013

Happy lunar new year from the University of Michigan! 密歇根大学与您共庆新年!


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Posted by zzhu at 11:52 AM

January 29, 2013

U-M presence growing on Sina Weibo (新浪微博), popular Chinese social networking Web site


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Higher Education is Using Sina Weibo to Engage and Promote
Eric Stoller, Inside Higher Ed
01/27/2013

Click on the image below to follow the University of Michigan on Weibo!

Posted by zzhu at 03:23 PM

January 28, 2013

CCS Faculty Associates in the News


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Mary Gallagher
CCS Director
Associate Professor of Political Science

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs
Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
01/24/2013

Communist Party holds key to prosperity in China
The Toledo Blade
02/19/2012

Room for Debate: How Can U.S. Scholars Resist China's Control?
The New York Times
09/01/2011

A roundup of all of Mary Gallagher's recent comments on Chinese labor politics



Nico Howson
Professor of Law
U-M Law School

Family of Chinese Regulator Profits in Insurance Firm’s Rise
by David Barboza, The New York Times
12/30/2012


Capital City Recap with Michael Cohen - a discussion of leadership selection at China's 18th Party Congress

11/14/2012

A murder and confession leave questions in China
by Gillian Wong, The Associated Press
08/14/2012

Bo Suspended After Wife Suspected in British Man’s Murder
Bloomberg News
04/11/2012

US Court Fight May Not Solve Chinese Accounting Mess
CNBC - online
09/13/2011

中国高院: 政府拒绝信息公开,民可告官
记者: 吴心欣, Voice of America
08/18/2011



Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business


New Chinese President Faces Looming Economic Decisions

News & Media, U-M Ross School of Business
12/12/2012


Capital City Recap with Michael Cohen - a discussion of China-related issues in the U.S. presidential contest

10/22/2011

Linda Lim and John Ciorciari on the Taiwan election, 2012

Target the yuan? It's politics at play
The Strait Times
10/22/2011

Snyder: First trade mission about building relationships
by Tracy Samilton, Michigan Radio
09/23/2011



Robert Adams
Assistant Professor of Architecture

Disability rights influence architecture professor
The University Record
04/02/2012



Donald Lopez
Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor and Department Chair
Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, U-M College of Literature, Science and the Arts

A Tale of Two Scriptures: The American Book of Mormon and the Tibetan Book of the Dead
The Huffington Post
01/31/2012

Mingyur Rinpoche, the millionaire monk who renounced it all
by Mary Finnigan, The Guardian
09/22/2011



Bright Sheng
Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition
U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance

Bright's country
by Kelly Chung Dawson, The China Daily
11/09/2012

Creativity Among the Commissars
by Nicholas Frisch, The Wall Street Journal
05/06/2011



Xiaobing Tang
Professor of Comparative Literature, Helmut F. Stern Professor of Modern Chinese Studies
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts

China Celebrates Author Mo Yan’s Nobel
by Austin Ramzy, Time Magazine
10/11/2012



Yu Xie
Otis Dudley Duncan Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Statistics
U-M College of Literature, Science & the Arts
How Asians displaced Hispanics as biggest group of new US immigrants
by Mark Guarino, The Christian Science Monitor
06/19/2012

New Census Finds China’s Population Growth Has Slowed
by Michael Wines and Sharon LaFraniere, The New York Times
04/28/2011

Posted by zzhu at 02:56 PM

December 06, 2012

The best of Fall 2012!


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All about the 18th Party Congress:

1. Six members of the extended CCS community wrote about their impressions of the 18th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party, which concluded a few weeks ago. Learn what the meeting meant for Chinese-Latin American relations from alumna Victoria Chonn; read political science professor Yuen Yuen Ang's take on the problem of corruption for the party; and look deeper into implications for national health policy with analysis by CCS dual-degree student Damjan DeNoble; and much more! We invite you to participate in the conversation by leaving your own comments.

2. Michigan Law School professor Nicholas Howson was interviewed at length on WILS radio about leadership selection at the top political meeting.


Benefiting from local and global expertise:

3. We were delighted to introduce Asia Healthcare Blog with three recent articles - two of which used the CCS Noon Lectures as jump-off points for wider discussions about China - but there is even more to read and discuss on this leading site for issues related to business, policy, and culture of health management!

4. Fantastic videos for Chinese language students: Complete Chinese subtitles have been added to the two most-watched speeches on election night in the U.S., November 6, 2012!

5. CCS faculty associates commented on China in the news with two very different story lines: Xiaobing Tang, Professor of Comparative Literature and Helmut F. Stern Professor of Modern Chinese Studies, U-M LS&A, gave his assessment of the work and legacy of Mo Yan, this year's Nobel Laureate in Literature; Linda Lim, Professor of Strategy, U-M Ross School of Business, examined China-related issues that have emerged in the U.S. presidential race.


A fond look back at some of the extraordinary events organized or sponsored by CCS this term:

6. October 29: It was an honor to host China Town Hall 2012, which featured a presentation by Richard Solomon, followed by a live Webcast Interview with Gary F. Locke, U.S. Ambassador to China.

7. October 1: The Director King Hu (胡金銓) Retrospective kicked off in spectacular fashion with a screening of the legendary film "Come Drink with Me 大醉侠" in the historic Michigan Theater. The special guest on hand that evening was none other than Ms. Cheng Peipei 鄭佩佩, star of the movie, who provided great insight into King Hu's career and also graciously took countless photos with fans!


Many more opportunities still up for grabs!

8. The 13th Annual Purdue University Annual Graduate Symposium is accepting proposals on the theme of "Humanities and Social Change: How Literature Impacts Class, Gender and Identity" through the end of today, December 7, 2012.

9. Call for papers: The Second Annual UBC Asian Studies Graduate Student Conference - abstracts are due December 31.

10. The 19th North American Taiwan Studies Association Annual Conference (NATSA 2013): Taiwan in Theory - individual papers/panels as well as dissertations are accepted through January 4, 2013.


THANK YOU!

Posted by zzhu at 11:42 PM

May 24, 2012

President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) meets with distinguished U-M alumna


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Taipei, Taiwan, Thursday, May 24, 2012. - President Ma Ying-jeou of Taiwan meets with Jiu-hwa Lo Upshur (羅久華, 羅家倫次女) and praises her for establishing a US$1 million endowed fellowship for Taiwanese graduate students at the University of Michigan. Jiu-hwa Lo Upshur received a PhD in history from the University of Michigan in 1972. She was a Barbour scholar at U-M, as was her mother Djang Wei-djen (張維楨).

In picture (L-R): Jiu-hwa Lo Upshur, Ma Ying-jeou, and Janet Weiss (Dean of U-M Rackham Graduate School).

Press release from the Office of the President can be found here.

Posted by zzhu at 05:44 AM

April 13, 2012

Top Ten Entries of Winter 2012!


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CCS/UM-China in the news:

1. The latest media contributions by CCS faculty associates include a look into how disability rights influence Robert Adam’s work and Nico Howson’s take on Bo Xilai’s political demise and the murder accusation against Bo’s wife.

2. Our alumni are also representing the Center well as sought-after experts on Chinese politics, economy, and society.

3. Several members of the CCS academic community had written highly absorbing guest blogs from the past two Association for Asian Studies (AAS) annual conferences. Our two guest bloggers this year were no exception. Daniel Little, chancellor of the University of Michigan-Dearborn, professor of philosophy at UM-Dearborn, and CCS faculty associate, tackles the questions "Why is there an AAS anyway, and why does it need an annual conference?"; and Carol Stepanchuk, CCS coordinator of outreach and student services, shows us new ways to look at the conference and host city Toronto.

4. CCS has a strong presence on Facebook! Please head on over to check out our beautiful new Timeline and like us today if you have not done so!

A fond look back at some of the extraordinary events organized or sponsored by CCS this term:

5. Tuesday, March 27, 2012: Alumna Roslyn Hammers (PhD '02) gave an entertaining talk on "The Pleasures of the Peony: Regarding the Floral Temptress in the Song Dynasty" – part of the 90th anniversary celebration of the Nichols Arboretum Peony Garden. Bonus image!: Event info includes a picture of kite master Ha Yiqi painting peonies on the ceremonial kite presented during the September 2011 CCS Kite Festival in Nichols Arboretum.

6. Wednesday, March 21: The Tang Junyi Lecture Series featured Brian Bruya, whose fascinating lecture centered on “Nature, Self, and Artifice: On the Divisibility of the Self in Action and Aesthetics.”

7. Still mulling over Xu Tong (徐童)’s Wheat Harvest (麦收), shown on March 3 as part of the Winter 2012 CCS Chinese Documentary Series? Read a CCS community member’s thoughtful review of the film and tell us what you think – this particular entry is open to comments!

Many more opportunities still up for grabs!

8. The National Democratic Institute is seeking to hire a resident program manager in Hong Kong – application deadline is May 8, 2012.

9. Apply to participate in the 2012 UCLA-Fudan Workshop in Scholarly Translation in Shanghai, July 9-27: Applications are accepted through May 1.

10. The Chinese American Society of Ann Arbor is offering three more cooking lessons in its culinary series. Please refer to the schedule if interested in signing up.

THANK YOU!

Posted by zzhu at 12:33 AM

March 19, 2012

Recent media contributions by CCS alumni (updated March 2012)


Bookmark and Share

************************************************
Damien Ma (MA '06)
China Analyst, Eurasia Group

Damien appeared on Charlie Rose Wednesday, March 15, 2012 to discussed Bo Xilai's ouster, the biggest political story coming out of China in recent years.


Damien's conversation with James Fallows on recent Chinese crackdown


Damien Ma's other articles on China
in The Atlantic


************************************************
Michael Dunne (MA/MBA '90)
President, Dunne & Company

Need to learn Punjabi, Swahili or dozens of other languages? U-M is the place
The University of Michigan Record
03/12/2012

American Wheels, Chinese Roads
LSA Today
01/24/2012


************************************************
Elizabeth C. Economy (PhD '94, Political Science)
C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies
Council on Foreign Relations

China's Land Grab Epidemic Is Causing More Wukan-Style Protests
The Atlantic
02/08/2012

Elizabeth Economy's other articles on China
in The Atlantic

Foreign Affairs Focus On: Protests in China and China's Interests in North Korea
12/29/2011

Time for the United States to Learn from China
(reviews book by alumnus Michael Dunne (MA/MBA '90))
Asia Unbound
07/11/2011

************************************************
David Moser (CCS MA '89, PhD '96 - Asian Languages and Cultures)
Academic Director at CET Chinese Studies, Beijing Capital Normal University
Thoughts on River Elegy, June 1988-June 2011
The China Beat
07/14/2011

************************************************
David Shambaugh (PhD '89, Political Science)
Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University
Ten Questions for China’s Heir Presumptive
The New York Times
02/10/2012

Posted by zzhu at 10:47 PM

February 28, 2012

U-M Public Health in China


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Blogging from China: U-M Public Health partnerships in the world's most populous nation

Click below to read experiences of School of Public Health faculty who are currently on an academic exchange trip to China.

Posted by zzhu at 12:17 PM

February 21, 2012

Two-part CCTV documentary on U-M professor Jun Ni (倪军)


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Jun Ni (倪军) is Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Director, S.M. Wu Manufacturing Research Center; Co-Director, Multi-Campus National Science Foundation Center for Intelligent Maintenance Systems; Deputy Director, NSF-Engineering Research Center for Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems; Collegiate Professor, SM Wu Manufacturing Science; Shien-Ming (Sam) Wu Collegiate Professor of Manufacturing; Dean, UM-Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute.

The documentary tells fascinating stories from Ni's life and career, reflecting upon challenges and triumphs of a scientist who strives to bridge China and the U.S. through educational exchange and collaborative research.

Chinese and English subtitles are provided.

Part 1 of 华人故事:机械制造领域的传奇-倪军 Jun Ni: A Legendary Figure in Mechanical Engineering and Manufacturing Science


Part 2 of 华人故事:机械制造领域的传奇-倪军 Jun Ni: A Legendary Figure in Mechanical Engineering and Manufacturing Science

Posted by zzhu at 12:26 AM

February 09, 2012

CCS faculty associate Bright Sheng premieres his "Dance Capriccio" this Saturday, February 11, 2012

Read Detroit Free Press's review of the premiere.

Shanghai String Quartet
with
Peter Serkin, piano

Saturday, February 11, 2012 at 8:00 PM
Seligman Center for the Performing Arts

Music of Mozart, Dvorak, and a World Premiere by Bright Sheng, CCS faculty associate and Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

More information can be found on the Web site of Chamber Music Society of Detroit.

Posted by zzhu at 11:22 PM

January 31, 2012

CCS Faculty Associate Martin Powers to give talk at National Gallery of Art, Washington DC


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Solving the East / West Conundrum in Modern Chinese Art
Sunday, February 19, 1:00 p.m. (in Mandarin), 2:00 p.m. (in English)
Martin J. Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures, University of Michigan

General Information
The National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are at all times free to the public. They are located on the National Mall between 3rd and 9th Streets at Constitution Avenue NW, and are open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The Gallery is closed on December 25 and January 1. For information call (202) 737-4215 or the Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) at (202) 842-6176, or visit the Gallery's Web site at www.nga.gov.

Posted by zzhu at 12:25 AM

January 25, 2012

Ruralopolitan Maneuvers: HOUSE 50


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Exhibit: January 20 - April 15, 2012, every Friday and Saturday, 2 PM – 7 PM
University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning Liberty Research Annex, 305 W. Liberty St., Ann Arbor

Today, one in every ten people in the world lives in a rural Chinese village- the most endangered human habitat on the face of the earth. Architecture has largely focused on, and been fascinated by the city and urbanism. This project turns its attention toward the rural village, and is part of a larger project that looks at what we call “Ruralopolitan Space” – a space that is neither purely urban or rural, but is a new hybrid and continuum between the two. Preservation - yes and no - bringing the rural village into the 21st century socially, economically and architecturally - yes.

For the Research Through Making project, we focused on the making of several intimate pieces at the scale of the house as well as on one village/township scaled infrastructure including translucent thermal curtains, a zero energy cold food storage and a forty foot long illuminated balloon called CLOUD that provides wireless internet to one rural village. Each project needed to be acutely aware of cost and availability of materials close at hand as it is operating in an environment in which the average yearly household income is $560 U.S.

Project Team
Robert Mangurian and Mary-Ann Ray
with Robert Adams, David Gregor, Irene Keil, Philip Lee, Zhang Jian, and Zhao Zhifeng; Richard Tursky (EXHIBIT Project Manager); Vikram Ivatury (CLOUD Engineer)

Additional help from
Jessie Cui, Sara Dean, Matt Dolan, Johnny Dwyer, Deena Etter, Ryan Fiebing, Oscar Garcia, Nicholas Ho, Kyle Kramer, Jason Prasad, Mindy Rouse, Catherine Wang, Philip Yu-Huan Wang, Sabrina I-Hsuan Wang, Kyle Wyatt, and Echo Ying Xiang

Special thanks and acknowledgments to
Tom Buresh; Caroline Constant; Douglas Kelbaugh; Mike Shriberg; Ai Weiwei, consultant; Beijing University of Technology; Pearl Valley Township; Shang Shui Guo Village Leader Zhang Shang Shui Guo Villagers; Kaymont Meteorological Balloons

Additional support has been generously provided by
Graham Foundation for the Arts; Michael Levine Fabrics; UM Center for Chinese Studies; Center for Global Intercultural Studies; Confucius Institute; Department of Oceanic, Atmospheric and Space Engineering; Experiential Learning Fund; Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute; International Institute; UM Office of the Vice President for Research 2011 Small Projects Grant

Posted by zzhu at 01:13 PM

January 20, 2012

Happy Year of the Dragon!


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(Loli, via tooopen.com)

祝大家龙年吉祥!万事如意!

Posted by zzhu at 12:42 AM

January 19, 2012

Please.


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Posted by zzhu at 01:11 AM

January 17, 2012

Linda Lim and John Ciorciari on the Taiwan election


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Linda Lim
Professor of Strategy
U-M Ross School of Business
CCS Faculty Associate


Ma's victory a vote for rapprochement

Oman Observer - Online

Taiwan's China opening gets voter support but pace may slow
The Straits Times - Online

What next for Taiwan's economic links?
Today Online



John Ciorciari
Assistant Professor
U-M Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy


Taiwan's Ma wins vote but faces tough second term

Daily Times - Online
(Also New Sabah Times and Channel NewsAsia)

Beijing, US greet Ma win with sigh of relief
The Standard - Online

2012 ELECTIONS: China willing to work with Taiwan: Yang Yi
Taipei Times - Online

Posted by zzhu at 12:17 AM

January 01, 2012

Recent media contributions by CCS alumni


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Sarah M. Brooks (MA/MPP '11)
Carter Center
China’s water politics: debating the Three Gorges Dam
Chinaelectionsblog.net
05/26/2011


Elizabeth C. Economy (PhD '94, Political Science)
C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies
Council on Foreign Relations

Foreign Affairs Focus On: Protests in China and China's Interests in North Korea
12/29/2011

Time for the United States to Learn from China
(reviews book by alumnus Michael Dunne (MA/MBA '90))
Asia Unbound
07/11/2011


Damien Ma (MA '06)
China Analyst, Eurasia Group
Conversation with James Fallows on recent Chinese crackdown

Damien Ma's articles on China
The Atlantic


David Moser (CCS MA '89, PhD '96 - Asian Languages and Cultures)
Academic Director at CET Chinese Studies, Beijing Capital Normal University
Thoughts on River Elegy, June 1988-June 2011
The China Beat
07/14/2011

Posted by zzhu at 02:08 PM

December 09, 2011

The best of Fall 2011!


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Hip, hip, hooray for CCS!!!

1. Many thanks for helping us celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of CCS. Please click here to see what Professor Emeritus Kenneth Lieberthal has to say about the long and storied history of the relationship between U-M and China and about Chinese currency and other issues in U.S.-China relations today.

2. For 50 years, CCS faculty associates have been leading scholars on China past and present. Check out the latest media comments made by Center faculty.

3. In the meantime, our alumni are also representing the Center well as sought-after experts on Chinese politics, economy, and society.

4. It was an extremely gratifying experience to have so many CCS, U-M and Ann Arbor community members join in the activities of the New Millennium Kite Festival. Click here to relive one of the biggest events of the term.

5. By now, you must have heard about the long-forgotten collection of rare Chinese propaganda paper-cut images recently rediscovered in a CCS storage room. Since the word got out, we have heard from many excited alumni and friends!

A fond look back at some of the amazing events organized or sponsored by CCS this fall (most are available in video format):

6. Multiple Impressions: Contemporary Chinese Woodblock Prints, a spectacular exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art, also offered a multitude of fun and educational public events planned around this exhibition, including CCS Public Lecture by artist CHEN Qi (陈琦), who talked about "A Chinese Printmaker’s Cultural Identity and the Transformation in Contemporary Printmaking."

7. Author and Journalist Mara Hvistendahl's book Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys Over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men is just named one of the best books of 2011 by slate.com. Back in September, Hvistendahl paid U-M a special visit and gave a presentation on "Unnatural Selection: The Causes and Consequences of Asia's Sex Ratio Imbalance." For links to reviews of the book and Hvistendahl’s media appearances, please click here.

8. CCS and the National Committee on US-China Relations joined forces in presenting China Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections, a national day of programming on China involving 50 cities throughout the United States and featuring a nation-wide webcast and on-site panel discussion.

9. Gail Hershatter, Distinguished Professor and Chair, University of California, Santa Cruz and President of the Association for Asian Studies (2011-2012), gave a compelling lecture entitled "The Girl Who Burned the Banknotes: Rural Women and China's Collective Past."

10. Extraordinary performances by an extraordinary cultural gem! Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan, presented by University Musical Society, captivated audiences in the Power Center.

Posted by zzhu at 12:40 AM

November 03, 2011

Re-examining CCS's rare Chinese papercut collection


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Read all about the amazing collection here.

Rare set of images found at University of Michigan tell story of China’s Cultural Revolution
The Washington Post, 11/06/2011.

This story was also reported (mostly online) by:
- Teleread
- The China Post
- The Cranbrook Daily Townsman
- Crescent-News
- The Daily Comet
- Honolulu Star-Advertiser
- The Huffington Post
- Idaho State Journal
- International Business Times, Hong Kong
- Nevada Appeal
- Prince Albert Daily Herald
- Times-News
- Westman Journal
- Yahoo! News
- Canadian Press
- CHNI-FM
- CKNI-FM (News 91.9)
- Columbus Telegram
- Detroit Free Press
- FindLaw: Legal News and Commentary
- Inside Scoop SF
- KNUS-AM
- Metro Edmonton
- Metro Ottawa
- The Miami Herald
- The News-Review
- Penticton Herald
- Star Tribune
- The Sun News
- Times Union
- Washington Post
- Weyburn Review
- WFLC-FM
- WFTV-TV
- WGCL-TV
- WTRF-TV
- jandan.net (煎蛋)


Wang Zheng, CCS Associate Director, and Professor of Women's Studies and History, talk about the historical and cultural significance of the work.


Please click on the image to see the entire collection.

Posted by zzhu at 09:40 PM

September 11, 2011

President Coleman highlights multitude of China events in Fall 2011 welcome video



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Lots of great offerings this term! Please click below to watch the video.

Posted by zzhu at 03:03 PM

July 11, 2011

East Asian Centers create fun evening at Top of the Park


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Learn more about the upcoming kite festival at U-M!

On Tuesday, July 5, 2010, the Center for Chinese Studies, the Center for Japanese Studies, and the Nam Center for Korean Studies co-hosted an evening of fun and creativity under the Kid Zone tent at Top of the Park, Ann Arbor Summer Festival. Please check out the slideshow for some of the pictures taken at the event.

Posted by zzhu at 04:41 PM

June 27, 2011

Another day in the kite master's studio


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Learn more about the upcoming kite festival at U-M!

With support from the Center for Chinese Studies, U-M School of Art & Design faculty Anne Mondro and Matt Shlian are in Beijing this summer working with HA Yiqi, renowned Chinese kite master.

Posted by zzhu at 11:29 AM

June 14, 2011

Other U-M Faculty discuss China in the News


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John Ciorciari
Assistant Professor
U-M Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Chinese dilemmas in the South China Sea
cnn.com
06/23/2011



Steven J. Wright
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
U-M College Engineering
Three Gorges Dam
CBC Radio
06/08/2011

Posted by zzhu at 01:14 PM

April 21, 2011

The best of Winter 2011!


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Staying busy:

1. Monday, May 9, 2011: Free concert in Mandarin Chinese and Taiwanese dialects celebrating Amazing Taiwan Music Culture Tour, Farmington Hills.

2. Friday-Saturday, May 20-21: Michigan Meeting "Developing Global Sustainability - U.S./China Partnerships."

3. July 16 - October 23: Major exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art - Multiple Impressions: Contemporary Chinese Woodblock Prints.


Keeping up with the times:

4. Whenever there is a China/U.S. state visit, CCS alumni become extra busy as different media outlets chase after them for insightful commentaries. This January’s U.S. visit by Chinese president Hu Jintao is no exception.

5. U-M history professor and CCS faculty associate Christian de Pee, blogs from the Joint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and International Convention of Asia Scholars in Honolulu.

6. Attention, iPhone, iPad and Android device users! Install the free Pulse app on your phone and/or tablet and experience CCS blog in a brand new way!


Job hunting for China hands:

7. Manager, Confucius Institute @ China Institute, New York, NY.

8. Coordinator, Year of China at Brown University.

9. Position at Sotheby's: Chinese Works of Art Specialist.

10. NYU in Shanghai is hiring!

Posted by zzhu at 11:03 PM

April 05, 2011

Professor Christian de Pee's AAS blog


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Professor Christian de Pee, U-M Department of History, shares his experience from the Joint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies and International Convention of Asia Scholars in Honolulu. We are grateful for his time and attention.


Thursday, March 31:

Trickles of scholars flowed westward from the Eastern Seaboard and the Midwest, collecting in more substantial streams in California for the journey across the Pacific to Hawai’i—and some of these trickling streams were Blue: at Wayne County International Airport, I encountered fellow CCS members Pär Cassel, Ellen Laing, and Shuen-fu Lin, and in Los Angeles we were joined by Gang Liu (Rackham 2010) and Deborah Solomon (Rackham 2009). The shuttle bus from the airport was full of scholars of Asia, leafing through their programs and catching up with colleagues from distant places. But as the bus emptied its contents into the hotel lobbies of Waikiki, the scholars disappeared among vacationing families and sunburned tourists, amid leis, souvenirs, and surfboards.

Friday, April 1:

Some fifty scholars gathered at 10:15 a.m. to attend the panel “Metropologies: Imperial Cities and Literary Form in China,” conceived by Benjamin Ridgway (Rackham 2005) and Gang Liu. Shuen-fu Lin provided introductions, and four presenters each gave a concise analysis of the representation of an imperial city in one distinct literary genre: Michael Nylan (UC Berkeley) analyzed Chang’an during the late Western Han (206 BCE-9 CE) as it emerges from memorials to the throne; Linda Feng (University of Toronto) pointed to the commercial pageantry surrounding the imperial examinations in Chang’an, visible in the margins of informal prose works of the Tang dynasty (618-907); Benjamin Ridgway (Valparaiso University) examined the literary and discursive politics of Wang Shipeng’s rhapsodies on Shaoxing, the spurned temporary capital of the Southern Song (1127-1279); and Gang Liu (Carnegie Mellon University) spoke about the combination of nostalgia and criticism in accounts of Hangzhou, in notebooks written during the Yuan dynasty (1271-1368). After I offered some brief, general remarks about the relationship between urban space and literary form, and proposed some specific ways in which a semiotic approach to generic conventions might strengthen the argument of the individual papers, members of the audience contributed their insights and questions. Discussions continued in the hallway of the convention center, until the members of the panel descended the escalators and crossed the street for a celebratory luncheon at a Korean restaurant.

Saturday, April 2:

At 8:00 a.m. I met with a dear friend who had invited me to join her on a visit to the Hawai’ian estate of the late Doris Duke, which is managed by the Honolulu Academy of Arts. In the company of a guide and a small tour group we wondered at the combination of Islamic antiques, nineteenth-century Near Eastern crafts, and twentieth-century American imitations of Islamic patterns and techniques that decorate this idiosyncratic piece of 1930s architecture, situated on a bluff amid landscaped gardens. And we admired the view of the ocean, stretching under a blue, wind-swept sky beyond the sliding windows and hydraulic façade of the living room and below the colonnaded terrace.

Back at the convention center in the afternoon, I attended a meeting and a panel, and sought opportunities for the random encounters that are the most enjoyable and often the most valuable part of these professional conferences. Where else does one meet in one place former teachers and former fellow students, old acquaintances made at a seminar in Europe or at a research institute in China, and esteemed colleagues from across the world? It is not uncommon that one walks up to a group of friends who introduce one (“Oh, do you know each other?”) to an unfamiliar person who turns out to be the author of an admired monograph, or whom one knows from an instructive electronic correspondence. And so I reminisced about a sojourn in Chengdu, shared insights with graduate students pursuing work parallel to my own, discussed work in progress with a variety of peers, repeated old jokes with a former colleague, and shared with a few friends a bottle of Michigan sparkling wine that I had brought to celebrate the recent approval of my tenure file by the College.

Sunday, April 3:

On Sunday the conference gradually ebbed away. Booksellers sold their display copies, panels became more sparsely attended, and scholars with hurried step (their forgotten name tag flapping) rolled their well-traveled suitcases toward buses and taxis. Some confessed that they had not yet overcome their jet lag as they prepared to return to California, to Ohio, to Europe. And just as suddenly as this community of Asian scholars had gathered in academic debate and lively conversations, so it dispersed into the dark, humid skies above Honolulu International Airport.

Posted by zzhu at 01:08 PM

February 03, 2011

Happy Lunar New Year!


Artist: ZHANG Shaojun

All the best in the Year of the Rabbit!
密歇根大学中国研究所祝大家在新的一年里身体健康、心想事成!

Posted by zzhu at 10:28 AM

February 01, 2011

College of Engineering highlights Chinese New Year celebration


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Click on image to read the story, watch a video and view beautiful photos.

Posted by zzhu at 05:00 PM

January 18, 2011

CCS alumni expertise in the media spotlight during Hu Jintao's state visit to U.S.


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Please note that is just a selection of CCS alumni and their commentaries widely sought-after and highlighted by the media during Chinese president Hu Jintao's U.S. visit.

Nicholas Lardy (PhD '75) - Anthony M. Solomon Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics
Billion Dollar Deals Come From President Obama and President Hu Meeting
PBS Nightly Business Report, 1/19/2011
U.S. companies dump billions into China
CNNMoney.com, 1/20/2011

Damien Ma (CCS MA '07) - Analyst, Eurasia Group
China's Military, Economic And Domestic Agendas
Talk of the Nation, National Public Radio, 1/11/2011

David Shambaugh (PhD '88) - Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, China Policy Program, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University
Will U.S.-China Talks Reset Tone in a Competitive Relationship?
PBS NewsHour, 1/19/2011

Posted by zzhu at 04:29 PM

December 16, 2010

The best of Fall 2010!


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Watch online:

1. Two lengthy, in-depth television interviews with U-M president Mary Sue Coleman during her trip to China this summer – one at CCTV International and one with Phoenix TV (凤凰卫视).

2. Panel III of International Institute Symposium: Rethinking Area Studies, entitled “Studying Chinese Politics in an Age of Specialization” - presented by Kevin O’Brien, Alann P. Bedford Professor of Asian Studies and Professor of Political Science, University of California at Berkeley; one of the respondents was Christian de Pee, CCS faculty associate and Assistant Professor of History, U-M LS&A. Video of the other panels are also available.

3. Keynote addresses and discussion panels of the Second China Entrepreneur Forum, featuring Tian Yuan, Yasheng Huang, CCS director Mary Gallagher, Jack Hu, Stuart Hart, among other important entrepreneurs and scholars.

CCS/UM-China in the news:

4. Chinese print media outlets such as Beijing Youth Daily (北京青年报), CBN Weekly (第一财经周刊), Jiefang Daily (解放日报), and Southern People Weekly (南方人物周刊) also provided extensive coverage of the U-M visit led by President Coleman.

5. A comprehensive compilation of CCS director and associate professor of political science Mary Gallagher’s media commentary and interviews on recent labor tension and unrest in China.

6. Martin Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures at U-M and CCS faculty associate, participates in important events celebrating the work of Wu Guanzhong (吴冠中).

7. By day, he is a China Analyst at Eurasia Group; by night, he is a columnist for The Atlantic. Check out CCS alumnus Damien Ma’s China essays online.

China-related jobs and fellowships around the world:

8. Two faculty positions at Shantou University - full-time positions in Philosophy and Global History, respectively.

9. Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Sinology at Stockholm University – deadline for applications is January 31, 2011.

10. Centre for Chinese Studies at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa is looking to fill a postdoctoral research fellowship position.

Posted by zzhu at 08:23 PM

December 13, 2010

CCS alumnus pens popular column for The Atlantic


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Damien Ma (CCS MA '07) has been putting his China expertise to good use as a China analyst at Eurasia Group and as a columnist for The Atlantic. In about five months, Damien has written over two dozen compelling essays on China-related topics such as environment, trade, and technology, all of which are highly recommended reading for fans of the CCS blog!

Photo: Eurasia Group

Posted by zzhu at 08:57 PM

November 18, 2010

CCS faculty associate Martin Powers participates in forums and lectures celebrating the work of Wu Guanzhong (吴冠中)

Martin Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures at U-M, and a former CCS director, will join a group of international scholars at events related to a major exhibition of Wu Guanzhong (吴冠中)'s work.

Largest collection of Wu Guanzhong ever, at Zhejiang Art Museum
People's Daily
11/17/2010

最大规模吴冠中艺术作品展20日将在浙江开展
人民网-文化频道
11/16/2010

Posted by zzhu at 03:41 PM

November 04, 2010

China Data Center in the news

China Data Center at the University of Michigan was the statistical source for a recent MSNBC story on China's deepening income disparity.

China's wealth gap strains social fabric
by John W. Schoen, msnbc.com
10/20/2010

Posted by zzhu at 06:38 PM

October 28, 2010

U-M alumnus WANG Feng Named Senior Fellow and Director of the Brookings-Tsinghua Center in Beijing



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Photo: www.brookings.edu

Wang was born in China and went on to build a successful academic career in the United States. He has been at the University of California, Irvine since 1996. He...holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. in sociology from the University of Michigan. Over the years, his in-depth field research on China has been published extensively in both English and Chinese.

Brookings Press Release

Posted by zzhu at 08:50 PM

October 26, 2010

CCS faculty associate Joseph Lam profiled for his role as Confucius Institute director



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Photo by Doug Coombe for Concentrate Media

Chinese culture is global. We want different voices, different interpretations.

"Confucius Says..."
by Constance Crump, Concentrate
10/20/2010

Posted by zzhu at 04:52 PM

September 16, 2010

Explaining the Michigan Difference, in Chinese


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From a special edition of e-TrueBlue: China, published by the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan:

University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman met with hundreds of parents in conjunction with her travel to Shanghai and Beijing last June-July. These sessions were lively exchanges of information about what life is like for our U-M students from China, and parents asked dozens of questions. We were able to record those questions and have since worked with staff across campus to create answers that may be helpful to future U-M students and their parents.

We hope that readers of this special issue of eTrueBlue:China will forward this notice to parents, prospective students, family and business associates to help get information out into the broader Chinese public about student life at the University of Michigan.

Click here to view the questions and answers, which are in Chinese and English.

Go Blue!

Jo Rumsey
Vice President
Alumni Association of the University of Michigan

Posted by zzhu at 09:17 PM

August 20, 2010

Chinese print media coverage of official U-M visit to China in summer 2010 - SELECT ARTICLES


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Southern People Weekly 南方人物周刊

China Education News 中国教育报

Please click on clipping for full article.

CBN Weekly 第一财经周刊


International Finance News 国际金融报

Jiefang Daily 解放日报

Shanghai Evening Post 新闻晚报

Beijing Youth Daily 北京青年报

Shanghai Times 申江服务导报

Shanghai Securities News 上海证券报

Posted by zzhu at 07:46 PM

July 26, 2010

President Mary Sue Coleman's television interviews in China



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Interview on CCTV show Dialogue with host Tian Wei (田薇), taped in Beijing July 1, 2010 and premiered all around the world July 23, 2010. Please click below to watch the interview in its entirety.

Phoenix TV interview with Sheng-Yang Chiang (姜声扬, LSA '99), taped in Hong Kong June 27, 2010 and originally aired in Greater China region July 9, 2010 (English with Chinese subtitles).

The complete Chinese transcript of this show can be found here.

Posted by zzhu at 09:25 PM

July 25, 2010

President Coleman discusses U.S.-China cooperation with Chinese State Councilor Liu



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This is a borrowed entry from Jefferson Porter's wonderful U-M Giving in China Blog.


Partners: President Coleman and Chinese State Councilor Liu Yandong (photo: Xinhua/Huang Jingwen)

Chinese media gave prominent coverage to our meeting July 1 with State Councilor Liu Yandong (刘延东). Madame Liu praised Michigan’s cooperation with the Ministry of Education and Chinese universities, including Peking University and Shanghai Jiaotong University. The considerable planning that went into this meeting paid off as the high-level discussion was a success and a very important step in UM’s continuing efforts to build relationships in China.

President Coleman was accompanied to the meeting by Professor Ken Lieberthal, Deans David Munson (Engineering) and Terrence McDonald (LS&A), Professors Jun Ni and Mary Gallagher and UM China Initiatives Coordinator Jen Zhu.

News footage from CCTV-1:

Chinese-language coverage on China’s government website.

English-language story from the Xinhua News Agency.

Posted by zzhu at 09:54 PM

July 19, 2010

The New York Times cites U-M business school professor and CCS faculty associate Linda Lim and her latest book



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Linda Lim, a professor of business strategy at the University of Michigan, said financial liberalization had helped Asian rebalancing but was incomplete because of nationalist objections and resistance to increased competition.

"I.M.F. Turns on the Charm in Asia"
by Alan Wheatley, The New York Times
07/19/2010

Posted by zzhu at 02:20 PM

June 25, 2010

U-M President Mary Sue Coleman's op-ed article for Forbes.com on her trip to China in summer 2010



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It is more important than ever to work with fellow educational leaders in China as we reshape our economies and societies and address common challenges.

"Education Without Borders"
by Mary Sue Coleman, Forbes.com
06/25/2010

Posted by zzhu at 05:11 PM

June 02, 2010

U-M Professor of Sociology and CCS faculty associate Yu Xie's major China survey highlighted in Science Magazine


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SUMMARY: This month, scores of interviewers dispersed across China for the start of a study that aims to document everything from emotional stress to family planning. They expect to reach 60,000 respondents in 25 provinces—making the survey the largest undertaking of its kind in the developing world. The Chinese Family Panel Studies, as the project is called, should provide abundant fodder for data-starved social scientists hoping to track how China's rapid development is shaping societal values, say the sociologists who designed the new survey. Through this year's baseline survey and annual follow-up visits, they say, researchers will be able to document some of the biggest changes in history.

Survey to Reveal True Face of Chinese Society
(中文版)
by Mara Hvistendahl, Science
04/30/2010

(U-M affiliates may have to first log in through MLibrary in order to read English version of article.)

Posted by zzhu at 06:30 PM

May 14, 2010

Ken Lieberthal comments on US-China cooperation on climate change, May 10, 2010

Posted by zzhu at 01:15 PM

May 11, 2010

World Expo 2010 blog - Week 2: Opening Week



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OPENING WEEK

The opening week of the 2010 Shanghai Expo is coming to a close. Although the U.S.A. Pavilion has had some setbacks here and there, things have been running remarkably smooth. One of the things that I have heard from many guests, the majority of which are Chinese, is how impressed and delighted they are at having the opportunity to interact with young, Mandarin-speaking Americans. Likewise, I know that the eighty student ambassadors are equally as appreciative to have the opportunity to communicate with the guests, learn something about Chinese culture, and do their part to positively represent the United States to the millions of visitors who will walk through the U.S. Pavilion’s turnstiles this summer.

On a more personal note, thus far, my work here at the U.S. Pavilion as a student ambassador has been rewarding but also exhausting. My shifts rotate from week-to-week on a rolling basis from 8am-5pm and 2pm-11pm. I am assigned predominantly to the V.I.P. area, which has been dubbed the “1776 Suite.” My duties include welcoming guests (government officials, dignitaries, and corporate delegations), facilitating corporate and government events, and offering general assistance in all areas of V.I.P. relations including event set-up, operations and logistics. As to the “corporate events” function of the V.I.P. center I feel that a few words of explanation are necessary. Unlike most of the other countries’ national pavilions, the U.S. Pavilion was funded entirely by corporate sponsors as opposed to coming out of the government coffers. As a result, contributing sponsors were given membership cards in amounts congruent with their contribution. There has actually been quite a bit of controversy surrounding how funds for the U.S.A.P. were allocated. For more on this, just do a Google search for “Adam Minter, U.S.A. Pavilion.”

My experiences in the VIP area have been exciting and have included meeting various mayors from cities such as Suzhou and Xiamen, and C.C.P. officials such as the minister of Foreign Affairs, Yang Jiechi. I was also present for a meet and greet with American music legend Quincy Jones. However, the most interesting experience that I had in the last week was meeting the president of China, Hu Jintao (see photo below, I am wearing the blue striped tie). He visited the U.S.A. Pavilion two days before the official opening with an entourage of about eighty people, including various members of the Politburo. In a brief ceremony, President Hu shook hands with the Student Ambassadors and was presented with a Texas belt-buckle by the U.S.A.P.’s Commissioner General Jose Villarreal. There was also state-media on hand for the visit, and the photo which I have included below was on the front page of various newspapers the following day. Regardless of one’s feelings about the C.C.P. or the Party’s censorship of the media, this was a great opportunity for myself and the other Student Ambassadors to get involved in some hands-on diplomacy, and have a chance to live up to our title of “Ambassadors."

In addition to being the face of the U.S.A. Pavilion while we are on the job, we will also have the opportunity to get involved in various community outreach projects over the next few months. These include programs like “Roots and Shoots,” which aims at educating local middle school students on the importance of environmental awareness and sustainable practices.

Well, that’s about all the time I have for this week. In the coming weeks I plan to offer some more in-depth coverage of various aspects of the U.S.A. Pavilion, the highlights of other pavilions at the Expo, as well as include some interview content with U.S.A.P. organizers and Expo visitors. If there is any specific aspect of the Expo that you would like to hear more about, please feel free to contact me at: calebjford@gmail.com. Also, here is an interesting article about the U.S.A.P. which highlights the role of the Student Ambassadors.

Posted by zzhu at 09:39 PM

April 29, 2010

The Best of Winter 2010



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The evolution of the Google dispute:

1. University of Michigan Law School professor and CCS faculty associate Nico Howson discusses Google’s exit from China as well as the Rio Tinto case on Bloomberg TV’s “Morning Call.”

2. Professor Emeritus Ken Lieberthal talks to the New York Times about the Google fallout.

3. And check out our compilation of articles – from local and international news sources – on the hacking allegations. Mary Gallagher, Associate Professor of Political Science and CCS Director, is quoted in the AnnArbor.com article.

Faculty get in on the fun:
CCS faculty guest blog from the Association for Asian Studies annual meeting in Philadelphia:

4. Mary Gallagher, associate professor of political science and CCS director, shares her short but busy time at the conference.

5. Joseph Lam offers a personal look into the past and future of scholarship.

6. David Porter tackles the issues of memory and forgetting.

A fond look-back at Winter 2010 events:

7. Watch the 20th Annual Asia Business Conference Keynote Panel discussion online in its entirety.

8. The U-M Men’s Glee Club premieres two Chinese songs at its 150th Annual Spring Concert.

9. A Richard Baum double-header!

10. The Inaugural Tang Junyi Lecture Series presented by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures features four lectures by Stephen C. Angle, Professor of Philosophy, Wesleyan University, all on the central theme of “Contemporary Confucian Virtue Politics.”

Posted by zzhu at 11:06 PM

Michigan Law professor Nicholas Howson talks to "Economic Observer" (经济观察报) about SEC's Goldman Sachs investigation



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"SEC突袭高盛:战斗已经打响 但胜负不明"
by 张斐斐 袁朝晖, 经济观察网
04/26/2010


In an interview with China's "Economic Observer" (经济观察报), Professor Nicholas Howson, University of Michigan Law School professor and CCS faculty associate, addresses the difficulties facing the SEC under US securities law in proving materiality in their case against Goldman, and the political impact of the SEC case on the SEC's rehabilitation. (Please note that the article is written in Chinese.)

Posted by zzhu at 11:01 AM

April 24, 2010

World Expo 2010 blog - week 1



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WEEK 1

A week has passed since my arrival in Shanghai. This is my first day off from the non-stop training, protocol meetings and seminars. The jet lag has worn off and I finally have an opportunity to post what I hope will be the first of a weekly series of blogs highlighting my experiences as a student ambassador at the USA pavilion inside the 2010 Shanghai World Expo. For those of you who are not familiar with this event (there was surprisingly little U.S. media attention surrounding the Expo by the time of my departure) I will start off by giving a brief explanation of what the World Expo is all about, and why this particular one is so important.

This World Expo, previously known as the World’s Fair, is a six month long event showcasing the culture, customs, history, and technology from countries all over the globe. In addition to the 192 temporary national pavilions on the Expo grounds, there is an abundance of corporate pavilions and a handful of permanent structures which house museums, entertainment venues, and eateries. Possibly more significant is the fact that, with an expected seventy million visitors, this is set to be, not only the biggest World Expo in the history of the event, but also one of the largest human gatherings in the history of planet earth. Riding in on the momentum of the 2008 Olympics, China and the city of Shanghai is prepped to stage yet another event befitting of the power-house image of the world’s most populated country.

As for my role in this gigantic undertaking, I am one of the approximately eighty college students and recent graduates from universities throughout the U.S. who were selected to carry out a number of key roles at the U.S.A. Pavilion over the next three months (a new batch of eighty students will be arriving in late July to take over our duties). Most of the student ambassadors have significant China experience, either as former study-abroad participants, interns, or as independent travelers. Chinese language abilities were a prerequisite and this will probably serve as the most significant test of those skills to date, as they will be needed to interact with the Pavilion’s visitors, most of whom are expected to be Chinese citizens. We will guide them through the Pavilion’s three exhibition halls (read: movie theaters) and be available to answer any questions they may have.

These past few days were a test run for the pavilion staff as we hosted the “soft-opening”, or 试运营. There was an air of general excitement among the Pavilion staff and the tens of thousands of visitors who have passed through the turnstiles over the past few days. Although there have already been some major challenges, it appears that the U.S.A. Pavilion, or USAP as it has been dubbed by our leadership, is set to be one of the most popular attractions at the Expo. In fact, the USAP is expected to be second only to the China Pavilion in terms of overall visitors. I got the opportunity to welcome quite a few groups of several hundred visitors at a time in the first area of the USAP which everyone here calls the “Overture”. With nothing but a microphone between myself and the massive groups of visitors who poured into the Overture area (approximately 300-500 at a time), I had the opportunity to welcome them, explain what the Pavilion and its exhibits are all about, and try to relieve their anxieties stemming from having to wait for several hours in cue just to see the Overture hall displaying a three-minute video which features the barely intelligible mandarin greetings of a few prominent American athletes and politicians. I tried my best to quell the disappointment and frustration of many visitors (many of which had already waited for hours just to be let through the Expo’s front gates) by cracking a few jokes, mustering up my most academic idioms or 成语, and trying to convince them to come back and see the rest of the pavilion after its official opening on May 1st. My attempts to relieve the tension in the air seemed to be fairly effective and I was relieved to get the crowds smiling, laughing, and having a good time. The experience was both exhilarating and physically draining.

This evening I attended a welcome event at the U.S. consulate and had the opportunity to meet with foreign-service officers, consulate staff, and the Shanghai Consul General Beatrice Camp (see photo below). It was a fun event, replete with American-style barbeque, and was the first of many great networking opportunities to come.

Overall, my experience thus far has been a positive one. It has been a real pleasure to work alongside the other student ambassadors, USAP organizers and, most of all, to get a chance to represent the U.S.A. and the University of Michigan and engage in a dialogue with so many inquisitive and (predominantly) warm and welcoming Chinese visitors to the pavilion. This will definitely be an event for the record books and a summer to remember. Throughout my stay here I will try and cover more focused aspects of the Expo in my blogs, so please check back from time to time for more information and anecdotes. If you are planning on attending the Expo, or just have any questions or comments about the event, please feel free to contact me at calebjford@gmail.com. Also, I would like to send out a special word of thanks to Jen Zhu and the CCS staff and faculty at U of M for cheering me on and encouraging me to write this blog. Thank you all for your support and go blue!


Guest blogger Caleb Ford (right) and Beatrice Camp, Consul General, United States Consulate in Shanghai.

Posted by zzhu at 06:25 PM

April 07, 2010

U-M researcher talks about her work on China's aging population



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More than 100 million Chinese people are 65 and older, and the proportion is expected to increase rapidly. Deborah Lowry, a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Survey Research discusses how Chinese families in the country and the city are coping with caring for aging family members as a "grey tide" sweeps through China's population. Please click below to watch the entire video segment.

Posted by zzhu at 04:06 PM

March 31, 2010

Alumni Association's "e-TrueBlue: China" interviews Chinese studies alumna


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Joys Cheung (PhD '08), who wrote her dissertation on "Chinese Music and Translated Modernity in Shanghai, 1918-1937" and who now teaches at City University of Hong Kong, is featured in "Alumni Spotlight" section of eTrueBlue: China.

Posted by zzhu at 08:31 PM

March 30, 2010

Professor David Porter's AAS blog


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David Porter is associate professor and associate chair in the Department of English and associate professor of comparative literature at the University of Michigan. Like Professor Gallagher and Professor Lam, he also agreed to guest blog from the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting 2010. We thank Professor Porter for his time and contribution.

---
No visitor to Beijing can fail to be struck by the complexity of modern China's relationship to its past. The razing of traditional hutong neighborhoods alarms those who regret the loss of the connection they provide to the material and social fabric of the city's history. In the suburbs, meanwhile, wealthy home buyers snap up spanking new courtyard homes that mimic Ming and Qing designs and evoke the status and leisured life-style of traditional elites.

The myriad ways historical memory can be repressed, re-used, and re-fashioned emerged as persistent theme at the meeting of the Association for Asian Studies in Philadelphia last weekend. This conference, which was attended by nearly a dozen CCS faculty and staff, featured 282 panels on a vast array of topics ranging from Buddhist poetry to North Korean security threats. Every participant no doubt found different threads to pursue in navigating all these offerings. The speakers at the sessions that caught my eye seemed to turn with remarkable regularity to issues of memory and forgetting.

The first panel I attended, on the role of the public intellectual in 21st-century China, discussed recent novelists and independent film-makers who have been explicitly concerned with problems of historical forgetting. One popular science fiction novel, which many intellectuals view as a thinly veiled parable, begins with the premise that everyone in a particular society has forgotten its recent history. State censorship played a role in this, but one character associated with the security apparatus comments, chillingly, "We could not have done it unless they wanted to forget anyway."

Campaigns of forgetting, panelists argued, have been remarkably successful over the past twenty years in China, obliterating an entire generation's awareness of the tragic events of June 1989, for example, and of the unsurpassed calamities of the Great Leap Forward, in which 36 million died of starvation. A book called Tombstone, published in Hong Kong in 2008, was described as a courageous expose of this disaster. Given the theme of the panel, there was a bitter irony in that one of the scheduled panelists, Cui Weiping of the Beijing Film Academy, had at the last minute been denied permission by the Chinese authorities to attend the conference, apparently in response to her political activism.

A session the following day on historicizing philosophy in China picked up a related theme. According to the panelists, early 20th-century Chinese intellectuals hotly debated the question of whether early Chinese thought constituted "philosophy" in the Western sense, and if it did not, whether one could potentially reconstruct a native foundation for Western logic, metaphysics, and so on from individual classical texts. One key player in this debate, the reform-minded essayist Hu Shi, was so thoroughly persuaded that China didn't have philosophy, didn't need philosophy, and was misguided in its attempts to locate analogues to Western debates in its own history, that he advocated the usefulness of "becoming good at forgetting" in order to cast off the leaden weight of the past and develop new traditions. Amnesia, it would seem, can serve equally well the purposes of those who would advocate as those who would resist reform.

Before I'd had a chance to digest the implications of this paradox, I found myself at a session on the Confucian revival in modern China. The principal theme here was that the historical legacy of Confucianism could be (and is currently being) revived and adapted to serve any number of potentially conflicting purposes. Panelists spoke of a "Rulers' Confucianism," stressing the values of obedience and social harmony, as currently in vogue among the ruling elite. At the same time, the blossoming of a "popular Confucianism" emphasizing the values of family, benevolent government, and righteous rebellion is apparent in popular culture venues including web-based discussions of current events.

In a sense, the current multiplications of the meanings of China's Confucian heritage is an extension of a well-established pattern of ambivalence and regular re-interpretation in the 20th century. One version of the "Confucian tradition" was, of course, a chief target of the May 4th movement in the 1910s. Another provided a foundation for Chiang Kai Shek's New Life Movement in the thirties, with its prescriptions for moral cultivation through adherence to prescribed ways of acting. A third became a target for the Anti-Four-Olds campaign of the Cultural Revolution in the sixties, while a fourth underpinned the restoration of the Confucian temple and cemetery in Qufu as a World Heritage Site in 1994.

The problem of historical memory in modern China, the conference made clear, is far more complex than recent news accounts of the Google controversy might seem to imply. In China as everywhere else, the construction of the present involves both the selection and interpretation of fragments of the past by a variety of players with often conflicting purposes and visions of the future.

Posted by zzhu at 04:53 PM

March 29, 2010

Professor Joseph Lam's AAS blog


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Joseph S.C. Lam is the director of Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan and professor of musicology, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Like Professor Gallagher, he also agreed to guest blog from the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting 2010. We thank Professor Lam for his generosity of time and attention.

---
Attending the first panel organized by a recently graduated UM student of mine, and realizing how well she presented her paper, I suddenly felt a sense of pride, which triggered many AAS memories. I first attended conference in the late 80s, and thus this meeting in Philly was one of many that I attended. Looking at my student, her panelists and one of the discussants who happened to be students of an elder academic brother, I saw their young faces, followed their creative ideas, and felt their scholarly energies. I wonder if I appeared like that to my mentors who attended my first AAS presentations, sitting in the first rows, and providing me with reassurance. Then I missed my mentors and old friends, some of them had passed away, and some could no longer travel. I left the panel with a heart heavy with thoughts about the passing of time and the changing of scholarly generations; there in those long corridors of scholarly, I was unexpectedly greeted by former colleagues and fellow scholars whom I had never met. It was nice to learn that the colleagues were all doing well, advancing their careers, and enjoying their lives--remodeling of their homes, their kids going to utopian colleges; some even had paired up with new spouses/partners. It was also reassuring to learn that fellow scholars still read my old and new publications, and found my theories and facts useful--I am sure some said nice things just to make me feel good, or to start a stimulating conversation! Then, I asked myself if I had been nice to people too? Did I criticize that and that papers too harshly? I knew I did not mean to be harsh--I am a nice guy. With a few poorly chosen words or turns of phrases, however, my questions hurled at the paper presenters could be construed as "unnecessarily harsh," if not hostile! I could only comfort myself by telling myself that I would be more friendly with the other paper presenters--I had to live with my academic faux pas. With such thoughts, I walked past the crowd and through the hotel lobby to the mundane world that unfolded along the streets outside the hotel. Quite a few time, I wanted to stop so that I could greet this or that friends, and to seize the moment. I refrained myself from doing that. I could not and would not stop the academic world from spinning. I would like to see more young and creative scholars taking center stage. I needed fresh air before I could engage with another academic debate.

Posted by zzhu at 04:33 PM

March 27, 2010

CCS Director blogs from the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting


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Mary E. Gallagher is the director of Center for Chinese Studies and associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan. She graciously agreed to guest blog from the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting 2010, currently underway in Philadelphia.

---
My time at AAS was relatively short. I attended the AAS Presidential Address and listened to incoming president Robert Hefner speak on the religious resurgence in Asia. Although I've heard the statistics about China, I didn't realize that the resurgence was so far-reaching and across many different religions. He also mentioned that women and lay people are playing more important roles than in previous movements.

My panel on political fragmentation of the Chinese State with Sida Liu of Wisconsin and Yue Zhang of University of Illinois-Chicago and Lynn White of Princeton University as discussant was surprisingly well-attended given that it started at 8:30 AM. While we all talked about very different issue areas - Sida on the legal profession, Yue on urban preservation, and me on legislative fragmentation - there was some common ground and a good discussion prompted by Lynn's very generous comments.

From there, I went to a panel for Chinese labor law geeks! I love that people are talking about the labor contract law so much. For years I felt like I was the only person paying any attention to any labor law in China (well, that's an exaggeration, but in political science for sure). Actually political scientists are still not talking about it very much. This panel was mostly sociologists and industrial relations specialists. I just have to hang out with a different group.

Lunch was had at the Reading Market with friends from graduate school and "PIP" squeaks from the National Committee on US-China Relations "Public Intellectual Program." It's a program to foster more connections between academics and policymakers on China. I was in the first cohort of PIP-ers from 2005-2007 and they now have a new group. Given the rhetoric in Washington DC on China these days, I wonder if we are having any effect.

In the afternoon, I went to the large social science panel on adaptive authoritarianism organized by Elizabeth Perry and Sebastian Heilmann. They have a book coming out soon on the topic. It was an interesting but frustrating panel. I felt that the discussion was too vague to get a handle on. But I guess that just means I'll have to buy the book....

Posted by zzhu at 11:41 PM

March 24, 2010

Ken Lieberthal talks about the Google fallout



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What does Google’s exit say? What it says publicly is what everyone deeply engaged in China knows privately...

"Stance by China to Limit Google Is Risk by Beijing"
by Michael Wines, The New York Times
03/23/2010

Posted by zzhu at 04:06 PM

U-M Law professor and CCS faculty associate Nicholas Howson interviewed by Bloomberg TV on Rio Tinto and Google



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Please click below to watch the entire "Morning Call" segment.

Posted by zzhu at 09:39 AM

February 25, 2010

Recent articles related to alleged Chinese cyber attacks

* AnnArbor.com: University of Michigan monitoring relationship with Shanghai university tied to Google cyber attacks

* The Atlantic: Cyber Warriors

* BBC: Google hacks not from inside Chinese schools, China says

* The Chronicle of Higher Education: A University and a College in China Draw Attention in Google Hacking Investigation

* Duke Chronicle: SJTU may be linked to attacks on Google

* Michigan Daily: Chinese institute with 'U' ties accused of Google cyber attacks

* New York Times: 2 China schools said to be tied to online attacks

* New York Times: Hacking inquiry puts China's elite in new light

* Wall Street Journal: People's Republic of Hacking

Posted by zzhu at 01:46 PM

February 24, 2010

Latest news from Jidong Yang, Head of U-M Asia Library



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Dear all,

I would like to bring to your attention some of the major digital resources acquired by Asia Library during the last year. You can find links to all the resources below from my resource guide for Chinese studies: http://guides.lib.umich.edu/chinesestudies. The guide contains several tabs (categories). For each of the resources, I shall indicate the tab where you can find it.

1) Chinamaxx Digital Library 中文集献 (under “E-Books”). This is the US version of the Superstar Digital Library 超星数字图书馆, the largest Chinese digital library. The online collection contains millions of titles, most of which are monographs published in the PRC since the 1950s. If you need any e-book from the collection, you can either email the title to me or make a purchase suggestion online. Chinamaxx is especially useful when you are looking for out-of-print Chinese books, serials, and monographic series. For detailed instruction on how to search and use Chinamaxx, see: http://guides.lib.umich.edu/data/files2/57385/Instruction%20Chinamaxx.pdf.

2) Duxiu Knowledge Search 读秀学术搜索 (under “E-Books”). You can think of Duxiu as a Chinese Google Book Search with much better OCR accuracy. It’s a search engine built by Superstar Digital Library on its massive e-book and e-journal collection. It allows you to view up to 50 pages of any search result, which are in most cases more than enough for citation purposes. But if you still need the full-length book after reading the 50 pages, we can purchase it for you and load it to the Chinamaxx site.

3) Chinese Electronic Theses and Dissertations 中文電子學位論文 (under “E-Books”). It contains MA and PhD theses from most Taiwan universities. Many of the theses are available in full-text. Please note that this database only covers Taiwan. If you need MA and PhD theses from mainland China, please use the “Dissertations of China” database (also under “E-Books” tab).

4) Taiwan Electronic Periodical Services 臺灣電子期刊服務網 (under “E-Journals”). Full-text database of most mainstream academic journals published in Taiwan, such as 中央研究院歷史語言研究所集刊, 近代史研究所集刊, 中國大陸研究, 民俗曲藝. Keep in mind, however, you need to input traditional Chinese characters to search in this database, just as you do in the previous database.

5) National Palace Museum Online 故宮缐上 (under “Databases”). It contains digital images of many artifacts collected by the National Palace Museum in Taipei. Categories include paintings, calligraphy, pottery-porcelain, jade, bronze, Buddhist arts, and others.

6) China Law Info 北大法律信息网. The most comprehensive full-text database of PRC laws, regulations, and legal cases. It has two versions: Chinese and English, but the contents and coverage are not exactly the same. When searching in the English version, be careful with those that have a different form in British English, such as centre, labour, etc. Inputting both forms is a good idea.

All the resources listed above are only accessible to U-M users. If you are using them from off-campus locations, please use the links in my resource guide so that your U-M affiliation can be verified. Another way to access the resources from off-campus is to find their bibliographic records in Mirlyn (the library’s online catalog) and then click on the “Available Online” link. All the resources can be retrieved in Mirlyn by their English titles. If you have any questions and need help in using them, please feel free to contact me.

We will continue to build our e-collection. I already have some major items on my radar such as the full-text online version of People’s Daily, but will appreciate your ideas and suggestions on how to spend our money!

Best,
Jidong Yang
Asia Library

Posted by zzhu at 03:15 PM

February 19, 2010

Donald Lopez discusses the Dalai Lama visit on PBS NewsHour



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Please click below to watch entire news segment.

Posted by zzhu at 09:58 AM

February 16, 2010

Happy Year of the Tiger!

The Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan wishes everyone a happy and healthy new year!
密歇根大学中国研究所全体同仁恭祝各位朋友新年虎虎生威、健康快乐!

Survivor - Eye of the Tiger .mp3
Found at bee mp3 search engine

Posted by zzhu at 03:06 PM

January 31, 2010

U-M professor Richard Nisbett focuses on China at Davos



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Sometimes yes means yes; sometimes yes means maybe; and sometimes yes means no.

"Bulls in a China Shop: The East-West Divide"
by Katrin Bennhold, The New York Times/International Herald Tribune Davos Diary
01/28/2010

2010 World Economic Forum Theme: The "Clash of Civilisations" Revisited

Posted by zzhu at 06:51 PM

January 05, 2010

Can Chinese language training make higher education more "relevant"?



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The University of Michigan has seen a 38 percent increase in students enrolling in Asian language courses since 2002, while French has dropped by 5 percent.

"Making College 'Relevant'"
by Kate Zernike, The New York Times
12/29/2009

Posted by zzhu at 04:04 PM

December 23, 2009

The Best of Fall 2009



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Detroit and Beyond:
1. Ross Business School Professor of Strategy and CCS faculty associate Linda Lim explains the Obama administration's new tariff on Chinese tires; Nicholas Lardy and Kenneth Lieberthal shed more light on the issue.

2. U-M auto expert Bruce Belzowski discusses Buick's enduring popularity in China and the rise of the Chinese auto industry.

3. Michigan eyes China as top export market.

Spotlights and Highlights:
4. A U-M researcher finds serious flaws in China's Green Dam software filter and another develops a tool disabling the censorware functionality.

5. A CCS blog "Best of…" honoring Kenneth Lieberthal's retirement.

6. Another first for the CCS blog: Livestream of President Obama's Shanghai town hall.

7. The 2009 CCS Photo Competition – over 100 entries, more than 50 on display and many happy winners.

8. The personal and professional experiences of Bright Sheng, Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition and CCS faculty associate, are in focus.

9. Women of China: revolution and evolution of a magazine - select images from Professor Wang Zheng's CCS noon lecture are now available.

Looking Ahead:
10. Thirty-one courses with significant China-studies content and 16 language courses are scheduled for the Winter 2010 academic term; and the list might grow in coming months.

Posted by zzhu at 02:53 PM

December 11, 2009

CCS director and faculty associate quoted in article about increase of Chinese students at U-M



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If you succeed academically in China, you can break down other barriers of discrimination.

"In line with national trend, more Chinese students studying at 'U'"
by Allie White, The Michigan Daily
12/09/2009

Posted by zzhu at 03:12 AM

November 22, 2009

Xinhua covers Michigan Law professor and CCS faculty associate Nicholas Howson's speech at the annual conference of the Chinese Finance Association



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我们需要改变企业治理结构,加强监管,让企业以长期健康发展为目的,摒弃追逐短期利润的恶习。

"美法律专家呼吁改革华尔街金融业 "
news.xinhuanet.com
11/15/2009

Posted by zzhu at 06:27 PM

November 12, 2009

Ken Lieberthal previews President Obama's first trip to China - PLUS your chance to comment!



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As President Barack Obama prepares to embark on his first trip to China from November 15 to November 18, 2009, Kenneth Lieberthal, Professor Emeritus and director of the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution, took questions about the president's trip in a recent edition of the Brookings Scouting Report.

After reading the complete transcript, you are invited to contribute comments here.

Posted by zzhu at 10:38 PM

November 11, 2009

Michigan eyes China as top export market



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Please click on graphics to read the Detroit News article.

Posted by zzhu at 02:13 PM

November 10, 2009

Ken Lieberthal discusses China and the environment on the Diane Rehm Show



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10am, Thursday, November 5, 2009
China, Coal, and Climate Change

Guest host: Susan Page

China has become the world's leading producer of greenhouse gasses – in large part from burning coal. An update on collaborative efforts between the U.S. and China to reduce coal plant emissions and why they could be key to addressing global climate change.

Guests:

Kenneth Lieberthal, Director, John L. Thornton China Center, The Brookings Institution; Former senior director for Asia at the National Security Council.

Orville Schell, Director, Center on U.S. - China Relations, Asia Society

Bruce Stokes, National Journal, international economics columnist German Marshall Fund, fellow

Posted by zzhu at 04:42 PM

November 04, 2009

CCS faculty associate Bright Sheng's work celebrated in Chinese festival at Carnegie Hall



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"Ancient Paths, Modern Voices: A Festival Celebrating Chinese Culture" will feature work by Bright Sheng, Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Composition and CCS faculty associate.

Bright Sheng's personal and professional experiences are in the spotlight as part of the Carnegie Hall festival's focus on modern Chinese composers and in a recent Wall Street Journal article on the first group of Chinese composers to emerge from the ashes of the Cultural Revolution.

Posted by zzhu at 08:27 AM

CCS and Confucius Institute arts offerings featured on annarbor.com

Prominent Chinese-American community activist and friend of CCS Frances Wang discusses upcoming Chinese music concert and art talks on annarbor.com.

Posted by zzhu at 06:44 AM

October 30, 2009

Grand Opening - Confucius Institute Events - November 5, 2009



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Come and celebrate the grand opening of the Confucius Institute at the University of Michigan, featuring an inaugural lecture entitled "De-familiarizing the Exotic: Appreciating the Arts of China in the 21st Century" by Martin Powers, Sally Michelson Davidson Professor of Chinese Arts and Cultures and CCS faculty associate, as well as an evening of musical performance by the pipa virtuoso Yang Wei and members of the Chinese Ensemble of Renmin University of China.

Please click on poster for additional information.

Posted by zzhu at 12:21 AM

October 23, 2009

Linda Lim explains the tire tariff



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Linda Lim, Strategy Professor, U-M Ross School of Business and CCS faculty associate, sits down for an interview on implications of the new tariff imposed on Chinese tires.

Posted by zzhu at 12:14 AM

October 08, 2009

CCS Alumnus Nicholas Lardy and Professor Emeritus Kenneth Lieberthal talk about new tariffs on Chinese tires



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"Why Obama is taxing Chinese tires"
by Nina Easton, CNNMoney.com
10/08/2009

"U.S.-China leadership can take air out of tire spat"
by Paul Eckert, Reuters
09/14/2009

Posted by zzhu at 01:43 PM

Kenneth Lieberthal discusses China's emergence during global economic crisis



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China is very likely to be the second-most-powerful country — if it isn't now, then within a decade.

"Amid the global economic crisis, China rises"
by Joe McDonald, The Associated Press
10/08/2009

Posted by zzhu at 01:35 PM

September 30, 2009

U-M researcher develops tool to disable Green Dam Youth Censorware functionality



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A security researcher at the University of Michigan has released a tool that helps Chinese computers users disable the censorship functionality of the controversial Green Dam Youth Software.

The Dam Burst utility, created by researcher Jon Oberheide, works by by injecting code into a running application and removing the Green Dam hooks that enable it to monitor and block user activity.

"Hacker ships tool to circumvent China's Green Dam filter"
by Ryan Naraine, ZDNet News
09/29/2009

Posted by zzhu at 06:13 PM

September 24, 2009

Kenneth Lieberthal, Professor Emeritus, is primary author of report critical of Bush's emphasis on daily intelligence brief



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Under President George W. Bush, the President's Daily Brief -- the highly classified intelligence paper delivered each morning to the White House -- rose to "an unprecedented level of importance," with negative consequences for the intelligence community, according to a new study by the Brookings Institution.

"Study Faults Bush's Emphasis On Daily Intelligence Brief"
by Walter Pincus, The Washington Post
09/15/2009

Posted by zzhu at 10:35 PM

September 17, 2009

CCS Blog Tribute to Ken Lieberthal



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Professor Kenneth Lieberthal retired from the University of Michigan in July this year and is now the Director of the John Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution. Not only has Professor Lieberthal been one of the most respected China scholars in the world, but he has also contributed so much to public service as well as to the success of CCS. Readers of the CCS Blog have enjoyed reading or listening to his commentary on various China-related issues and news items in the past year. In order to celebrate all that he has given to CCS and to the study of China, we present "The Best of Ken Lieberthal," bringing together some past blog entries featuring Professor Lieberthal's commentary.

Thanks for being a big part of the CCS Blog, Ken! We look forward to many more blog entries on your work in the future.


Appearance on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, July 27, 2009

Presidential Advisers' panel discussion - "The White House and U.S. Policy Toward China: Views from the Inside", May 1, 2009

Climate change testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, June 4, 2009

China at G20 summit and the Hu-Obama meeting, April 2, 2009

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton Visits China, February 22, 2009

2009 William K. McInally Memorial Lecture, January 28, 2009

Guest appearance on Phoenix TV, Inauguration Day, 2009

Assessing Timothy Geithner's leadership potential in dealing with China, December 19, 2008

On Hua Guofeng, August 21, 2008

Posted by zzhu at 06:08 PM

September 01, 2009

Bruce Belzowski discusses the rise of China's auto industry



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"They're really testing the waters on how to be global companies."

"Red light, green light: China's automotive industry continues to grow, with potential stateside effects"
by Lisa Rummler, ModernMetals.com
09/01/2009

Posted by zzhu at 06:05 PM

August 31, 2009

U-M auto expert Bruce Belzowski discusses Buick's enduring popularity in China



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"It was a status symbol and it stayed that way."

"Buick remains popular with China's upper-middle class"
by Jewel Gopwani and Marcin Szczepanski, Detroit Free Press
08/30/2009

Posted by zzhu at 10:07 AM

August 17, 2009

Kenneth Lieberthal discusses collision of Chinese domestic politics and international business demands



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"They've always looked in the past to what's good for China, and they still do. But for the first time, added to that is the consideration that they're in the position of being rule-makers, not just rule-takers."

"China Warms to New Credo: Business First"
by Michael Wines, The New York Times
08/13/2009

Posted by zzhu at 09:35 PM

CCS Director and Professor of Political Science Mary Gallagher talks to the New York Times about Chinese workers who protest privatization of steel mill



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"Bowing to Protests, China Halts Privatization of Steel Mill"
by Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
08/16/2009

Posted by zzhu at 09:24 PM

August 13, 2009

Michigan Law Professor and CCS Faculty Associate Nicholas Howson comments on Rio Tinto spying charges



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"My sense is that this is the state security bureau running a little amok."

"4 on Rio Tinto's China Staff Won't Face Spying Charge"
by David Barboza, The New York Times
08/12/2009

Posted by zzhu at 12:36 PM

July 29, 2009

Linda Lim discusses China's currency experiment



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"They need a more deeply liquid and diversified capital market, they still need to reform their financial sector, and have more transparency in accounting."

"China takes baby step to reduce dependence on dollar"
by Jeremy Kutner, The Christian Science Monitor
07/28/2009

Posted by zzhu at 11:16 AM

July 28, 2009

Kenneth Lieberthal appears on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer to talk about the new US-China strategic and economic dialogue



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Please click below to watch entire news segment.

Posted by zzhu at 09:44 AM

July 07, 2009

A Morning in Caochangdi (草场地), Beijing

On a gorgeous day in late May, 2009, a group of U-M faculty and staff led by Provost Teresa Sullivan had the pleasure of visiting Caochangdi, one of Beijing’s 300 urban villages where architecture and urban planning students participating in the Michigan Architecture China studio worked and lived during Spring/Summer 2009. First launched about five years ago by Assistant Professor of Architecture and CCS faculty associate Robert Adams, the China studio program is housed in the laboratory space of B.A.S.E. (Beijing Architecture Studio Enterprise) and provides participants an immersive experience intersecting art, architecture and urbanism.

At BASE, members of the group enjoyed meeting many talented and enthusiastic undergraduate and graduate architecture and urban planning students, Professor Adams, as well as the founders of BASE, Centennial Professor of Practice Mary-Ann Ray and Robert Mangurian. After providing an extensive tour of the studio space and a highly informative and fun introduction to the wide range of work taking place there, Professors Ray and Mangurian took the group across the street to the residence and studio of their good friend Ai Weiwei, the pre-eminent Chinese artist and provocateur. Ai was the first among Chinese artists and gallerists to make the move to Caochangdi by designing a compound there for himself, a few friends and a gallery. Nine years later, Caochangdi has become a high-profile hotbed of artistic experimentation. Still buoyed by the creative spirit of BASE, the Michigan group quickly “invaded” Ai’s compound, interacting with Ai and exploring his home and artwork.

The U-M group bid a reluctant goodbye to Caochangdi after additional stops at a migrant workers village, Galerie Urs Meile and a private home also designed by Ai Weiwei.

Pictures from BASE:


Mary Ann Ray, Robert Adams, Ai Weiwei and Robert Mangurian


Mary Gallagher, CCS Director, introduces members of the U-M group to Ai Weiwei


A BASE participant interacts with work by Ai Weiwei

Posted by zzhu at 12:29 AM

June 23, 2009

Artist donates original sketches to CCS office space

Dr. Ren Wendong, Dean of School of Arts & Design, Dalian Polytechnic University, generously donated to the Center for Chinese Studies six of his original sketches of University of Michigan landmarks. A donation ceremony took place Monday, June 22, 2009, at the U-M Institute for the Humanities Gallery, which, along with CCS, co-sponsored an exhibition of Dr. Ren's ink paintings.


Mary Gallagher, CCS director, presents Dr. Ren with a certificate recognizing his gifts


Dr. Ren and his artwork


Dr. Ren and CCS staffer Anna Moyer discuss his paintings

Posted by zzhu at 05:12 PM

June 15, 2009

U-M professor finds flaws in Chinese software filter

Update: Professor Halderman's paper with "Addendum 1: Green Dam Quietly Patched; Still Vulnerable — June 18, 2009" can be found here.

"What we found was only the tip of the iceberg."

"Experts Say Chinese Filter Would Make PCs Vulnerable"
by Andrew Jacobs, The New York Times
06/12/2009

Posted by zzhu at 09:44 AM

June 07, 2009

Chinese Studies faculty and alumna address US-China cooperation on climate change in testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee

Prepared testimonies by Elizabeth Economy and Kenneth Lieberthal on challenges and opportunities for US-China cooperation on climate change, June 4, 2009. Click below to watch video.

Text of testimony by Elizabeth Economy (PhD, Political Science, 1994), C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

Text of testimony by Kenneth Lieberthal, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Political Science, Distinguished Fellow at the William Davidson Institute, William Davidson Professor of Business Administration

Posted by zzhu at 04:54 PM

June 04, 2009

Kenneth Liberthal appears on CCTV News Weekly

Transcript (in Chinese) of CCTV 《新闻周刊》美国智库访谈系列之《李侃如:全球性问题、清洁能源问题和气候变化问题----中美关系的新三大核心问题》 can be found here.

Posted by zzhu at 11:41 AM

May 30, 2009

The "Mad" World of MA Yansong

While in Beijing, the CCS Blogger had exclusive access to MAD, one of the most exciting architecture firms in the world and one of the very few private architecture firms in China. MAD was founded by MA Yansong (马岩松), whose best-known building is perhaps the construction project nicknamed the "Marilyn Monroe Building" in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.

Front door - check out the firm name in faint lettering

Sitting area with MAD-designed furniture

Closer look of the foot rest

Two views of the "Marilyn Monroe Building" are on the right

Posted by zzhu at 11:43 AM

Capturing the CCTV Tower in a Taxi

Shuttling in between meetings and events, the CCS Blogger took a few "drive-by" shots of the famed CCTV Tower.

Just in case you missed it, here's what happened.

Posted by zzhu at 11:17 AM

May 29, 2009

Where in China is the CCS Blogger?

E-mail your answers to Chinese.Studies@umich.edu. The first three individuals who guess all four places correctly will win a special DVD as well as public recognition for knowing China so well.

1. Where is this? Bonus point for knowing the name of the particular area in the city.

2. Name the temple where this statue can be found:

3. In what city did CCSB take this picture?

Another angle:

4. Where can one find this building?

Posted by zzhu at 12:43 PM

May 18, 2009

Not as scary as it looks...

CCS blogger (CCSB) goes to Hong Kong via Tokyo, but first everyone must sit through quarantine inspection. Thankfully, this did not happen to CCSB.


Everyone, sit up straight for the thermal camera.


This man was in charge of collecting health disclosure forms in CCSB's section of the plane. He was polite and diligent. CCSB liked the document box he carried as if a satchel.


Closer view of the box. :)

Posted by zzhu at 10:15 AM

May 04, 2009

Top ten CCS blog entries of the term

Historic Firsts:
1. The first presentation of the Winter 2009 CCS Tuesday Noon Lecture Series: Yiching Wu, "Coping with Crisis in the Wake of the Cultural Revolution: Toward a Historical Critique of China’s Postsocialist Condition," January 20, 2009. Those who attended this talk will not soon forget this day since together they also watched the live broadcast of the inauguration of President Barack Obama right before Professor Wu took to the lectern.

2. On the same day, Kenneth Lieberthal visited Phoenix TV's Washington studio as guest commentator on US-China relations.

3. Learn all about Hillary Clinton's first trip to China as Secretary of State via this blog entry; read about the two major reports (one from The Asia Society and the other from The Brookings Institution) on US-China cooperation on energy and climate change released just prior to this trip. U-M faculty and alumni who wrote or helped to write these reports include Elizabeth Economy, Jan Berris, and Kenneth Lieberthal.

Spotlights and Highlights:
4. Spin the colorful 3-D carousels to browse recent books by CCS faculty.

5. The Chronicle of Higher Education explores US-China academic collaborations on social sciences, and the UM-Peking University Joint Institute's contributions to these efforts are profiled. CCS faculty associates James Lee and Jersey Liang are interviewed.

6. Silk Road Week at U-M and Ann Arbor, March 9-14, 2009.

7. The New York Times interviews China-studies alumna Elizabeth Perry on sensitive anniversaries in China. After reading the article, tell us what you think by taking the CCS poll!

8. Chairman Mao as a political and pop icon - select images from Xiaobing Tang's inaugural lecture as the Helmut F. Stern Professor of Chinese Studies are available on the blog.

Looking Ahead:
9. The 2009 University of Michigan Center for Chinese Studies Photo Competition – Open Competition and Student Competition – check out our biggest prize offerings yet!

10. Twenty-seven courses with significant China-studies content and 13 Chinese-language courses are scheduled for the Fall 2009 academic term; and the list might grow in coming months. See the list of exciting courses, including "Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture - The Story of the Stone," "China from the Oracle Bones to the Opium War," "China's Evolution Under Communism," and "Business in Asia." A selection of course flier can be found throughout the CCS blog.

Posted by zzhu at 12:33 PM

April 28, 2009

Great News - Yu Xie now a member of National Academy of Sciences!



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Click for details.

Posted by kanepark at 02:30 PM

April 20, 2009

Kenneth Lieberthal talks to Southern Weekend (南方周末) about climate change cooperation



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"中国在美国关于全球暖化的政治对话中的突出地位最少可向前追溯十余年。"

“我们面临一个历史机会”——美国著名中国问题专家李侃如谈中美气候合作
南方周末记者 余力
03/04/2009

Posted by zzhu at 06:23 PM

April 07, 2009

Fall 2009 China Courses, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

China-content courses (undergraduate and graduate levels):
• Chinese Society and Cultures
• Introduction to Buddhism
• Introduction to the Study of Asian Cultures
• Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture - The Story of the Stone
• Introduction to Chinese Civilization
• The Pursuit of Happiness in the Chinese Tradition
• Topics in Asian Studies - Narratives of Desire by Modern Chinese Women Writers
• Seminar in Chinese Poetry - Introduction to Chinese Poetry from the Earliest Times through the 12th-Century
• A Comparative Study of Asia
• Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
• Independent Study in Chinese Studies
• Master's Thesis in Chinese Studies
• Ancient Languages and Scripts
• Comparative Literary Movements and Periods – Regarding China
• Painting and Poetry in China
• Special Topics - Art and Authoritarianism
• Special Studies in the Art of China - The Twentieth Century Response to Theories of Artistic Expression in China
• The Writing of History - Good Sons, Good Daughters: Filial Piety (xiao) in Early China
• East Asia: Early Transformations
• China from the Oracle Bones to the Opium War
• History Colloquium – Confucianism, Mohism, and Legalism and the Rise of the Chinese Empire
• Introduction to the Comparative Study of History
• Honors Social Sciences Seminar – Forces Shaping the Future International System
• China’s Evolution Under Communism
• Democratization in Global Perspectives
• The World Economy
• Business in Asia
• China's International Relations
• China: Early 21st Century Ruralopolitan Space

Fall 2009 Chinese Language Courses
• First Year Chinese I
• First Year Chinese for Mandarin Speakers
• First Year Tibetan I
• Second Year Chinese I
• Second Year Chinese for Mandarin Speaker
• Third Year Chinese I
• Third Year Chinese for Mandarin Speakers
• Advanced Spoken Chinese I
• Mandarin for Cantonese Speakers I
• Fourth Year Chinese I
• Chinese for Professions I
• Academic Chinese I
• Literary Chinese I

Posted by zzhu at 04:42 PM

April 02, 2009

Kenneth Lieberthal discusses China at G20 summit and the Hu-Obama meeting



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"They are beginning to appreciate that when countries emerge from this current economic crisis, China is likely to be either the first to emerge or right after the U.S., and that China will be one of the very few countries at the end of this crisis to emerge without having high levels of government debt."

"An Unsure China Steps Onto the Global Stage"
by Michael Wines and Edward Wong, The New York Times
04/02/2009


"The two sides agreed to cooperate in a set of areas and they characterized U.S.-China relationship as positive, cooperative and comprehensive going forward."

"U.S. scholar says China-U.S. meeting was forward-looking"
by Yan Feng, Xinhua News
04/02/2009

Posted by zzhu at 10:32 AM

March 25, 2009

China's top business and finance magazine blogs about Ken Lieberthal's work on US-China environmental cooperation

Please click on image to go to Web page. The blog entry is written in Chinese.

Posted by zzhu at 02:49 PM

March 10, 2009

Alumna comments on sensitive anniversaries in China

"There is ample precedent in the republican as well as communist periods for Chinese protesters to turn the commemoration of political anniversaries into demands for political change."
- Elizabeth J. Perry (PhD 1978), Professor of Government and Director of Harvard-Yenching Institute, Harvard University

"Symbolic Dates Have China on Edge"
by Michael Wines, The New York Times
03/09/2009








Quizzes by Quibblo.com

Posted by zzhu at 06:14 PM

March 05, 2009

China studies alumnus to participate in panel during U.S. Senate celebration

Nicholas Lardy (PhD 1975), a prominent China scholar, will participate in a March 18 discussion panel at the U.S. Senate, in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Higher Education Act-Title VI & Fulbright-Hays International Education Programs.

The panel, entitled "The Global Financial Crisis and Consequences for China, Russia, and their Regions: Implications for the U.S.," is part of the Global Symposium on Critical Challenges in an Unpredictable World: Implications for U.S. Engagement. Other speakers include Lee Hamilton and Zbigniew Brzezinski.

Posted by zzhu at 04:49 PM

March 04, 2009

Follow us on Twitter - get CCS event updates and reminders on your cell phone!

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

Posted by zzhu at 04:44 PM

February 26, 2009

Ken Lieberthal comments on Hillary Clinton's trip to Asia

"The Obama administration feels that Bush followed too narrow and parsimonious an agenda with Asia."

"Clinton 'reintroduces' US to Asia"
by Peter Ford, The Christian Science Monitor
02/23/2009

Posted by zzhu at 07:08 PM

February 10, 2009

Chronicle of Higher Education article discusses UM-Peking University Joint Institute, with quotes from CCS faculty associates James Lee and Jersey Liang

"There is tremendous potential and tremendous problems" in China, says James Z. Lee, a University of Michigan historian and sociologist who is one of the directors of the Beijing institute. "There are so many reasons that the social sciences make sense as a line of academic inquiry."

"Renewed Attention to Social Sciences in China Leads to New Partnerships With American Universities"
by Mara Hvistendahl, Chronicle of Higher Education
02/10/2009

Rising up from the eastern edge of Peking University's campus, the sleek, U-shaped Leo KoGuan Building wraps around a red Qing-dynasty edifice. The result of a record-breaking donation from a Singaporean tycoon, this merger of old and new marks a departure from the drab socialist architecture so common in China.

But the building is more remarkable for what's inside.

In lecture halls bathed in natural light, students take intensive one-month courses from leading academics from the United States — although not in disciplines where American colleges have an established presence in China, such as business and technology. Instead the students are taking courses in the social sciences.

The University of Michigan-Peking University Joint Institute, as the program is called, offers courses in relatively new subjects, such as religion and psycholinguistics, in an effort to turn out top Chinese sociologists, demographers, and other social scientists.

"There aren't many professors who can teach these subjects in China," says Wang Linlan, a graduate student who took feminist theory and data analysis at the institute, then applied the credits toward a sociology doctorate at Peking University. "This kind of opportunity is rare."

Politics and a lack of money resulted in decades of neglect for the social sciences in China, by foreign and domestic institutions alike. American universities looking to establish partnerships here have focused instead on high-demand fields like finance and the hard sciences.

But societal change, along with a government push to develop more comprehensive universities, is sparking a proliferation of new partnerships in a variety of fields, including sociology, education, and social work.

The Chinese government "wants to directly import some very high-level academicians to develop world-class research," says Ailei Xie, an education scholar at the University of Hong Kong who tracks international partnerships on the mainland. "That's a good opportunity for universities and colleges in America who want to set up in China."

These partnerships, which are mostly new and small in scale, bring immediate benefits to both partners. Chinese academics find the expertise needed to quickly develop these fields. American academics, in turn, gain valuable research opportunities.

"There is tremendous potential and tremendous problems" in China, says James Z. Lee, a University of Michigan historian and sociologist who is one of the directors of the Beijing institute. "There are so many reasons that the social sciences make sense as a line of academic inquiry."

Increasingly, influential Chinese figures agree. A private Chinese donor allows Mr. Lee's institute to enroll about 300 students every summer, most of them on full scholarship.

But setting up a program under a government that censors academic research can be tricky. Some social scientists say politics impedes their work in China. Others say the Chinese education system's emphasis on test scores and rote learning is poorly suited to disciplines that prize independent thinking and analysis — although that is exactly what the American programs seek to change.

The People's Science

A short walk from the University of Michigan institute, Ren Qiang works out of an office that represents the old standing of the social sciences in China. The heat doesn't work. The elevator is broken, a chair propped against it to deter passengers. Mr. Ren shares a room with three other professors from the Peking University sociology department. "This is the worst building on campus," he laughs.

As one of China's leading demographers, Mr. Ren is thriving despite the poor conditions. He teaches alongside American professors at the University of Michigan joint institute. Last year a grant from the National Institutes of the Health allowed him to spend a semester in Ann Arbor.

In pre-revolution China, by comparison, sociology was tainted by amateurism.

"Under our traditional method of practicing sociology, it was like a people's science," Mr. Ren says. "If you had an opinion, you could write an article."

The discipline's reputation as a public sounding board didn't help it after the Communist Revolution. Sociology — along with political science, demography, and other social sciences — was banned outright starting in the early 1950s. They were reinstated when universities reopened in the late 1970s, gaining a boost from the establishment of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in 1977.

Even so, the social sciences remained neglected throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Chinese sociologists and demographers depended on grants from the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the United Nations Population Fund to stay afloat. The first social-work courses were introduced only in 1987.

Today, China's 40-odd Sino-American joint-degree programs are concentrated in the hard sciences and business. But institutional research partnerships and exchanges in the social sciences, along with cooperation among individual professors, are growing, says Mr. Xie. "Nowadays, China wants to set up new schools in education and the social sciences," he says.

One reason for the increased interest derives from the government's determination to transform China's universities into world-class institutions. Government officials believe the solution lies in broadening universities' scope of research beyond the natural sciences.

"They've found that the top universities in America are comprehensive," Mr. Xie says.

Changes in Chinese society have also helped drive the expansion of social-science programs. After two decades of fast-paced growth, President Hu Jintao's "harmonious society" program aims to develop China's countryside, improve the social-service system, and reduce the gap between rich and poor.

Social scientists say it's about time. Under socialism, state-run organizations and work units provided basic social services. Now, as China transitions to a free-market economy, many Chinese have to fend for themselves.

"So many areas need service — elderly services, family services, services for migrant workers, you name it," says Agnes Law, a social-work professor from Hong Kong who helped establish a social-work degree program at Sun Yat-sen University, in Guangzhou. "There's a huge vacuum."

Leading the Way

As one of China's top higher-education institutions, Peking University established some of the first social-science departments and was quick to revive them after the Cultural Revolution.

It continues to be a leader in the advancement of the social sciences. The same year it began collaborating with the University of Michigan, the university brokered a wide-ranging partnership with the University of Southern California.

That partnership grew out of a consortium, created in 2006, of social-science deans from Southern California who were interested in working in China. The deans toured China, hoping to pool their efforts by forming a partnership with one Chinese university across a range of social-science disciplines. It was an unusual goal for a foreign university in China, but Southern California administrators found a number of potential collaborators.

Ultimately, they settled on Peking University because of its size, reputation, and tradition of social-science inquiry. The two institutions signed a memorandum of understanding that covers gerontology and policy planning as well as social work and education. The hope is that faculty and student exchanges will evolve into dual-degree programs and sustained research projects.

One of the first fruits of the partnership will be a Peking University master's program in student-affairs education. Chinese students once found little support on campus in dealing with mental-health problems or seeking out extracurricular activities.

Now, as universities begin competing for students and capital, student services is emerging as an important selling point, creating a demand for degree programs for this new field.

"Student-affairs professionals in China really have to learn by doing," says Mark Robison, director of the Asia-Pacific Rim program at USC's Rossier School of Education, who has been involved in the partnership. "They have no base to work from."

Rossier has already sent two professors to teach courses at Peking University. Now it will assist in the development of a homegrown program. Administrators are separately looking into setting up a doctor-of-education program for university administrators in China.

An Identity Crisis

But setting up partnerships has come with its share of challenges.

The University of Denver's Graduate School of Social Work has been working in China since the 1990s.

On a trip to Beijing in 1993, then-dean Jack Jones asked offhandedly about social-work education in China. His hosts directed him to China Youth University for Political Sciences, which had just set up one of the country's first departments and was eager for help.

Denver began sending English teaching materials and delegations of professors and students to the campus, in part because China lacked its own social-work textbooks until recently.

The Chinese university supplemented the English materials with books from Hong Kong and Taiwan, printed in traditional characters, which can be difficult for mainland students to read. (New textbooks with simplified characters were not published until 2004.)

"There are problems finding faculty, problems finding textbooks, problems with field practice," says Xiaojun Tong, assistant dean of the Chinese university's social-work program, who earned her doctorate at Denver.

But one of the university's most fundamental problems has been identifying the social workers — and sociologists and educators — of tomorrow.

Students rank their choice of major on the university entrance examinations, then are selected based on test scores. That means popular majors like finance and law attract the best students, while mediocre students are assigned majors — often in the social sciences.

At orientation, Ms. Tong says, China's future social workers are full of questions. Are there jobs in social work? If they find work, how much money will they make?

The most common question, though, speaks to the gargantuan task before educators hoping to mold a new generation of scholars and professionals, she says: "They want to know, what is social work?"

But while problems with attracting students and developing a quality curriculum are just growing pains, limits on academic freedom may remain an issue in the social sciences for years to come.

Jersey Liang, for example, is a gerontologist whose work in China extends back to 1984, when he joined a National Academy of Sciences delegation in sociology and anthropology.

Over the next few decades, Mr. Liang, now a research professor in the University of Michigan's School of Public Health, established several longstanding partnerships — including setting up a program, independent of his university's joint institute, to bring American scholars to China for short courses.

Mr. Liang's research focuses on aging and health, an area of pressing need in China, which has a rapidly graying population. But today he says he has "serious reservations" about the government's higher-education policy.

He recalls setting up conferences in the 1990s, only to be notified a few days beforehand informing him the event had to be canceled, presumably because of political concerns.

In the past few years, research topics that were once off-limits — including social unrest, China's one-child policy, and AIDS — have become fair game for social scientists. But keeping track of government policy remains difficult, Mr. Liang says. "There's a lot of uncertainty. You have to be politically astute and be very sensitive to which way the wind blows."

Social-work educators, meanwhile, say Chinese government control of nongovernmental organizations inhibits the profession's development, preventing graduates from practicing the principles they're taught.

"Most of the NGO's have a close relationship with the government, but few of them have a good idea what social work is," says Ms. Law, the professor from Hong Kong.

Still, scholars agree that attention to the social sciences is growing in China. A separate government campaign to develop a general-education curriculum in Chinese colleges — requiring students to take courses outside their majors — may be a boon for the discipline.

Mr. Liang still works in China, although these days he prefers partnerships with individual researchers rather than with institutions.

His colleagues at the University of Michigan are more hopeful. In 2007 the university's joint institute offered courses in Chinese history and society — perhaps the most sensitive areas of all on the mainland.

In a seminar on interdisciplinary Chinese studies, Mr. Lee, the co-director, says he covered a number of prickly issues: "Migrants, stratification, ethnicity, gender. I taught the exact same class I taught in Ann Arbor."

That he was allowed to do so suggests that the social sciences in China may have a meaningful future.
http://chronicle.com
Section: International
Volume 55, Issue 23, Page A35

Posted by zzhu at 03:17 PM

February 06, 2009

Faculty and alumni contribute to major US-China climate change reports

Asia Society Task Force Report (January 2009): Common Challenge, Collaborative Response: A Roadmap for U.S.-China Cooperation on Energy and Climate Change

Contributors include:
Jan Berris (Center for Chinese Studies MA, 1967)
Elizabeth Economy (PhD, Political Science, 1994)
Kenneth Lieberthal, Professor of Political Science and Business Administration


Brookings Institution Report (January 2009): Overcoming Obstacles to U.S.-China Cooperation on Climate Change
by Kenneth Lieberthal and David Sandalow (JD, Michigan Law, 1982)


Two New York Times articles about these reports:
"Experts in U.S. and China See a Chance for Cooperation Against Climate Change"

First Trip for Clinton Aims at China, Climate

Posted by zzhu at 08:08 AM

January 24, 2009

A shaky start to US-China relations under Obama? Ken Lieberthal talks to the New York Times.

"The Chinese are probably one of the few people in the world who were sorry to see President Bush go, and are nervous about his successor."

"China Jittery about Obama Amid Signs of Harder Line"
by Mark Landler, The New York Times
01/24/2009

Posted by zzhu at 10:27 AM

January 21, 2009

Kenneth Lieberthal a guest on Phoenix TV, discusses Obama and US-China relations

Please click below to see program.

Posted by zzhu at 11:58 AM

January 13, 2009

Distinguished University Professorship Lecture - Donald Lopez, 01/28/09

Posted by zzhu at 04:16 PM

January 08, 2009

Recent Books by CCS Faculty

Posted by zzhu at 04:38 AM

January 06, 2009

CCS alumnus writes about China for slate.com

Damien Ma, CCS MA '07 and a Washington, D.C.-based China analyst at the Eurasia Group, a global political risk research and consulting firm, talks about the prospect for democracy in China on slate.com.

Posted by zzhu at 01:08 PM

December 19, 2008

Kenneth Lieberthal on China and the global economic downturn

"They are always concerned about job creation."

"China, an Engine of Growth, Faces a Global Slump"
by Jim Yardley and Keith Bradsher, The New York Times
10/22/2008

Posted by zzhu at 02:57 PM

Kenneth Lieberthal assesses Timothy Geithner's leadership potential in dealing with China

"One possibility is that the strategic economic dialogue continues, but moves to another venue in the government."

"Treasury's Lead Role in China in Flux"
by Mark Landler, The New York Times
12/01/2008

Posted by zzhu at 02:35 PM

December 15, 2008

The Ann Arbor News covers the U-M China Task Force final report

"University of Michigan mulls China office"
by Dave Gershman, The Ann Arbor News
12/12/2008

Posted by zzhu at 11:27 AM

December 09, 2008

China Task Force Final Report Released

The University of Michigan President's Task Force on China, whose members include Mary Gallagher, CCS Director, and several CCS faculty associates, has made a number of recommendations in a new report.

To read more about the Task Force, its report, and a summary of the recommendations, please see article in the latest issue of The Record.

Click on the report cover to download the full report.

Posted by zzhu at 01:23 PM

December 04, 2008

CCS MA/MBA student's ride-sharing business heats up during the holidays

Jason Lin, current CCS MA/MBA student, is making a name for himself as CEO and President of Hitchsters.com, an online service that matches travelers for shared (thus, more affordable) rides to major airports. Recently, Jason was interviewed by The San Francisco Examiner about his increasingly popular business.

Posted by zzhu at 07:34 PM

Winter 2009 China Courses, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

China-content courses (undergraduate and graduate level):
• Early Civilizations
• Globalizing Consumer Cultures
• Image-Based Ethnography
• Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators - Empire and Nation in Asia
• Modern East Asia
• Introduction to the Study of Asian Religions
• Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism
• Introduction to the Study of Asian Cultures
• Modern China and Its “Others?
• Arts & Letters of China
• Topics in Asian Studies: East Asian Horror Films
• Acupuncture: Historical and Contemporary Transformations
• Law & Society in China
• China's Evolution Under Communism
• Interpreting the Zhuangzi
• Seminar in Chinese Drama - The Peony Pavilion Old and New: The Politics of Cross-Cultural Theater (and Fiction)
• Legal Strategy for IPR Protection in China
• The World Economy
• China Humanistic Studies
• Independent Study – China
• Master's Thesis in Chinese Studies
• Seminar in Journalistic Performance
• The Chinese Renaissance: Cultural Transformations in Eleventh-Century China
• Imperial China: Ideas, Men, and Society
• Seminar: Studies in Late Imperial China
• The Chinese Corporation
• Intro to World Music
• Special Course – Kunqu
• Approaches to Chinese Landscape Painting
• The Bildungsroman in Modern East Asia

Language courses:
• First-year Chinese II
• Second-year Chinese II
• Reading and Writing Chinese II
• Mandarin Pronunciation
• Third-year Chinese II
• Advanced Spoken Chinese II
• Mandarin for Cantonese Speakers II
• Media Chinese I
• Fourth-year Chinese I
• Chinese for the Professions II
• Readings in Modern Chinese Society and Culture
• Literary Chinese II

Posted by zzhu at 03:53 PM

November 19, 2008

Mary-Ann Ray, Professor of Architecture, winner of 2008–2009 James Stirling Memorial Lecture on the City Competition for "Caochangdi: Beijing Inside Out"

Robert Mangurian and Mary-Ann Ray will develop their research project on issues of urban-rural development in China and present the Stirling Lecture in autumn 2008 at the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montréal, and at the London School of Economics in autumn 2009.

Please click on image for press release.

Posted by zzhu at 01:31 PM

November 14, 2008

Mary Gallagher on Chinese workers' plight in midst of export slowdown

"Increasingly, the migrant workers know their rights."

"Factories Shut, China Workers Are Suffering"
by Edward Wong, The New York Times
11/13/2008

Posted by zzhu at 12:55 AM

November 12, 2008

Linda Lim in Ross School's Dividend Alumni Magazine

In the latest issue of U-M Ross School of Business's Dividend Alumni Magazine, Linda Lim, Professor of Strategy and CCS Faculty Associate, talks about global trade liberalization and visits with alumni in Shanghai (including CCS MA/MBA grad Wm. Patrick Cranley) and in Kuala Lumpur. Click on photo for the entire issue. (Linda Lim appears on pages 36-37, and page 51, among others.)

Posted by zzhu at 05:11 PM

November 08, 2008

Robert Adams exhibits at Architectural Biennial Beijing

Robert Adams, Assistant Professor of Architecture and CCS faculty associate, is exhibiting his recent research focused on architecture and material culture in contemporary China at the 3rd Architectural Biennial Beijing (ABB). The exhibit has been on display from mid-October until November 12. ABB is located at Beijing Design Park.751, a former factory in the Dashanzi 798 complex that is a thriving arts/design district in the city. The work includes Adams' research on architecture and urbanization in China with an emphasis on new media, construction culture, and infrastructure. He also presented a lecture at the ABB. The theme for the ABB is "Ecological City/Building."

Posted by zzhu at 07:28 PM

November 07, 2008

Nico Howson, Assistant Professor of Law, reviews 《公主之死——你所?知?的中国法律?》


"儒家化之死?"
by Nico Howson, Oriental Morning Post (东方早报)
11/02/2008

Posted by zzhu at 11:34 AM

November 04, 2008

Mary Gallagher on cab driver strike in China

"There has been an increase in labor conflict broadly speaking, and that includes lawsuits as well as strikes."

"Cab Drivers Stage Strike in China City"
by Sky Canaves, The Wall Street Journal
11/04/2008

Posted by zzhu at 01:36 PM

October 13, 2008

Shedding light on the factors

"Huge current account surpluses built up in Asia and other countries after the 1997-98 financial crisis funded huge US budget and current account deficits ushered in by the election of President George W. Bush in 2000."

Linda Lim, for The Straits Times (Singapore)
10/13/2008

Shedding light on the factors

How did things get so bad so fast? Truth is, the current global financial crisis was a long time coming.

Huge current account surpluses built up in Asia and other countries after the 1997-98 financial crisis funded huge US budget and current account deficits ushered in by the election of President George W. Bush in 2000.

Aided by a Republican Congress until the 2006 mid-term elections, the Bush administration embarked on expensive foreign wars and chalked up large domestic expenditure without requiring Americans to pay for them.

Instead, foreign borrowing allowed taxes to be cut while the Federal Reserve under Mr Alan Greenspan kept interest rates too low for too long, which, added to foreign capital inflows, made cheap money available to all. Not surprisingly, personal savings rate fell to below zero, stocks boomed and an asset bubble developed, most notably in the housing market.

Believing that housing values would not fall, Americans bought more expensive houses. Some invested in multiple properties with borrowed money, a major reason for the excess supply now weighing on the housing market's recovery.

Home equity loans also enabled Americans to borrow against the rising value of their homes for current consumption. Economists call this a 'positive wealth effect'. People spend more as their assets rise in value even if their real incomes stagnate or decline, as they have done for more than 96 per cent of US workers since 2000.

At the same time, a US administration preaching free-market principles while practising fiscal profligacy pursued an agenda of financial (and other) deregulation. This encouraged the 'financial innovation' that gave us sub-prime mortgages, collateralised debt obligations, credit default swaps and other complex instruments, not to mention the amazingly high leverage ratios and risk tolerance that came along with them.

It is this house of cards that has now come crashing down, dragging the whole world economy with it.

Could all this have been predicted? It was - by many, including my University of Michigan colleague, the late Edward Gramlich, a Fed governor from 1997 to 2005. He repeatedly and unsuccessfully tried to persuade Fed chairman Greenspan to crack down on excessive and predatory mortgage lending practices.

But predictable and predicted though it was, the crash, when it came, was precipitated by a coincidence of factors that produced a 'perfect storm'. The debt-fuelled US economic boom caused the current account deficit (the excess of exports over imports) to balloon to nearly 7 per cent of GDP by 2006. This exerted continuous downward pressure on the US dollar and foreign creditors found better outlets for their surplus funds elsewhere - in Europe as well as in emerging markets whose own export-led boom was itself partly the result of insatiable US appetite for imports.

The depreciating dollar and rising commodity prices increased US inflation, requiring the Federal Reserve, as well as other central banks, to accelerate raising interest rates in 2006, even as the US economy was beginning to slow down.

Soaring oil prices in the past two years aggravated nervousness about the economy. Oil-dependent sectors such as auto makers, airlines and tourism were badly hit and began laying off people. And some sub-prime mortgage holders with adjustable rate mortgages found themselves unable to service their mortgages at the higher rates.

While the proportion of such defaulting sub-prime mortgages was small, they had been packaged together with 'regular' mortgages in mortgage-backed securities. Rated as low-risk securities, they had been issued, distributed, insured and held by many blue-chip financial institutions. Greed too often trumped prudence in these largely unregulated private-market transactions.

As the defaults began, uncertainty about the riskiness of individual securities rose. The lack of transparency and the lack of understanding of the securities themselves led to a 're-pricing of risk' and a brutal downward spiral of 'de-leveraging'.

Financial institutions, fearful that they may be holding unacceptably risky assets, began unloading them into increasingly illiquid markets, while 'mark-to-market' accounting rules rapidly eroded balance sheets and capital bases. This forced the afflicted institutions to raise more capital. In the end, capital simply dried up as investors were unwilling to throw good money after bad, not knowing what they were buying.

Thus ensued the current vicious global credit crunch. Banks are no longer willing to lend to each other, due to a lack of trust. If banks cannot get credit from each other, neither can corporations and households. Eventually, various sectors grind to a halt as credit transactions evaporate.

In this environment, the policy actions and inactions of the US government, including its flawed public communications, not only failed to reassure markets, but also injected a further sense of panic. Savings withdrawals and investment redemptions contributed to bank failures and plunging stock prices.

Ideological objections from both the left and right to 'government bailouts' as well as a lack of understanding by a furious electorate on the verge of a momentous presidential election further heightened overall uncertainty. And thus we had a perfect storm.

The writer is professor of strategy, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

Posted by zzhu at 03:40 PM

October 03, 2008

New publication by CCS faculty - Linda Lim

Posted by zzhu at 03:26 PM

September 16, 2008

U-M China Initiatives in the Spotlight

"We've done a few surveys and for many of (the U-M students) it's their first time traveling overseas and to have China be that destination is quite an eye-opening experience."

Mary Sue Coleman extends University of Michigan's global role
by Dave Gershman, The Ann Arbor News
08/28/2008

Posted by zzhu at 10:43 AM

August 21, 2008

Ken Lieberthal on Hua Guofeng

"He succeeded Mao briefly because he was a guy nobody felt could dominate, so he didn’t set off alarm bells in any camp."

"Hua Guofeng, Transitional Leader of China After Mao, Is Dead at 87"
by Keith Bradsher and William J. Wellman, The New York Times
08/20/2008

Posted by zzhu at 10:58 AM

August 15, 2008

CCS Associate Guoqi Xu in the spotlight for writing on the Olympics

"If Chinese continue to be obsessed with soccer, they’ll definitely demand something dramatic, something political or involving rule of law. It will start with sports, and then it will move onto something bigger."

"China Loves Its Soccer. Its Team? Don't Ask."
by Edward Wong, The New York Times
08/15/2008

"A nation that obsesses over gold medals is not a self-assured nation."

"China's Agony of Defeat"
It's impossible to understand what the Games mean to the Chinese without understanding their history of humiliation.
by Orville Schell, Newsweek
Published 07/26/2008
From the magazine issue dated Aug 4, 2008

Posted by zzhu at 04:12 PM

Ken Lieberthal comments on the "picture perfect" Olympics opening ceremony

"Fundamentally, the Chinese press and leadership are seeking to make the Games come across as perfect as they can."

"Image control, Beijing style"
Feign perfection by hiding imperfection
by Calum MacLeod and Kevin Johnson, USA Today
08/14/2008

Posted by zzhu at 12:31 PM