November 14, 2013

CFP: THE SEDUCTIONS OF PROGRESS: CONCEPTUAL AND PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO CHANGE IN EAST EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA

Deadline:December 6, 11:59 PM EST

GRADUATE CONFERENCE CALL FOR PAPERS
11th Annual Conference of the Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia, University of Pittsburgh
“THE SEDUCTIONS OF PROGRESS: CONCEPTUAL AND PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO CHANGE IN EAST EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA”
February 21-23, 2014 University of Pittsburgh Main Campus
Featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Małgorzata Fidelis Department of History, University of Illinois at Chicago

Change and calls for change are constants in the region of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. The Bolshevik Revolution, the annus mirabilis of 1989, color revolutions and the drive towards EU membership - all were, at least in their time, viewed as massive upheavals which, for many, promised to bring better days. Today, public discourses throughout the region are replete with themes of change: Changes in existing values to more "progressive" ones, regime change in semi-authoritarian states, "modernization" of economies, bureaucracies, political parties, societies and social structures. Wherever one looks in the history of our region, change has come, change is underway, or change is on the horizon, and the promises of change slip ever so easily from the tongues of the status quo's latest opponents.

The theme for this year's conference challenges participants to consider how change, and its antipode stasis, is manifested and/or interpreted in our region. Such a broad theme can easily accommodate nearly any discipline and methodological approach. In addition to research dealing with specific examples of change, we also welcome work which critically examines how the concepts of change, progress, reform, transition and transformation (to name a few change-related terms) have been used in our part of the world. We invite graduate students from all academic and professional disciplines to submit their latest work on the topic of “change,” broadly defined.

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS AND APPLICATIONS: Friday, December 6, 11:59 PM EST. Accepted panelists will be notified by January 1, 2014.

One page, double-spaced abstracts of no more than 300 words must be submitted through the GOSECA Website Submission Form at: http://goseca.ucis.pitt.edu/submissions-form

There will be a $25 conference registration fee (payable onsite) to cover the cost of catering and conference administration.
For further information, please contact info.goseca@gmail.com

Posted by sarayu at 01:02 PM | Comments (0)

November 12, 2013

CFP: Paradise Found, or Paradise Lost? Nostalgia, Culture and Identity in Central and Eastern Europe (May 29-30, 2014, Paris)

Deadline: January 31, 2014​

Call for Papers

Paradise Found, or Paradise Lost? Nostalgia, Culture and Identity in Central and Eastern Europe”

May 29-30, 2014

https://afrabricuru.u-paris10.fr/?p=200

24th Conference of the British-­‐French Association for the Study of Russian Culture /
Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense

Salle des Conférences, Bâtiment B

Organised by / Organisateurs : Dr Graham ROBERTS and Dr Anna LOUYEST
(Centre de Recherches Pluridiscilplinaires Multilingues, EA 4481, http://crpm.u-­‐paris10.fr)

The end of Communism in the USSR and its satellite states produced a wave of collective euphoria that had not been seen in Europe since May 1945. Nowhere was this feeling stronger than in the former socialist countries themselves, where many felt that normal service had, as it were, been resumed. As former Czech dissident Vaclav Havel put it at the time, ‘after decades of following the wrong track, we are yearning to rejoin the road which was one ours too.’ Signs that things were ‘returning to normal’ were everywhere: West Germans received their Ossi neighbours back into the fold by giving each of them 100 West-­‐deutschmarks as so-­‐called
‘welcome money’; Hungarians could once again sit alongside their Austrian cousins and thrill to La Traviata at the Vienna Opera; and Muscovites finally got to taste their first Big Mac. The Socialist dream had been cancelled, but in its place there was to be another utopia, a consumerist paradise, buttressed by liberal democracy at home, and lasting peace abroad.

Barely two decades later, there is, to paraphrase Marx and Engels, a new spectre haunting Central and Eastern Europe – the spectre of nostalgia. Perhaps this should not surprise us. As Svetlana Boym recently put it, in her book The Future of Nostalgia, ‘nostalgia inevitably appears as a defense mechanism in a time of accelerated rhythms of life and historical upheavals.’ At one time this feeling was limited to émigrés fondly reminiscing about their distant mother country. Now, however, it also appears to touch those who live where they always have, but whose homeland no longer officially exists.

This new nostalgia takes an astonishingly wide variety of forms. These include the popularity among Berlin shoppers of the Ostpaket (East German products in their original packaging), the reaffirmation of stereotypical gender roles in Russian ‘glamour culture’, the rise of nationalism in countries such as Hungary and the Czech Republic, and the rehabilitation of long-­‐forgotten artists or literary genres. This tendency to look at the past through rose-­‐tinted spectacles can also be seen in numerous published collections of Soviet photographs of the 1970s (Optimizm pamjati, Leningrad 70-­‐x), or on countless social media sites, both institutional and personal. While in the main, Oushakine (2007) is right to argue that this new kind of nostalgia does not aim at political restoration, there is often an important political subtext.

This conference aims to explore the many different forms nostalgia has taken in Central and Eastern Europe since in the last twenty years. Among the questions to be addressed are: What are the distinctive forms of nostalgia in the region? Where does this nostalgia come from? What purpose(s) does it serve? What, if any, is its political agenda? Is nostalgia primarily a yearning for or a rejection of something? Whose nostalgia is it anyway? What is the relationship between nostalgia and kitsch? And how seriously does this nostalgia take itself? Papers are invited from scholars working in a broad range of disciplines, including Slavonic and East European Studies, politics, economics, anthropology, law, business studies, linguistics, history and comparative literature.

Proposals, in the form of a 250-­‐word abstract and a short cv, should be sent BY 31 JANUARY
​ ​
2014 AT THE LATEST, to BOTH organisers, at: groberts@u-­‐paris10.fr and anna.akimova@yahoo.fr Abstracts may be in any of the three official language of the conference, English, French or Russian.

Posted by sarayu at 12:44 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: "Russia, in Theory," a graduate conference at UPenn, March 7, 2014

Deadline: January 14, 2014

Russia, in Theory
A graduate conference presented by
The Program in Comparative Literature and Theory, Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Slavics Without Borders, a Graduate Student Colloquium
Friday, March 7, 2014
University of Pennsylvania
Keynote Speaker: Boris Groys (NYU, SHG Karlsruhe, EGS)

The “end of history” in 1991 was, in many ways, a Russian affair. Seemingly overnight, Russia was transformed from "the most progressive society on earth" into the defeated arch-nemesis of the free world, thus ushering in a new era of post-history—quite an accomplishment for a country that supposedly entered “world history” only in the eighteenth century. Of course, Fukuyama’s cosmic, geopolitical vision was hardly the first time that Russia has been cast in such a grandiose role. Since Peter the Great’s heavy-handed transformation of “medieval” Rus’ into a Western-styled Empire, Russia has presented a tempting playground for theorizing and applying European conceptions of history, enlightenment and progress. Over the course of the nineteenth century, Russian intellectuals, influenced by German Idealist philosophy of history, fought over the place of the “Russian Idea” in the civilizational economy of the world. In the twentieth century, generations of European thinkers struggled to understand the meaning of the Soviet experiment. Finally, in our ostensibly post-historical twenty-first century, the experience of post-socialist Russia continues to pose meaningful questions for the ideologues of the Western political, economic and social establishment, as well as for those who wish to resist their hegemony.

Our conference aims to examine and complicate the idea of “Russia” and its role in both local and global philosophical discourse. What place does Russia hold in the imaginations of Western philosophers, from Hegel and Marx to Žižek and Badiou, and how did it come to do so? What meaning does standing with or apart from the West hold among ideologues of the so-called “Russian Idea,” from Gogol’ to Limonov? Finally, what does Russian philosophy, art and political practice, from Chaadaev to Podoroga, from Karamzin to Pussy Riot, from Catherine to Lenin, to Surkov— have to contribute to our understanding of the past, the present and the future states of world history and its discontents?

We are interested in submissions from all humanitarian disciplines, including, but not limited to philosophy and critical theory, literature, history, anthropology, political science, culture and media studies, which may in some way tackle the following general topics:

—Europe or Asia? Empire or Periphery? Russia’s place in the geopolitical and social imaginary
—The place of Russia in religious, mystical and eschatological thought
—What is to be done? Russia and the idea of radical politics
—Russia and the theoretical discourse of modernity & post-modernity
—Shklovsky, Kojève, Jakobson: the Russian turn in continental philosophy and aesthetics
—Mimesis, montage and the Kino-Eye: the impact of Soviet film theory
—Dreamworld, phantasm and catastrophe: Russia in the utopian and dystopian imagination
—The Russian poet as a prophet? The place of Russia in the world literary canon
—To reach and overtake decaying capitalism? The Soviet experiment— theory, reality and memory wars
—Tsarism, capitalism and socialism with a human face: Russia’s place in the discourse of the human
—“Three worlds” theory: the contest of socialism and the West across the globe
—Everything was forever, until it was no more: making sense of post-Soviet Russia

Please send your 300 word abstracts in the body of an email with “Russia, in Theory submission, LASTNAME” in the title to Pavel Khazanov and Alex Moshkin at slavicswithoutborders@gmail.com, by January 12, 2014. Submissions should include the paper title, author’s name, affiliation, and email address.

Posted by sarayu at 12:41 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: 7th Annual OASIES Graduate Student Conference, Columbia University

Deadline:
January 15, 2014

*CFP: 7th Annual OASIES Graduate Student Conference


The *Organization for the Advancement of Studies of Inner Eurasian
Societies *at Columbia University, New York University, and Princeton
University is pleased to announce its 7th Annual Graduate Student
Conference, to be held:

Saturday, March 29, 2014
International Affairs Building, Room 1512
Columbia University

*“The Hinge of the World: Connections, Networks, and Linkages in Inner
Eurasia”*
Inner Eurasia has been and continues to be particularly fertile terrain for
thinking through ideas of connections, networks, and linkages across
culture, space, and time. The very language of connecting and linking,
however, can inadvertently simplify the complex and mutually constituting
qualities of interactions at the point of impact. While the popular concept
of globalization, for example, often highlights the entangled nature of
politics, history and society, its theorizations also open up possibilities
for more thorough investigation into the different elements of these
entanglements. In other words, a productive engagement with connections and
networks must be coupled with a re-interrogation of the basic units of
analysis that might otherwise be too easily presupposed. Bearing this in
mind, this year’s conference asks: in what ways can rethinking connections,
networks, and linkages not only reconfigure but re-conceptualize the
categories that structure our scholarship on Inner Eurasia?

The conference considers Eurasia past and present, spanning from the Black
Sea to Mongolia, from Siberia to South Asia. Stressing
multi-disciplinarity, submissions are welcome from a variety of
departments, programs, and centers, including but not limited to:
Anthropology, Archeology, Art History, Comparative Literature, Fine Arts,
History, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Caucasian Studies, Central
Asian Studies, Inner Asian Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Mongolian
Studies, Slavic Languages and Literature, South Asian Studies, and Tibetan
Studies.

Possible approaches may include, but are not limited to:

- texts: literary, musical, visual, oral
-intertextuality: influences, resonances, reiterations
- exchange: economic, cultural, linguistic
- diaspora: coming and going
- globalism and nationalism
- centers and peripheries
- governance and citizenship
- gender and ethnicity
- negotiating belonging
- stratification

*Keynote*: Andrew Wachtel, President of the American University of Central
Asia; Professor of Slavic Languages, Northwestern University

*Submission Instructions*
Please include the following information with all submissions:
1) Name of presenter
2) Academic position and institutional affiliation
3) Title of the paper
4) Abstract of no more than 300 words
5) Audio-visual equipment needs
6) Contact information (please include e-mail address and telephone number)

Send submissions to *oasiesconference@gmail.com
* no later than *January 15, 2014* [as an
attachment in pdf or doc format].

Presentations will be limited to 15 minutes in length.
Unfortunately, financial support is not available for participants.

For more information on OASIES and past conferences visit www.oasies.org

Posted by sarayu at 12:23 PM | Comments (0)

November 05, 2013

CFP: 6th Biennial AWSS Conference: Women, Gender, and Revolution in Slavic Studies (Thursday, April 10, 2014)

Deadline: December 15, 2013

Call for Papers
6th Biennial AWSS Conference: Women, Gender, and Revolution in Slavic Studies
Thursday, April 10, 2014
Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Atlanta, GA
Proposal Deadline: December 15

The Association for Women in Slavic Studies (AWSS) is soliciting paper presentations on the theme of “Women, Gender, and Revolution in Slavic Studies” for its 6th Biennial Conference to be held on Thursday, April 10, 2014 at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Atlanta, GA. The conference will be held in conjunction with the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (SCSS), which opens Thursday evening and runs through Saturday. Participants of the AWSS Conference are encouraged to attend and participate in the SCSS conference as well (a separate CFP will be issued for that conference). AWSS Conference participants are eligible to receive the SCSS rate for the hotel, $165.00/night.

The theme of women, gender, and revolution can be approached in a variety of ways. Most concretely, the these addressed the actions of men and women in political revolution, broadly conceived, including (but not limited to) events of 1848, 1905, and 1917, events leading up to the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe, and the post-Community transformations after 1989. The theme also invites the study of gendered representations of revolutionary events, and of significant transformation in gender roles at any time in Russia and East European History.

The keynote talk for the conference will be delivered by Janet Johnson, Associate Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies at Brooklyn College, City University of New York. Dr. Johnson (PhD 2001, Indiana University-Bloomington) is an expert on gender, violence, and civil society in post-communist transitions in Eastern Europe. She has published and spoken widely on these subjects. Her talk at the conference will be on “Revolutionizing Gender Studies”: Though not everyone understands it, the study of women in Slavic Studies revolutionized gender studies by clarifying that change of regime--such as from communism to post-communism--radically alters gender. Russia's recent move toward authoritarian should also make us re-think gender, this time by highlighting the role of informal networks, practices, and institutions. Gender-blind social scientists are claiming these notions as their own, even though they have been hidden there all along in gender studies, especially among those of us who study places outside of Western Europe and North America.

The conference organizers invite proposals from scholars at all stages in their careers and in any discipline of Slavic Studies (history, literature, linguistics, political science, sociology, anthropology, economics, gender studies, etc.). Proposals should consist of a 250-word abstract of the paper (including the paper’s title) and a brief one-page CV that includes author’s affiliation and contact information. Proposals are due by December 15 to Sharon Kowalsky, Associate Professor of History, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu. Participants will be notified of their acceptance approximately four weeks after the proposal deadline.

Any questions about the conference or the program should be directed to Sharon Kowalsky (Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu) or Karen Petrone (Petrone@uky.edu).

Posted by sarayu at 01:29 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: The 19th Biennial Conference on Balkan and South Slavic Linguistics, Literature and Folklore

Deadline: November 15, 2013

The 19th Biennial Conference on Balkan and South Slavic Linguistics, Literature and Folklore will take place at The University of Chicago in Chicago, IL, USA, April 25-27, 2014.

Abstract Submission Deadline: Friday, 15 November 2013
Acceptance Notification Date: Wednesday, 15 January 2014

The conference organizers are now accepting proposals for papers that treat some aspect of Balkan and/or South Slavic linguistics, literature, or folklore, including culture. Abstracts should be maximum one page, including examples and bibliography, 12-point font, at least 1" margins, and should not contain name(s) or affiliations(s) of the author(s).

Abstracts should be submitted as an email attachment in PDF format to Meredith Clason (mclason@uchicago.edu). The paper title, author name(s), affiliation(s), and contact information should be given in the body of the email. The abstract itself should have only the title.

Questions about the conference may be directed to Meredith Clason (mclason@uchicago.edu).

Posted by sarayu at 01:28 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: Conference of Central Asian Language and Linguistics ( Indiana University, May 16 & 17, 2014)

Deadline:January 3, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

This spring, the C
enter for Languages of the Central Asian Region (CeLCAR) will be hosting the first ever
Conference of Central Asian Language and Linguistics (ConCALL) at
Indiana University during the weekend of
May 16 & 17, 2014.

We are now accepting submissions for 20-minute paper presentations (with 10 minute post-presentation questions and discussion) on topics related to Central Asian languages and linguistics within the conference theme: “Building a Bond: Strengthening the Central Asian Language Education Community.”

SUBMISSION can include, but are not limited to:

• linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics)

• acquisition (first and second language acquisition)
• pedagogy

• education

Submission should consist of a titled abstract of no more than 500 words in.pdf format sent as an email attachment to akkent@indiana.edu by the d
eadline of Friday, January 3, 2014.

Submissions will be sent for peer review, and submitters will be notified of acceptance no later than Monday, February 3, 2014.

QUESTIONS regarding submissions may be directed to Amber Kennedy Kent at akkent@indiana.edu.

QUESTIONS regarding the conference may be directed to Dr. Öner Özçelik (Director, CeLCAR) at oozcelik@indiana.edu.

For more information, please visit our conference website at http://www.indiana.edu/~akkent/ConCall2014.html.

REMINDER OF IMPORTANT DATES

Proposal Submission Deadline: Friday, January 10, 2014
Acceptance Notification: Friday, January 31, 2014
Registration Deadline: Friday, March 28, 2014

Conference Date: Friday and Saturday, May 16 & 17, 2014

Posted by sarayu at 01:19 PM | Comments (0)

October 31, 2013

CFP: Conference of Central Asian Language and Linguistics

Deadline:January 3, 2014


CALL FOR PAPERS

This spring, the Center for Languages of the Central Asian Region (CeLCAR) will be hosting the first ever Conference of Central Asian Language and Linguistics (ConCALL) at Indiana University during the weekend of May 16 & 17, 2014.

We are now accepting submissions for 20-minute paper presentations (with 10 minute post-presentation questions and discussion) on topics related to Central Asian languages and linguistics within the conference theme: “Building a Bond: Strengthening the Central Asian Language Education Community.”

Presenters will have the opportunity to submit to the published proceedings of the conference.

SUBMISSION can include, but are not limited to:

• linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics)
• acquisition (first and second language acquisition)
• pedagogy
• education

Submission should consist of a titled abstract of no more than 500 words in.pdf format sent as an email attachment to akkent@indiana.edu by the deadline of Friday, January 3, 2014.

Submissions will be sent for peer review, and submitters will be notified of acceptance no later than Monday, February 3, 2014.

QUESTIONS regarding submissions may be directed to Amber Kennedy Kent atakkent@indiana.edu.

QUESTIONS regarding the conference may be directed to Dr. Öner Özçelik (Director, CeLCAR) at oozcelik@indiana.edu.

For more information, please visit our conference website at http://www.indiana.edu/~akkent/ConCall2014.html.

REMINDER OF IMPORTANT DATES

Proposal Submission Deadline: Friday, January 10, 2014
Acceptance Notification: Friday, January 31, 2014
Registration Deadline: Friday, March 28, 2014

Conference Date: Friday and Saturday, May 16 & 17, 2014

Posted by sarayu at 12:47 PM | Comments (0)

October 04, 2013

CFP: Workshop: The Memory of Communism in Europe: Actors, Norms, Institutions

Deadline: December 1, 2013

Working Group 1 Politics of Memory
Call for Papers

Workshop: The memory of Communism in Europe: actors, norms, institutions

Paris, 15th-16th May 2014


Twenty years after the fall of the Soviet bloc, contested memories of Communism are being constantly reactivated by political and social actors in the former Eastern bloc. Conflicting narratives on the Communist past are simultaneously getting torn out of their national frameworks through the increasing involvement of international and transnational actors in the “management of the Communist past”.

This workshop aims at discussing the recent proliferation of debates on Communism in local, national and international venues by focusing on the writing of the history of Communism (textbooks, museums, historical debates...); the legal assessment of Communism (domestic laws, trials...); the internationalization of narratives and norms (symbolic condemnation of the ‘crimes of Communism’ by the Council of Europe and the European Union, case law of the European Court of Human Rights).

Papers discussing in theoretical and conceptual terms the framing of social representations of Communism in different national contexts are welcomed. Additionally, papers with a comparative approach or a transnational perspective will be very well received.

Proposals for papers should contain a title and a brief summary (100 words). Deadline for submission is 1st December 2013. Papers accepted will be taken into consideration for the publication agenda of the Working Group on Politics of Memory.

Please, submit paper abstracts to:
Carlos Closa carlos.closa@csic.es
Georges Mink mink@u-paris10.fr
Laure Neumayer laure.neumayer@univ-paris1.fr

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:11 AM | Comments (0)

September 26, 2013

CFP: Conference on Inter-Asian Connections IV: Istanbul (October 2-5, 2013)

Deadline: February 11, 2013

Conference on Inter-Asian Connections IV: Istanbul (October 2-5, 2013)

CALL FOR WORKSHOP PAPERS
Deadline: Monday, February 11, 2013 Co-organized and co-sponsored by the Social Science Research Council, Yale University, the National University of Singapore (NUS), the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (HKIHSS) at the University of Hong Kong, Göttingen University and Koç University – collectively the “Conference Organizing Committee.”

The Inter-Asian Connections Conference Organizing Committee is pleased to announce an open call for individual research paper submissions from researchers in any world region, to participate in a 4-day thematic workshop at an international conference, Inter-Asian Connections IV: Istanbul.

To be held in Istanbul and hosted by Koç University, the conference will host seven concurrent workshops led by two or three directors and showcasing innovative research from across the social sciences and related disciplines. Workshops will focus on themes of particular relevance to Asia, reconceptualized as a dynamic and interconnected historical, geographical, and cultural formation stretching from the Middle East through Eurasia and South Asia, to East Asia. Six workshops were chosen competitively from among 43 applications while one was organized by the host institution. We are now accepting applications for all seven workshops.

The conference structure and schedule have been designed to enable intensive ‘working group’ interactions on a specific research theme, as well as broader interactions on topics of mutual interest and concern. Accordingly, there will be a public keynote and plenary sessions in addition to closed workshop sessions. The concluding day of the conference will bring all the conference participants together for the public presentation and exchange of research agendas that have emerged over the course of the conference deliberations.

Individual paper submissions are invited from junior and senior scholars, whether graduate students or faculty, or researchers in NGOs or other research organizations, for the following six workshops. For the full Calls for Papers and detailed descriptions of the individual workshops, click the links below.
CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

(click to see full descriptions and calls for the individual workshops)

"After Neoliberalism?" The Future of Postneoliberal State and Society in Asia
Workshop Directors: Emel Akçali (Department of International Relations and European Studies, Central European University), Ho-Fung Hung (Sociology, Johns Hopkins University) and Lerna Yanik (Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Kadir Has University)

Asian Early Modernities: Empires, Bureaucrats, Confessions, Borders, Merchants
Workshop Directors: Kaya Sahin (Department of History, Indiana University) and Hendrik Spruyt (Department of Political Science, Northwestern University)

Contemporary Art and the Inter-Asian Imaginary
Workshop Directors: Alice Jim (Department of Art History, Concordia University) and Henry Tsang (Faculty of Culture + Community, emily carr university of art + design)

Inequalities in Asian Societies: Bringing Back Class Analysis
Workshop Directors: Deniz Yükseker (Sociology, Koç University), Ching Kwan Lee (Sociology, UCLA) and Can Nacar (History, Koç University)

Porous Enclaves: Inter-Asian Residential Projects and the Popular Classes from Istanbul to Seoul
Workshop Directors: John Friedmann (School of Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia) and Erik Harms (Anthropology and Area & International Studies, Yale University)

Rescuing Taste from the Nation: Oceans, Borders and Culinary Flows
Workshop Directors: Krishnendu Ray (Department of Nutrition, Food Studies & Public Health, New York University) and Cecilia Leong-Salobir (University of Wollongong)

The Sounds and Scripts of Languages in Motion
Workshop Directors: Jing Tsu (East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University) and Ronit Ricci (School of Culture, History and Language, College of Asia-Pacific, The Australian National University)
APPLICATION PROCESS

In order to apply, applicants must submit: (a) on-line application, (b) a 500-word abstract of research paper to be presented at the workshop, (c) a short statement (200-300 words) explaining how the paper fits the theme of the workshop, and (d) 1-2 page C.V. (academic qualifications and employment history; list of publications).
Participants will be selected by workshop directors in consultation with the Conference Organizing Committee.
Selection decisions will be announced in March 2013. Selected participants must confirm their decision to participate within 10 days of receiving the selection notification.

Posted by sarayu at 02:03 PM | Comments (0)

September 20, 2013

CFP: 2014 Soyuz Conference (February 28-March 1, 2014, Miami University, Ohio).

​Deadline:​ November 1, 2013

Call for Papers:
A joint annual SOYUZ* and Havighurst Center Young Researchers’ conference on The Topos of Justice,
​​
February 28-March 1, 2014, Miami University (Ohio).
In 20th- and 21st-century Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia various theories and practices of justice dramatically affected the lives of millions of people. While states engaged in various experiments from constitutional to moral governance, from People’s Courts to human rights policies, citizens actively contributed, subverted, and renegotiated official regimes of justice. This conference will explore experiments in law and regulations, narratives and theories of justice, translations and material objectifications of justice, and ethic and affective circulations of justice and morality in its local and global forms.

We invite comparative and interdisciplinary research-based contributions on various issues interconnected with the topic of justice in various socialist and post-socialist societies and in the regions affected by socialism and post-socialism. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
· law, justice, morality
· justice, nationalism, and the state
· local, national, and transnational regimes of justice
· art, science, religion, and justice
· justice and citizenship
· philosophical perspectives on justice
· grassroots moral economies and ethical frameworks
Keynote speakers: Kim Lane Scheppele (Princeton University) and Robert M. Hayden (University of Pittsburgh)
Please send a 300 word abstract and a short CV by
​​
November 1st, 2013, to Lynn Stevens at havighurstcenter@muohio.edu. Please include your full name, paper title, and academic affiliation. Write “YRC, SOYUZ 2014” in the subject line. Papers will be selected and notifications made by January 1, 2014. Limited funding will be available to cover local expenses of participants. If selected to participate in the conference, you will be expected to submit a completed paper to the Havighurst Center by
​​
February 1st, 2014.
The 2014 conference organizing committee includes Neringa Klumbytė (anthropology, Miami University), Ted Holland (geography, Miami University), Susanne Cohen (anthropology, University of Chicago). If you have any questions, please contact Neringa Klumbytė at klumbyn@miamioh.edu.
*
*SOYUZ, the Post-Communist Cultural Studies interest Group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and the official unit of the Association for Slavic, East European Studies and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) began in 1991 as a regionally focused group responding to the fall of the Soviet and socialist states. Since then, it has broadened to include graduate students and scholars working in any region affected by socialism and post-socialism. http://www.aaanet.org/sections/soyuz/. SOYUZ unites young and senior scholars and graduate students and organize conferences every year, which are hosted by different institutions.
Young Researchers Conferences have been organized by the Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies at Miami University since 2000 and have attracted young and senior scholars for discussions of various topics related to socialism and post-socialism and the region of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia. See http://www.units.muohio.edu/havighurstcenter/conferences/youngresearchers.html.

Posted by sarayu at 03:54 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: Subjectivities after Stalin: The Khrushchev and Brezhnev Eras (The European University at Saint Petersburg, April 25-26, 2014)

Deadline: November 15, 2013

Call for Papers

The European University at Saint Petersburg

Subjectivities after Stalin: The Khrushchev and Brezhnev Eras

April 25-26, 2014


The last decade has witnessed the publication of a number of richly researched studies of the Khrushchev period. Increasingly, studies of the Brezhnev era and late socialism generally are also appearing. Many of these histories focus on the ways in which Soviet citizens responded to the change and continuity that characterized the post-Stalin Soviet Union. Our picture of late socialism has been fleshed out or reframed by investigations of Soviet citizens’ reactions to Gulag returnees, to the growth of mass media, and to changes to official language, among many other social, cultural, and political phenomena. Our conference hopes to build on these investigations by focusing squarely on the Soviet subject her/himself. We aim to examine the manifold personality ideals in circulation after Stalin and above all the ways in which Soviet citizens assimilated, recast, and/or challenged these ideals. In so doing, we seek to combine the above historiographical trends with the turn by historians of the early Soviet era in the 1990s and 2000s to investigation of “Soviet” and other subjectivities.

We hope that our conference will lead to productive exploration of the reception of the personality ideals of the Khrushchev and Brezhnev eras. The result would be the creation of a picture of the post-Stalin Soviet Union that includes various subjectivities within its frame. We invite proposals from scholars of different disciplines, including anthropology, art history, history, political science, Slavic studies, and sociology. Questions asked in proposed papers might include, but are not limited to, the following:

Ideals in Circulation:

• What personality ideals were proposed in the late socialist era and how did they change over time?
• How did they relate to Stalin-era, Lenin-era, or pre-revolutionary ideas?
• What led to the creation of new ideals or subtle or significant changes to the old? Pre-revolutionary holdovers, resistance informed by alternative readings of Marxism-Leninism, socio-economic modernization, new practices, new discursive regimes, the Cold War and exchange with the West, Eastern Europe, and the Third World?
• Who, both within and beyond Party-state institutions, advanced and monitored the ideals?
• To what extent did similar ideals exist in different cities, regions, or republics? For different age groups, genders, classes, or nations?
• Can we refer to the ideals as “modern” subjectivities?
• What words or phrases were used to describe the ideals? For example, to what degree did the term New Soviet Man persist into the post-Stalin years?
• In what artistic, literary, or other representational forms were they presented? To what extent were some forms considered more appropriate in capturing a particular ideal than others?
• To what extent was the act of putting a personality ideal into circulation constitutive of normative or other subjectivities?

Reception:

• Theoretically, how should we conceptualize the subject who performs the act of reception?
• How were the various ideals received, reformulated, or challenged? To what extent were normative ideals accepted with ambivalence?
• In speaking of reception, to what degree do we refer to the intentions, beliefs, or inner worlds of our subjects as opposed to the forms of representation to which we have access?
• How should we read their words or representations? To what extent should we read the words themselves and to what extent should we read between the lines?
• To what degree was there space from Party control or involvement?
• By what institutional or social practices were subjectivities constructed? By way of family, friends, school, work, or some combination? By way of consumption and engagement with the material world?
• How was the creation of the self tied to the creation of a community?
• How did the writing of the community’s or another person’s life lead to the creation of one’s own subjecthood?
• To what degree did old subjectivities exist within the same person alongside new subjectivities? How did a single individual’s subjectivity change depending on the context in which he/she found himself/herself or on the genre in which he/she represented himself/herself?
• How did geography, age, gender, class, and nation affect reception?
• How did the urbanization or socio-economic modernization of the late Soviet period affect the nature of reception?

The working language of the conference will be Russian. The EUSP will provide necessary funding for travel and accommodation expenses. The proceedings will be based on pre-circulated papers of 8,000-9,000 words. Papers may be written in English or Russian and should be submitted by April 1.

Select papers, to be revised after the conference, will be included in a Russian-language peer-reviewed volume to be published by the press of the European University at Saint Petersburg. Funding will be available for translation of English-language articles into Russian.

Please submit a 300-word abstract and one-page CV by November 15 to apinsky@eu.spb.ru. Invited participants will be contacted by December 1.

*Sponsored by FGUP (Federal State Unitary Enterprise) “Goznak.”

Posted by sarayu at 03:53 PM | Comments (0)

September 10, 2013

CFP/Conferences & Workshops: Translation in Russian Contexts, Uppsala University, Sweden

Deadline: November 1, 2013


The field of Translation Studies has recently seen a broadening of geographical perspectives. Attention has shifted from largely Eurocentric concerns to non-European areas and traditions. However, only recently has Europe's 'internal Other' - Russia and Eastern Europe - been recognized as a distinct 'translation zone' of complex historical and social contexts, transcultural and translingual mediations and formative processes. Much work remains to be done, particularly in relation to the vast space successively occupied by the Russian empire, the Soviet Union and the Russian Federation - a geographical area that has seen multifaceted, large-scale translation activities, as well as a long history of sophisticated theoretical reflection, both of which are little known outside its boundaries. This blind spot within Translation Studies has its counterpart within the field of Slavic Studies, where phenomena related to translation and their significance for cultural production remain understudied. This conference sets out to fill this gap by focusing on translation in Russian contexts from a variety of theoretical perspectives.

The conference will also explore the phenomena of translingualism and transculturality in relation to various practices and theoretical conceptions of translation. This is of particular relevance due to the heterogeneous ethnic makeup of authors writing in Russian and to the successive waves of emigration to the West. On the basis of Russian-related material, the conference will explore the implications of translingual literature and transculturality for the field of Translation Studies.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers dealing with the following topics related to Russian contexts:
Translation and Transculturality in Early Contexts
Translation and Transculturality in the 19th?21st Centuries
Translating Non-Fiction: Contexts of Science and Philosophy
Institutional Contexts of Translation (e.g. the roles of publishing
houses, writers' organizations, and translation seminars)
Translatio Imperii: Contexts of 'Nationalities' Translation
Contexts of Contestation: Discourses on Translation and Translational Canons
Diaspora Contexts: Self-Translation and Translingual Russian Literature
Metacontexts: Transdisciplinary Perspectives

Proposal submission
Abstracts of 200 words and a short bio should be sent to: julie.hansen@ucrs.uu.se & susanna.witt@ucrs.uu.se. Include your title, affiliation and email address. The deadline for submissions is 1 November 2013.

Download this Cfp as a PDF:
http://www.ucrs.uu.se/digitalAssets/171/171252_translationrussiancontextscfp.pdf

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:38 PM | Comments (0)

CFP /Conferecnes & Workshops : 12th Biographical Readings in Memory of V.V. Iofe

Deadline: April 1, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

12th Biographical Readings in Memory of V.V. Iofe

20-22 April 2014, St Petersburg, Russia

The conference series “The Right to a Name: Biography in the 20th Century” is dedicated to the memory of Veniamin Viktorovich Iofe (1938-2002) and was established in 2003. The annual Conference is organised by the Research and Information Centre “Memorial” (St Petersburg), with support from the European University in St Petersburg, the Polish Institute in St Petersburg and several other institutions and foundations.

Each conference is interdisciplinary and presents a broad spectrum of contemporary biographical research in the fields of history, sociology, anthropology, psychology, literary studies and a number of other disciplines. We are interested in different approaches and their point of contact and in methods of describing and presenting biography.

The main topics for the 12th Conference are: Autobiography, Hagiography, the Biography of Biographers, Sources, Collective Biography, Theory of Biography, Narratives, Political Biography, Biographical Dictionaries, Biography and Myth, Death and Biography and others.

All sessions will be held in Russian. Papers must not exceed 20 minutes; every paper is followed by 20 minutes discussion. A conference volume will be published (only papers given at the conference qualify for publication).

The conference organisers are unable to fund travel or accommodation in St Petersburg.

We are now inviting paper proposals. The deadline for proposals is 1 April 2014. Please send your proposal as a single file in Word format to iofe.readings@gmail.com. Your proposal should contain an abstract of no more than 2000 characters in length and a short CV (name, employment/study, function, main publications – no more than 300 signs). The subject line should read “12th Readings. Paper Proposal *Your Name*”

Director: Irina Flige (Director of the Research and Information Centre “Memorial”);

Coordinator: Tatyana Kosinova ( kossinova@mail.ru, + 7 921 743 4557).

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:34 PM | Comments (0)

August 12, 2013

Conference: Europe East and West Undergraduate Research Symposium (Friday, April 11, 2014)

Deadline: January 27, 2014

The Undergraduate Research Symposium is a conference designed to provide undergraduate students from the University of Pittsburgh and other colleges and universities in the region with advanced research experiences and opportunities to develop presentation skills. The event is open to undergraduates from all majors and institutions who have written a research paper from a social science, humanities, or business perspective focusing on the study of Eastern, Western, or Central Europe, the European Union, Russia, or other countries of the former Soviet Union. The Symposium is held on the University of Pittsburgh-Oakland campus.

Deadlines:
1) Students must submit applications with 250-300 word abstracts and paper drafts by January 27, 2014.
2) Selected students will be notified by mid-February 2014.
3) Final revised papers are due by March 19, 2014.

For more information about this research opportunity, go to www.ucis.pitt.edu/ursymposium or contact Gina Peirce at gbpeirce@pitt.edu.

Posted by bkohlerk at 04:24 PM | Comments (0)

August 06, 2013

Workshop for Graduate Students of Soviet History

This year’s workshop will begin in mid-October and meet once a month through mid-May. Ideally, each meeting should feature two graduate students – one from the EUSP and one from a foreign institution – who would precirculate works in progress such as grant proposals, conference papers, or dissertation chapters on related topics. Participation is expressly open to students in other disciplines, including art history, sociology, anthropology, political science, and Slavic studies.

Students interested in presenting their work this fall should submit a 300-word abstract of their papers and a CV to the email address below by September 1. Applicants for spring semester sessions may submit their materials through December 31. Funding is available for presenters who would be traveling to St. Petersburg from Moscow or elsewhere in Russia or neighboring countries. Students who would like to attend the workshop should send along their contact information to keep them informed of the schedule.

Students interested in learning more about the EUSP and History Department are invited to go to http://www.eu.spb.ru/

The workshop for graduate students of Soviet history at the History Department of the European University at Saint Petersburg will be continuing this coming academic year. The workshop brings together EUSP students and foreign students currently conducting archival research in Russia and neighboring countries. The primary goal of the workshop is twofold: first, to enrich participants’ research projects and promote an exchange of knowledge about relevant historiographies, methodologies, and archival and other sources; and second, to create a larger and more international academic community for participants, and thus to offer them a network of international contacts on which to draw for intellectual as well as professional ends.

This past spring, during the workshop’s inaugural semester, presenters included doctoral candidates from Harvard University and the University of California at Berkeley.

Posted by bkohlerk at 04:21 PM | Comments (0)

May 21, 2013

CFP Conference: Conference on Balkan and South Slavic Linguistics, Literature and Folklore

Abstract Submission Deadline: Friday, November 15, 2013

The 19th Biennial Conference on Balkan and South Slavic Linguistics, Literature and Folklore will take place at The University of Chicago in Chicago, IL, USA, April 25-27, 2014.


Acceptance Notification Date: 15 January 2014

The conference organizers are now accepting proposals for papers that treat some aspect of Balkan and/or South Slavic linguistics, literature, or folklore, including culture. Abstracts should be maximum one page, including examples and bibliography, 12-point font, at least 1" margins, and should not contain name(s) or affiliations(s) of the author(s).

Abstracts should be submitted as an email attachment in PDF format to Meredith Clason (mclason@uchicago.edu). The paper title, author name(s), affiliation(s), and contact information should be given in the body of the email. The abstract itself should have only the title.

Questions about the conference may be directed to Meredith Clason (mclason@uchicago.edu).

Posted by sarayu at 12:53 PM | Comments (0)