November 21, 2013

CFP: International Conference: Multilingual Situations and Policies towards Multilingualism in Europe

Deadline: April 1, 2014


International Conference

Multilingual Situations and Policies towards Multilingualism in Europe

Université Paris-Ouest Nanterre La Défense, November 20-21, 2014

Organising Committee: DorothéeCailleux (Literature, German), Sergei Sakhno (Linguistics, Russian) and Jean-Robert Raviot (Political Science, Russian), Centre de recherches pluridisciplinaires et multilingues (CRPM, EA 4418)

This conference will focus on various multilingual situations in political, administrative and judicial institutions, both national and international, in Europe taken in the broad sense of the term (the current Member States of the Council of Europe), as well as in large organisations (NGOs, schools and universities, research institutes, etc.).Papers will examine, from a comparative perspective, the policies towards multilingualism that have been adopted, from the 19th century to the current day.

The conference’s originality lies in the fact that it will bring together both professionals (translators, interpreters, those with responsibility for determining linguistic policy and applying it, etc.)and academics from a variety of disciplines (including linguistics, law, history, political science, sociology, and anthropology). Speakers will both review the situation concerning multilingualism in Europe, and analyse the different strategies adopted either to take advantage of its benefits, or to meet the challenges it poses.

Multilingualism has been promoted via a very diverse range of policies in the different European states and in a range of international organisations, both public and private, governmental and non-governmental, commercial and humanitarian.

We would especially welcome the following:

• accounts by translators / interpreters or other professionals working in large international organisations (The European Commission, The European Parliament, The EU Court of Justice, The Council of Europe, The European Court of Human Rights), in political or administrative institutions in multilingual European states, in large multinational corporations or NGOs;
• analysesby legislators of the legal situation where several languages co-exist, and of the problems involved in applying laws to promote multilingualism;
• analysesof the historical, constitutional and political contexts in which multilingualism is promoted, of the challenges linked to its promotion, and of the ways in which different languages are exploited for political purposes in national and international contexts in Europe;
• case studies of concrete examples of multilingualism in political life and in society;
• studies looking at how different languages influence each other when they interact within the same institution. For example, is the French or the English spoken at the European Commission the same as that spoken in Paris or London? Analyses of neologisms, hybrid languages, etc.;
• analysesof personal experiences of multilingualism as expressed in biographical studies, autobiography or fiction, multilingualism as a means either of self-promotion in a cosmopolitan environment, or of opposition in a jingoistic political context.

Proposals for papers (250 words) should be sent no later than 1 April 2014 to the conference organisers:
dcailleux@u-paris10.fr, ssakhno@u-paris10.fr, jrraviot@u-paris10.fr

Speakers will be allocated 20 minutes. The working languages of the conference will be French, German, English and Russian.

We hope to be able to contribute towards speakers’ travel and accommodation costs. However, given our limited resources, we will only be able to support colleagues who have been unable to secure funding from their own institutions.

Publication of the conference proceedings is planned for 2015.

Posted by jmkirsch at 03:22 PM | Comments (0)

Call for Book Manuscripts: ''Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics & Society''

Call for Book Manuscripts - "Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics & Society" (SPPS)
http://www.ibidemverlag.de/Series/Soviet-and-Post-Soviet-Politics-and-Society/
https://www.facebook.com/events/464149413704186/

The trilingual scholarly "Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society" (SPPS) was launched in 2004 by Andreas Umland, and is published by ibidem Press. SPPS publishes new research on understudied aspects of the history of the former Soviet bloc and on the post-Soviet transitions. With more than 120 titles available in English, German, and Russian, SPPS is now a comprehensive resource and established publication series, on the recent past and current affairs of the post-Soviet states.

The series provides an outlet for empirical research on a broad variety of themes within the field of communist and post-communist studies. Among them are those issues that sometimes remain under the radar of mainstream publishing on the region including, among many other topics, political radicalism, higher education, religious life, local history, bilateral relations, cultural innovation, minority protection, ethnic tensions, etc. Many important determinants and aspects of the transformation of the former Warsaw Pact states have not yet been systematically analyzed. SPPS aims to create a space for this to happen.


SPPS is open for submission of book projects that fit this remit. We will be glad to consider proposals for research monographs, edited collections and, in some cases, doctoral theses for publication. SPPS is also open for proposals of re-publications of seminal, but not widely available works and translation projects.

All SPPS titles are published as accessibly priced paperbacks, allowing for the widest possible dissemination. Submissions are reviewed by members of the large Editorial Committee and Advisory Board, headed by the series’ General Editor Andreas Umland, Dr.phil. (FU Berlin), Ph.D. (Cambridge), at the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy.

Please request further information and proposal submission guidelines from:

Jakob Horstmann, ibidem Commissioning Editor
mjh@ibidem-verlag.de

You can find previously published titles and additional information about the series at
http://www.ibidemverlag.de/Series/Soviet-and-Post-Soviet-Politics-and-Society/

https://www.facebook.com/events/464149413704186/

POST SCRIPTUM:
I will be at the upcoming ASEEES Convention at Boston, on 21-25 November 2013. If you would like to meet there for a chat, please, send an e-mail to: andreas.umland@stanfordalumni.org

Posted by jmkirsch at 03:20 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: Watersheds: Poetics and Politics of the Danube River

Deadline: March 1, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Watersheds: Poetics and Politics of the Danube River

Marijeta Bozovic and Matthew Miller, editors

The collected volume Watersheds: Poetics and Politics of the Danube River brings together scholars from diverse disciplinary approaches and across regional fields of study. The Danube, Europe’s second largest river, directly connects ten countries; its watershed covers four more. Yet the river, like much of the region it traverses, has attracted surprisingly little scholarly attention, and what exists too often privileges single disciplinary or national perspectives. We instead see the river as both boundary and border, fluidly connecting multiple nations, and cultural and economic spaces, through legal and illegal flow. It intersects civilizations and nature, physical and imaginary spaces and invites an array of critical approaches.

As both a real geographic feature and a guiding metaphor, the Danube river brings together the scholarship of a number of leading and rising scholars across fields and disciplinary divisions. Our book attempts to synthesize a number of regional studies, methodologies and modes into a collective work of truly interdisciplinary research; at the same time, humanities disciplines and the powerful interpretative strategies they offer serve as our primary anchor. The concepts we use to both metaphorize and actualize the Danube form the linkage between these discussions and vital issues in natural and social science disciplines. We hope that this collaboration and the lasting exchanges it will cultivate can serve as a promising model for genuine, creative, and inspiring interdisciplinary academic work.

1. In an age of tenuous unification, we actively seek to culturally remap Europe by means of the river and river imaginary, thus rectifying Europe’s frequent and erroneous omission from conversations about global engagement and innovative explorations of world culture. The Danube river has been claimed successfully only by one empire: Austria-Hungary, the (spectral) multicultural state par excellence. Today, the complicated cultural imaginaries entrained by the river help us to call into question paradigms of nation and nationality in areas fraught by aggressive discourses on identity, language, the link between people and place, and blood purity. When examined together, the multiethnic, multilingual, and historically intertwined relations of the Danube populations present an opportunity to explore this broadly conceived site as an instantiation of the global present.

2. Our book will critically examine the discourse of Central Europe to undermine autochthonic conceptions of culture. It will challenge the imagined divide between the democratic and Western-leaning “center” and “foreign” Bolshevik ideology coming from the Russian East or the Balkan South. The Danube is haunted by historical tragedy and memories of genocide; by the legacies of Austro-Hungarian, Ottoman, and Soviet empires; and by cultural (mis)appropriations of classical antiquity. We will explore the cultural and economic flows moving downriver and upstream, as well as the mapping of cultural capital through spatial and temporal metaphors: cities such as Vienna, Budapest, and Belgrade serve as regional centers, while margins appear culturally “belated.”

3. Finally, it is the metaphorical and real power of the Danube as artery, lifeline, and locus for circulation and communication that we hope to exploit intellectually and critically as we search for a way to flow between fields and methodologies: from Germanic to Slavic, from the interventions of experimental art to environmental studies of changing physical spaces littered with actual and figurative historical debris. To facilitate cross-disciplinary communication, many of our authors embrace broadly conceived bridge concepts relevant to multiple methodologies, such as “pollution” and “circulation.”

We invite submissions from scholars of literature, cinema, music, architecture and other culture, historians, anthropologists, sociologists, geographers, and others interested in exploring the Danube and its peoples. To complement the work already gathered, we particularly encourage submissions pertaining to the German, Slovakian, Bulgarian, Romanian, Ukrainian river and to its delta.

Submissions due by
March 1, 2014.

Please send your work to marijeta.bozovic@yale.edu and mdmiller1@colgate.edu

Posted by jmkirsch at 03:12 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: International conference: Transferring the Soviet New Man: Eastern and Central European Perspectives

​Deadline: December 20, 2103

CALL FOR PAPERS

Transferring the Soviet New Man: Eastern and Central European Perspectives
An international conference at Babeș-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca, Romania (13-14 June, 2014)

http://new-man-eceu.blogspot.com/2013/10/call-for-papers-central-to-soviet.html


Central to the Soviet experiment was the refashioning of man into what had often been referred to as the Homo Sovieticus. In the past decades, a growing body of new scholarship has focused on this very concept, tracking its origins in Russian political thought, cultural history, and aesthetics. Studies of comparative scope have generally confined themselves to considering the parallels and differences between the Soviet and Nazi/Fascist human engineering practices within the realms of Totalitarianism Studies, or the relation of the Soviet case to the Chinese and Cuban cases. Little attention has been paid yet in this context to the Eastern and Central European countries which were closely integrated into the Soviet sphere of interest after the Second World War. This interdisciplinary conference aims to fill this gap of scholarship.

The Stalinist version of the New Man was designed not only for domestic use, but for export. Significantly, in a competitive manner that conditioned the cultural orientation of high Stalinism, the New Man was imagined to be a prototype not only to the East, but to the West as well, an alternative to Western “decadent” subjectivity. In most cultures of Eastern and Central Europe, outside of the Soviet Union, however, anthropological standards were traditionally set by Western models, even though their reception was often critical. This tension seriously challenged the communist parties that tried to legitimize the transformation of their societies by invoking and reworking local traditions.

Questions that arise here include: How did the various communist elites try to accommodate ideas of the Soviet Man to local political, intellectual, cultural, and religious traditions? How did the social structure of Polish, East German, Czechoslovakian, Hungarian, Yugoslavian, Romanian, and Bulgarian societies affect the articulation of ideas of the New Man? What kind of local experimental practices or ideas emerged in pedagogy, psychology, criminology, or the medical sciences that aimed at the creation of a New Man? What were considered to be the primary tools for reworking oneself, and which among these were local or regional specificities, if any? Were there local models for the New Man?

Creating a new type of man, transforming the individual human soul and body, was certainly part of a larger project: that of remaking the entire people. This often involved a confrontation with the long established discourses on the given nations’ characteristics, which requires us to raise the question: How the idea of a New Man was incorporated into these controversies on national characteristics, and what was its function within these debates?

We invite proposals for papers addressing the above questions. We welcome proposals from academics working in diverse languages and fields, including literary studies, history of arts, cultural studies, religious studies, psychology, pedagogy, criminology, gender studies, intellectual history, the history of ideas, and social history.

An abstract of 300–400 words and a curriculum vitae should be submitted to socreal.eceu@gmail.com by 20 December 2013, and working papers must follow by 1 June 2014. Please send any inquiries about the conference to the same address. The language of the conference will be English, and presentations should last no longer than 20 minutes.

Partial funding may be available for contributors. Pending the outcome of funding applications, we hope to be able to offer lodging and meals for speakers, and perhaps a few travel bursaries for those in the greatest need.

Our goal is that the best and most relevant papers to emerge from the conference will be collected in a volume or thematic journal issue.

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:59 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: Romantic Subversions of Soviet Enlightenment: Questioning Socialism's Reason

Deadline: January 20, 2014

Princeton Conjunction – 2014

An Annual Interdisciplinary Conference

ROMANTIC SUBVERSIONS OF SOVIET ENLIGHTENMENT:

QUESTIONING SOCIALISM’S REASON

May 9-10, 2014

Princeton University

One year after Nikita Khrushchev’s famous “secret speech,” Voprosy Literatury (Literary Issues), a new Soviet journal dedicated entirely to topics in literary theory, history, and criticism, published an essay that initiated a long-term intellectual discussion. In her article, Anna Elistratova, an expert on the English romantic novel, directly challenged the aesthetic doctrine of the post-Stalin period by asking, “When it comes to the artistic perception of the world, can we really say that realism is historically the only effective method we should rely on?” Was it not time to admit, the essay continued, that the legacy of romanticism, with its humanistic dreams and rebellious outbursts, could still offer an important source of inspiration for progressive socialist art?

This initial challenge to the hegemony of realist art was followed by a series of heated debates in 1963-1968 and 1971-1973. Drawing on European and Russian aesthetic traditions, participants of the debates highlighted such characteristics of romanticism as its propensity “to stare at the darkness in order to discern new directions” and its emphasis on the “absolute autonomy and uniqueness of the individual.” Within a few decades, the status of romanticism had radically changed. From “literature’s ballast,” romanticism evolved into a symptom of “social emancipation.” By the 1980s, dismissive descriptions of romanticism as “passive, conservative, and reactionary” had ceded to a vision of it as a “revolution in arts” that privileges dynamism, becoming, and spontaneity.

Today it is hard not to read these literary debates as an attempt to reframe the role of the humanities in the USSR in the wake of the Terror, World War II, and Stalinism. Ostensibly an esoteric philological enterprise, these late-Soviet discussions used romanticism as a historically available framework that could generate alternative versions of identity, spiritual values, social communities, and relations to the past.

Philological explorations of romantic tropes, of course, were only one expression of a broader interest in reclaiming romanticism. In the 1960s, newly publicized texts by Isaak Babel, Andrei Platonov, and Boris Pilniak helped to reframe the Bolshevik Revolution, giving Communist Utopia one more chance. The reappearance of revolutionary romanticism was paralleled by a host of other trends. Late Soviet cinematic adaptations of Shakespeare and the theatrical productions of Alexander Vampilov and Viktor Rozov highlighted the figure of the “problematic hero,” deeply attuned to psychological nuance and the complications of being in the world. Interest in the occult and the mystical (facilitated by the publication of Mikhail Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita in 1966) provided yet another ground for destabilizing normative socialist-realist canons. A structurally similar escape from the rationality of Stalinist neoclassicism was manifest in various attempts to articulate a feeling of kinship with the natural world: from the vagabond aesthetics of ‘tourism in the wilds’ and the bardovskii chanson to the village prose movement, with its insistence on cultural rootedness and national belonging. Throughout the Soviet Union, romantic nationalists offered alternatives to the unifying and universalizing notion of the “Soviet people” via reinterpretations of folkloric motifs (in Sergei Paradzhanov’s films), revitalization of the historical novel (through the novels of Vladimir Korotkevich), revisions of ancient history (in Lev Gumilev’s exploration of ethnogenesis), or reconceptualization of Marxism (in Yulian Bromley’s theory of ethnos). The rhetorical force of romanticism had a profound impact on such key late-Soviet phenomena as the communard movement in education, major construction projects in Siberia (e.g. in Bratsk), or Soviet fascination with taming the atom and conquering the cosmos.

Instead of reducing these romantic interventions to the status of non-conformist versions of dominant Soviet aesthetics, our conference proposes to view sotsromantizm as an autonomous (and relatively coherent) form of historical imagination. This politico-poetical configuration brought together dispersive impulses, anarchic inclinations, psychological introspection, and metaphorical structuring in order to repudiate the basic Soviet conventions of normative rationality and mimetic sotsrealism. In short, this conference will approach the romantic imagination in the late Soviet period as a form of critical engagement with “actually existing” socialism.

While many recent studies of late socialism are structured around metaphors of absence and detachment, we want to shift attention to concepts, institutions, spaces, objects, and identities that enabled (rather than prevented) individual and collective involvement with socialism. Sotsromantizm offers a ground from which to challenge the emerging dogma that depicts late Soviet society as a space where pragmatic cynics coexisted with useful idiots of the regime. The romantic sensibility sought to discover new spaces for alternative forms of affective attachment and social experience; it also helped to curtail the self-defeating practices of disengagement and indifference.

We invite historically grounded and theoretically informed submissions from anthropologists, historians, sociologists, and scholars of art, architecture, cinema, literature, music, media, theater, and popular culture, and all those interested in investigating social and cultural practices made possible by the late socialist appropriation of romanticism. In particular, we welcome submissions that analyze the double nature of sotsromantizm, understood both as a critique of the Soviet Enlightenment and as an alternative form of Soviet socialism. We especially encourage submissions that explore instances and practices of romantic subversions in non-Russian cultural and linguistic contexts of the socialist world.


Abstracts (300 words) and short CVs (no more than two pages) should be sent to sotsromantizm@gmail.com by January 20, 2014.

Those selected to present at the conference will be contacted in early February 2014. Final papers will be due no later than April 15, and will be posted on the conference website.

We may be able to offer a number of travel subsidies for graduate students and participants from overseas.

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:56 PM | Comments (0)

November 18, 2013

CFP: Submissions for a special Slavic & East European issue of The International Poetry Review

Deadline: March 15, 2014

The International Poetry Review is accepting submissions for its winter 2013 issue: a special issue on translations of contemporary (post-1950) Slavic and East European poetry, to appear spring 2014, guest-edited by Kathleen MacFie and Sarah Krive. Contemporary translation is the Review’s primary focus, appearing in bilingual format, along with a limited section, in every issue, of poetry originally written in English. We look for translations from the work of contemporary poets, without adhering rigidly to any one school of translation theory. We do request that the translator be responsible for securing translation and publication rights as necessary.

For this special issue, only work received by March 15, 2014 will be considered for publication. We prefer submissions of 3-5 poems, but individual poem submissions are acceptable. Please provide the original Slavic-language text as well as the translation. We require fonts compatible with Microsoft Word for the Macintosh. Translations should not have appeared anywhere else, including self-published chapbooks or on Internet sites. Individuals will be informed of decisions to publish on a rolling basis through March.

We prefer to receive submissions via email, preferably as Word attachments, which should be sent to both guest editors: kathleen_macfie@uncg.edu, sakrive@uncg.edu.

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:57 AM | Comments (0)

October 29, 2013

CFA Residential Fellowship: "Capital and Commodities" theme in 2014-15

Deadline: January 15, 2014

The Institute for Historical Studies at the University of Texas at Austin announces its 2014-15 theme, "Capital and Commodities."

For the Institute’s 2014–15 program, we invite proposals for research into the history of capital and commodities. The co-development of financial and ecological crises, the global proliferation of mass consumerism, and ongoing social and military conflicts over access to natural resources suggest the critical importance of historicizing the study of capital and commodities. Indeed, over the last several decades, historians have compiled an impressive body of work on the history of commodities and their production, circulation, uses, and cultural significance.

Research into commodity chains has forced historians to consider questions of social identity formation and has invigorated analysis of systems of communication and representation. Historical studies have also revealed the impact of commodity production and consumption on natural landscapes and sociopolitical formations. Recent globalized economic crises have further helped focus scholarly attention on how commodity exchange and capital creation involve the conjunctural dimensions of history: credit booms and debt crises, cycles of inflation and deflation, economic growth (and its intellectual constructions) and limits to growth. In this vein, the Institute encourages analytical approaches that underscore the sociocultural, political, environmental and intellectual underpinnings of the history of capital and commodities.

We especially welcome proposals that encompass broad timespans (including the medieval and early modern periods) and that reach across geographic areas and disciplinary boundaries.

Read more at: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/historicalstudies/news/7106

The IHS invites applications for resident fellows at all ranks. Deadline: January 15, 2014. For more information about the institute's fellowship and application process, please visit:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/historicalstudies/fellowships/resident-fellows.php

For further information on IHS, including events programming and applications for residential fellowships for 2013-14, please visit the IHS website:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/historicalstudies/

Queries: historyinstitute@austin.utexas.edu

Posted by jmkirsch at 03:32 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: Twelfth Annual Material Culture Symposium for Emerging Scholars: Consuming Objects: Negotiating Relationships With the Material World

Deadline: December 2, 2013

Call for Proposals—2014 Emerging Scholars Symposium

Consuming Objects: Negotiating Relationships With the Material World

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library Saturday, April 12, 2014

The Center for Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware invites submissions for papers to be given at the Twelfth Annual Material Culture Symposium for Emerging Scholars.

Focus: "Consuming" is a multivalent word, fraught with provocative denotations and connotations. Whether we buy them, sell them, use them, or eat them, we all consume objects through a variety of channels. We seek papers that highlight the intersection between people and their things within this broad framework of consumption. This conference will consider how material culture can act as an extension of ourselves, provide repositories for memory, help stabilize identity, interrupt our sense of scale and space, give permanence to relationships, function as a semiotic marker, and enable human activities. Papers may also address how objects mediate human sensory experience and create aesthetic meaning. We encourage papers that reflect upon and promote an interdisciplinary discussion on the state of material culture studies today.

This conference is not bound by any temporal or geographical limits.
Disciplines represented at past symposia include American studies, anthropology, archaeology, consumer studies, English, gender studies, history, museum studies, and the histories of art, architecture, design, and technology. We welcome proposals from graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and those beginning their teaching or professional careers.

Format: The symposium will consist of nine presentations divided into three panels. Each presentation is limited to eighteen minutes, and each panel is followed by comments from established scholars in the field. There will be two morning sessions and one afternoon session, with breaks for discussion following each session and during lunch. Participants will also have the opportunity to tour Winterthur’s unparalleled collection of early American decorative arts and to engage in a roundtable discussion on Friday, April 11, 2014. Travel grants will be available for presenters.

Submissions: Proposals should be no more than 300 words. Please indicate the focus of your object¬based research, the critical approach that you take toward that research, and the significance of your research beyond the academy. We encourage the inclusion of relevant images with your abstracts.

While the audience for the symposium consists mainly of university faculty and graduate students, we encourage broader participation. In evaluating proposals, we will give preference to those papers that keep a more diverse audience in mind. Programs and paper abstracts from past symposia are posted here:
http://www.materialculture.udel.edu/emerging_scholars.html.

Send your proposal, with a current c.v. of no more than two pages, to emerging.scholars@gmail.com.

Deadline: Proposals must be received by 5 p.m. on Monday,
December 2, 2013
. Speakers will be notified of the vetting committee’s decision in January 2014. Confirmed speakers will be asked to provide symposium organizers with digital images for use in publicity and are required to submit a final draft of their papers by March 11, 2014.

Posted by jmkirsch at 03:28 PM | Comments (0)

CFP - Verbal Prefixes and Particles

​Deadline: November 20, 2013​

Theme session - Call for Papers

At the 47th Annual Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europaea
​​11-14 September 2014 Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland
http://sle2014.eu/
www.dsglynn.univ-paris8.fr/prefixes.html

***Verbal Prefixes and Particles. Empirical research in grammatical aspect and lexical semantics***

The prefixes (preverbs, coverbs etc.) and particles (adpositions, intransitive prepositions etc.) associated with verbal constructions, such as those in the Slavic and Germanic languages, represent one of the most complex fields of linguistics. At once central to the aspectual system and verbal semantics, understanding their interdependent role in both the grammar and the lexicon is crucial to language description.

This theme session seeks to bring together empirical linguists working in the field of verbal prefixes and particles in Slavic and Germanic languages. The theme session is open to any theoretical orientation but will focus on empirical research.

A non-exclusive list of suggested areas include:
- Comparative and typological studies
- Studies on the interaction of aspect and Aktionsart
- Construction-based research
- Interaction of pragmatics and grammar
- Near-synonymy of prefixed verbs or verb + particle combinations
- Polysemy of prefixes and particles/prepositions
- Sociolinguistic and stylistic variation

This information can be found at:
www.dsglynn.univ-paris8.fr/prefixes.html
For further information, email:
Agnieszka Będkowska-Kopczyk (abedkowska@ath.bielsko.pl)
Dylan Glynn (dglynn@univ-paris8.fr)
Lilli Parrott (lilli.parrott@gmail.com)

*Abstracts:*
Abstracts must be submitted twice. First a short abstract (300 words) will be submitted to the theme session convenors and second a longer abstract (500 words) will be submitted to the conference itself.
It is essential that the abstracts follow strict guideless for structure.
1. Introduce briefly the problem / question / hypothesis.
2. Summarise briefly the method / data
3. Summarise briefly the results or expected results.

Please submit abstracts in a modifiable file format such as .rft, .doc, .docx or .odt
Submit abstracts to the convenors mentioned above.

*Dates:*
Short Abstract for theme session: 20th Nov. 2013
Acceptance to theme session: 25th Nov. 2013
Longer abstract for SLE: 15th Jan 2014
Acceptance to SLE: 31st March 2014

Posted by jmkirsch at 03:24 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: Tolstoy Conference, August 2014

Deadline: February 1, 2014

On August 11-15, 2014, the State Museum-Estate of Leo Tolstoy at Yasnaya Polyana will host the IX International Academic Conference Tolstoy and World Literature. We invite applications for papers on Tolstoy’s work and art in the context of Russian and world literature, history, philosophy, and religion. Traditionally the Conference is organized with reference to Tolstoy’s personal library with books and periodicals in 39 foreign languages. The proceedings of the Conference will be published.
Accommodation, meals, cultural program and transportation from Moscow to Yasnaya Polyana and back are covered by the organizers.

The deadline for applications is June 1st, 2014. The application includes the information about the participant and the abstract of the paper to be presented. THOSE WHO NEED AN INVITATION FOR A VISA MUST SEND THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION BY FEBRUARY 1, 2014: a copy of the front passport page, home institution, address, telephone, and the place where the visa will be issued.

Please forward your application to Galina Alekseeva: gala@tgk.tolstoy.ru or galalexeeva@tula.net

Telephones: (48751)76-1-41, (4872)38-67-10

Those with questions can contact Donna Orwin at donna.orwin@utoronto.ca or Galina Alekseeva.

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:57 PM | Comments (0)

CFP "Constructing a Collective European Imaginary"

Deadline: November 30, 2013

CFP: Constructing a Collective European Imaginary (from the 1940s through the Present)

This conference is the final academic event in a series of scientific gatherings initiated by the Paris-based cultural association Lubliniana and devoted to the construction of a collective European imaginary, from the late Middle Ages through the 21st century. While the previous editions of the project (Paris 2009, Lublin 2010, Gotha 2011) dealt extensively with cultural and artistic exchanges and interactions between the Roman, German, and Slavic parts of Europe throughout the early modern and the modern period (with particular attention to France, Germany, and Poland), the concluding symposium will shift focus to contemporary Europe and will look into the ways in which the continent currently acts—or fails to act—as a transnational site of cultural identification and imagination. Co-organized by the Lubliniana association, KU Leuven, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Université Libre de Bruxelles, and Université de Liège, the conference will take place in Leuven, Belgium, September 25-27, 2014.

Click http://www2.arts.kuleuven.be/info/icope for the full version of the call for papers.

Submissions (in English or French) should be 600 words plus a working bibliography and short bio, submitted to the conference organizers (icope@arts.kuleuven.be) by
November 30, 2013. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out in December 2013. Further details will be made available on the conference website .

Funding is pending approval, but the organizers will do their best to offer support for travel and accommodation costs.

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:34 PM | Comments (0)

October 24, 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS: STATE VS INDIVIDUAL MORALITY IN POST-SOCIALISM

Deadline: 10 February 2014

About STSS (www.tlu.ee/stss)

STSS is fast-growing open-access interdisciplinary journal for the study of transition societies. Created in 2009, it has been indexed by SCOPUS in 2012 and we are currently in Q3 (3rd quartile), ranking 320 out of 552 journals included in sociology and political science. Given that we are an independent journal created only four years ago we believe this is already a good result and we are confident we can improve our ranking quickly in the next few years. Please check our articles if you want to be convinced of our potential. Our primary focus is post-socialist countries of Eastern Europe and the former USSR, although we are open to contributions focusing on any other world region.

We are looking for 1-2 more papers on the topic.

Over the past decade we have witnessed a tendency to critically look at the way state morality, laws and rules are constructed. Following the appearance of Gibson-Graham's seminal work (1996), the term ‘diverse economies’ has come to populate a growing number of scholarly works across a wide range of disciplines. As part of this scholarship alternative narratives to capitalism have been explored and neoliberalism has been criticised. Based on the Bourdieaun remark that individual and state moralities do not necessarily overlap, a number of empirical works (Polese 2008; Rasanayagam 2011; Wanner 2005) have shown the limits of the corrupt-non-corrupt distinction. This, in turn, has highlighted the potential conflict between what is legal (with a definition of legality provided by the state) and what is socially acceptable by the citizens themselves (van Schendel & Abrahams 2005). This has led to the understanding that what a society, or a group of individuals, is ready toaccept and justify is not necessarily what the state official narrative (based on laws and rules) would accept.

We welcome empirically-rich accounts, constructed on recent and/or ongoing research, that broadly deal with the topic suggested above.

The deadline for the 2014 Spring issue is 10 February 2014. However, potential contributors are welcome to contact us at an early stage to discuss an idea you might want to develop or have developed. Please visit the webpage www.tlu.ee/stss for further information on submission guidelines or contact stss@tlu.ee (also if you would like to discuss a proposal).

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:54 PM | Comments (0)

Call for Papers: "And after Yugoslavia, Yugoslavia! New Histories & New Approaches"

Deadline: November 30, 2013

Call for Papers: "And after Yugoslavia, Yugoslavia! New Histories & New Approaches"

Please send all submissions to Marina Antić: antic@pitt.edu

The last twenty years of scholarship on former Yugoslavia and its
successor states have undergone significant shifts, not least of which
has been the introduction of new theoretical positions and paradigms
(Bakić-Hayden and Hayden, Wolff, Todorova). However, the vast majority
of this new scholarship has struggled to escape the resurgence of
nationalist quasi-historical narratives or the transformation(s) of the
Cold War totalitarian historical paradigm into postsocialist
“transitology.” The latter has served as the ideological correlate of
neo-liberal reforms in Eastern Europe, providing interpretive frames
(justifications) for the rise of the free market economy, electoral
democracy, and the construction of “civil societies,” the three
hallmarks of postsocialism. In this context, transitology has primarily
focused on EU accession as the final conceptual and political frontier
of these now liberalizing societies. In reality, the transition itself
has been not into Europe proper but into a periphery of global capital
(Shields). Moreover, in the wake of the global financial crisis, the
Arab Spring and the radical “left turn” of Latin America, the
“transitology” discourse has increasingly appeared vacuous, fetishized,
a totem of a global order fundamentally premised on what David Harvey
has called “accumulation through dispossession.”

From history to art, economy to literature, political science to
anthropology, scholars have been preoccupied with explaining the violent
end of Yugoslavia and its aftermath via the nationalist and totalitarian
models (Glenny, Kaplan, Malcolm, Alcock, Meier, Wachtel, Bieber, and
others); they have struggled to explain Yugonostalgia and the Yugoslav
legacy that seems not to vane in the region (Todorova and Gille, Djokić,
Wachtel); and many have continued to treat the Yugoslav past as an
aberration and the post-Yugoslav reality as the “natural” state of
affairs. Despite challenges to the “Orientalist” or “Balkanist”
discourse of the region and despite attempts to situate the rise of
nationalism into global realities and socio-economic developments
(Woodward, Gowan, Petras and Vieux), Yugoslav history and the
post-Yugoslav reality have been codified within the old confines of Cold
War history-cum-transitology and nationalist historiography.

At the same time, post-Yugoslav cultural production, social movements,
and cultural and ideological shifts in the region have been telling a
different story. Social opposition to nationalist regimes has only
increased with time in the most troubled post-Yugoslav state – Bosnia
and Herzegovina (JMBG protests, Dosta!) as well as in the most
“Europeanized” one – Slovenia (2012-2013 Maribor protests, ongoing
nation-wide). Film, literature, art, and alternative media productions
have continually challenged simplistic nationalist narratives as well as
the dire, postsocialist realities (Tanović, Žbanić, Stanišić, Rudan,
Veličković, Studio LuDež); and everyday life in the post-Yugoslav states
has challenged “transitology” and its lessons of civil society,
political culture, and free market economics. In the process, the
Yugoslav past remains a central preoccupation of both the nationalist
regimes and its former citizens: from neo-nazi revivals to
Yugonostalgia, the legacy of this common and shared cultural,
socio-economic, and political space continues to influence all spheres
of life in many different ways.

This volume addresses this disjuncture between post-Yugoslav realities
and nationalist historiography and/or the neo-liberal transitology. What
sets this volume apart from a myriad of collections about former
Yugoslavia is a commitment to critically engage, challenge, and advance
beyond nationalist historiography and transitology while reassessing the
Yugoslav legacy and reexamining the Yugoslav past as phenomena
fundamentally relevant to our understanding of the present and, indeed,
our future. In short, this volume (re)considers “Yugoslavia” as a
relevant contemporary political and social phenomenon, rather than
merely a tragic and/or utopian historical moment. Moreover, our
intervention seeks to deliberately reposition the post-Yugoslav space in
the context of the unraveling of the global neo-liberal order. We
explicitly reject the narrative that the only “realistic” (or ideal)
future for (the former) Yugoslavia is membership in a dissolving
neo-liberal monetary and political union—the only facsimile of a
political program advanced by the “transitional” local elites and their
international partners. Our conception of Yugoslavia emerges as against
the EU’s preferred “Western Balkans” and/or “South-East Europe” monikers
and in line with more than a decade of democratic, alter-globalist
eruptions in Latin America, North Africa and the Middle East.

The volume consists of three sections:
1. Post-Yugoslav Realities
This section is devoted to assessment of the current situation in
post-Yugoslav states, analysis of the effects of postsocialist
“transition,” new social movements, as well as the wider, global context
for the social changes that have taken place since the fall of socialism.

2. Post-Yugoslav Culture
This section is devoted to critique and presentation of post-Yugoslav
cultural production in context, including but not limited to new
literature, film, art, popular culture, and other media productions. We
are especially interested in approaches that address the continuities
and discontinuities between the Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav cultural
production in the region.

3. Yugoslav History and Legacy
While the question of Yugoslav legacy is a common thread for the entire
volume, this particular section is devoted specifically to new topics,
contexts, and theories regarding the common history and heritage. From
the origins of the Yugoslav idea in the 19th century to the legacy of
the Non-Aligned Movement in Yugoslavia to an exploration of
Yugonostalgia today, this concluding section seeks to raise new research
questions and suggest new points of departure for studying the region
and its history.

We invite proposals for contributions to any of the above mentioned
topics, while especially encouraging new methodological and theoretical
orientations, interdisciplinary work, and research from across the
humanities and social sciences.

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:50 PM | Comments (0)

CFP: International Conference: "Soviet Film Studios at War, 1939-1949"

Deadline: December 15, 2013

International
C
onference "Soviet Film Studios at War, 1939-1949"
12-13 June 2014, Eisenstein Library, Moscow

Call for Papers

The organizers are pleased to announce the International Conference on "Soviet Film
Studios at War, 1939-1949" which will take place in Moscow between June 12th and 13th
2014.

The project

There is a consensus among historians that if is difficult to write about WWI and
WWII without touching upon the war of images. However, Soviet history remains marginal in
research on this aspect of the visual turn. It is necessary to renew the traditional vision of the
propaganda art and go beyond the films representing Stalin and great historic events and explore
the full spectrum of the production. Feature films, cartoons, educational pictures, newsreels
and documentaries can be studied not only in themselves but also in terms of the public
they addressed and their role in the mobilization for the war effort. Even though the cinema
occupied a central place in Soviet propaganda, films must be compared to the news coverage,
press photography, posters, literature and theater. A total history of the cinema should embrace
issues which scholars usually study separately such as the institutions (the organization
of new control agencies, the reorganization of the production far behind the frontline), the industry
(technologies and economic problems), aesthetics and the social context (life in the
evacuation).

The conference takes stock of the first results of the project CINESOV financed by the
Agence Nationale de la Recherche (France). The project explores Soviet cinema not only as
art but also as social sphere, production process, industrial establishment, business and as a
problem of marketing and consuming images between 1939 and 1949. The main focus is on
the first stage of filmmaking, the production process, and more precisely on the functioning of
the studios in the USSR and the territories it controlled in the immediate [prewar and?]
postwar years. The aim of the conference is to study ways the Soviet structures of film production
dealt with thee requirements and constraints of the war.

The main questions are:

- methods, sources, the results of previous research: how to seize the singularities of the
studios in the context of the war, which are their common features?

- institutional issues: the Sovietization of the studios in the territories annexed on the eve of
the war; changes in legal statuses, organization and internal structures; censorship; shifts in
the relationships between center and periphery; evacuation and return; the fate of studios in
territories under nazi occupation; the Sovietization of nazified studios and the purge of collaborators.

- economic and financial issues: the economic efficiency of the studios and their evaluation
by moviemakers and decision makers; how we can draw the balance sheet today? what is the
impact of the evacuation of the industry at large on the film industry and the production targets
of the studios? how studios manage the scarcity of financial resources? how decides the
priorities?

- technological issues: which technologies are employed? what sort of technological changes
are helped by the challenges of wartime cinema and the exchanges and seizures of material?
how many equipments are at the disposal of the moviemakers? how is allocated the equipment
acquired through the Lend-Lease operations and through the seizures? how technologies function
at the studios transferred to Central Asia?

- international issues: how to evaluate the comparison [?], the imitation, the collaboration
and competition with allied and enemy industries? what is the production of the enemy in occupied
Soviet territories, how it is organized? how knowhow is transferred in Soviet-occupied
territories? how the Soviets establish control?

- human resources: how is personnel allocated in the wake of the evacuation and the reorganization?
who are the new managers of the studios? how the mobilization takes place, what
role women play in it? how is organized the training of the newly recruited personnel? how
are decided the salaries and other forms of payment? how daily life looks like in the evacuation,
during the siege of Leningrad and other cities and after the return?

The conference is open to anyone doing research related to the main themes. The contributions
must be unpublished and founded on original sources.

The conference languages are Russian, English and French.

The deadline for sending the proposals is
December 15, 2013. Authors of the selected
projects will be informed in late January 2014.

The proposals must be in Russian, English or French. They must include
1./ the name, the home institution and the position of the applicant with his/her electronic address
2./ a short presentation of the applicant's researches with emphasis of their relevance to the
themes of the conference
3./ a vita
4./ a résumé of maximum 500 words of the proposed paper.

The proposals must be addressed to Vanessa Voisin (centre-fr@centre-fr.net). They
can be formulated individually and as members of a projected panel.

The organizers will help participants to obtain Russian visa. They finance the stay, the
meals of the participants and travel expenses if it proves possible.

Posted by jmkirsch at 02:49 PM | Comments (0)

October 11, 2013

CFP And After Yugoslavia, Yugoslavia! New Histories, New Approaches

​Deadline: November 30, 2013

Call for Papers: "And after Yugoslavia, Yugoslavia! New Histories & New Approaches"

The last twenty years of scholarship on former Yugoslavia and its successor states have undergone significant shifts, not least of which has been the introduction of new theoretical positions and paradigms (Bakić-Hayden and Hayden, Wolff, Todorova). However, the vast majority of this new scholarship has struggled to escape the resurgence of nationalist quasi-historical narratives or the transformation(s) of the Cold War totalitarian historical paradigm into postsocialist “transitology.” The latter has served as the ideological correlate of neo-liberal reforms in Eastern Europe, providing interpretive frames (justifications) for the rise of the free market economy, electoral democracy, and the construction of “civil societies,” the three hallmarks of postsocialism. In this context, transitology has primarily focused on EU accession as the final conceptual and political frontier of these now liberalizing societies. In reality, the transition itself has been not into Europe proper but into a periphery of global capital (Shields). Moreover, in the wake of the global financial crisis, the Arab Spring and the radical “left turn” of Latin America, the “transitology” discourse has increasingly appeared vacuous, fetishized, a totem of a global order fundamentally premised on what David Harvey has called “accumulation through dispossession.”

From history to art, economy to literature, political science to anthropology, scholars have been preoccupied with explaining the violent end of Yugoslavia and its aftermath via the nationalist and totalitarian models (Glenny, Kaplan, Malcolm, Alcock, Meier, Wachtel, Bieber, and others); they have struggled to explain Yugonostalgia and the Yugoslav legacy that seems not to vane in the region (Todorova and Gille, Djokić, Wachtel); and many have continued to treat the Yugoslav past as an aberration and the post-Yugoslav reality as the “natural” state of affairs. Despite challenges to the “Orientalist” or “Balkanist” discourse of the region and despite attempts to situate the rise of nationalism into global realities and socio-economic developments (Woodward, Gowan, Petras and Vieux), Yugoslav history and the post-Yugoslav reality have been codified within the old confines of Cold War history-cum-transitology and nationalist historiography.

At the same time, post-Yugoslav cultural production, social movements, and cultural and ideological shifts in the region have been telling a different story. Social opposition to nationalist regimes has only increased with time in the most troubled post-Yugoslav state – Bosnia and Herzegovina (JMBG protests, Dosta!) as well as in the most “Europeanized” one – Slovenia (2012-2013 Maribor protests, ongoing nation-wide). Film, literature, art, and alternative media productions have continually challenged simplistic nationalist narratives as well as the dire, postsocialist realities (Tanović, Žbanić, Stanišić, Rudan, Veličković, Studio LuDež); and everyday life in the post-Yugoslav states has challenged “transitology” and its lessons of civil society, political culture, and free market economics. In the process, the Yugoslav past remains a central preoccupation of both the nationalist regimes and its former citizens: from neo-nazi revivals to Yugonostalgia, the legacy of this common and shared cultural, socio-economic, and political space continues to influence all spheres of life in many different ways.

This volume addresses this disjuncture between post-Yugoslav realities and nationalist historiography and/or the neo-liberal transitology. What sets this volume apart from a myriad of collections about former Yugoslavia is a commitment to critically engage, challenge, and advance beyond nationalist historiography and transitology while reassessing the Yugoslav legacy and reexamining the Yugoslav past as phenomena fundamentally relevant to our understanding of the present and, indeed, our future. In short, this volume (re)considers “Yugoslavia” as a relevant contemporary political and social phenomenon, rather than merely a tragic and/or utopian historical moment. Moreover, our intervention seeks to deliberately reposition the post-Yugoslav space in the context of the unraveling of the global neo-liberal order. We explicitly reject the narrative that the only “realistic” (or ideal) future for (the former) Yugoslavia is membership in a dissolving neo-liberal monetary and political union—the only facsimile of a political program advanced by the “transitional” local elites and their international partners. Our conception of Yugoslavia emerges as against the EU’s preferred “Western Balkans” and/or “South-East Europe” monikers and in line with more than a decade of democratic, alter-globalist eruptions in Latin America, North Africa and the Middle East.

The volume consists of three sections:
1. Post-Yugoslav Realities
This section is devoted to assessment of the current situation in post-Yugoslav states, analysis of the effects of postsocialist “transition,” new social movements, as well as the wider, global context for the social changes that have taken place since the fall of socialism.

2. Post-Yugoslav Culture
This section is devoted to critique and presentation of post-Yugoslav cultural production in context, including but not limited to new literature, film, art, popular culture, and other media productions. We are especially interested in approaches that address the continuities and discontinuities between the Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav cultural production in the region.

3. Yugoslav History and Legacy
While the question of Yugoslav legacy is a common thread for the entire volume, this particular section is devoted specifically to new topics, contexts, and theories regarding the common history and heritage. From the origins of the Yugoslav idea in the 19th century to the legacy of the Non-Aligned Movement in Yugoslavia to an exploration of Yugonostalgia today, this concluding section seeks to raise new research questions and suggest new points of departure for studying the region and its history.

We invite proposals for contributions to any of the above mentioned topics, while especially encouraging new methodological and theoretical orientations, interdisciplinary work, and research from across the humanities and social sciences.



Please send all submissions to Marina Antić: antic@pitt.edu
Deadline: November 30th, 2013​

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:49 AM | Comments (0)

CFP: Siberian Historical Stu dies, Special Issue on "Conceptualizing GULAG"

Deadline: December 1, 2013

International journal "Siberian Historical Studies", Tomsk State University
(Russia)

Conceptualising GULAG: Visible and Invisible Spaces of Continuity and
Contemporary Practices of Remembrance

Totalitarian states of twentieth century produced the sites of mass
violence and such exemplary places of modern biopolitics as concentration camps. In the aftermath these sites continue to serve as tangible reminders of atrocities and provide important evidence for public recognition and remembrance of victims' suffering (Arendt 1979, Langer 1991, Levy 1988, Friedlander 1992). Recent memory studies have demonstrated how remembrance of mass violence across regions and cultures took various shapes ranging
from politics of victimisation and heroism to collective silence and
selective amnesia (Antze and Lambek 1996; Carsten 2007; Lambek 2002, 2006; Argenti and Schramm 2010). Given that in Russia memory about GULAG remains at the margins of public and official discourse and as a social fact has not yet received elaborate scholarly interpretation, the special issue seeks to address this underexplored area by examining the issue of continuity of unresolved GULAG past in the present and the ways it manifests and unfolds through spontaneous or unofficial forms of remembrance, symbolic imageries, localised interaction with abandoned and
re-appropriated spaces and territories of former GULAG camps. We welcome contributions in the disciplines of social and cultural anthropology, sociology and history that engage broadly with the legacy of GULAG and its contemporary social dimensions, i.e. continuity of social practices, visible and invisible aspects of GULAG legacy as well as voiced and silenced memories, local experiences of remembrance and forgetting.

The editors invite abstracts (max 500 words) in English and Russian that
respond to the focus of the issue. Please submit abstracts via email to
Olga Ulturgasheva (ou202@cam.ac.uk) by December 1, 2013.

Successful applicants will be asked to submit the draft articles
(4,000-5,000 words) by March 15, 2014. The special issue is scheduled for
the release by November 2014.

General inquiries should be addressed to:

Olga Ulturgasheva ou202@cam.ac.uk

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:25 AM | Comments (0)

CFP on Tolstoy's "War and Peace"

Deadline: "by December"

I am pleased to report that Grey House is supporting our field by publishing a collection on War and Peace as part of their Critical Insights series early next year. Furthermore, there is room in the volume for two or three more new essays on Tolstoy’s novel. These need to be brief: roughly 5000 words, including notes and works cited. First drafts will be due by December. A modest honorarium will be paid by the publisher.

Prospective contributors should contact me off-list at brett-cooke@tamu.edu.

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:21 AM | Comments (0)

October 04, 2013

CFA: NEH Summer Institute: “America’s East Central Europeans: Migration & Memory”

Deadline: March 4, 2014

National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute for College & University Teachers: “America’s East Central Europeans: Migration & Memory”
Columbia University, East Central European Center June 8-29, 2014

This NEH Summer Institute looks at 20th century Baltic, Western Slavic, South Slavic, Hungarian, as well as Jewish immigration to the United States from East Central Europe. Twenty-five NEH Summer Scholars will come together on the campus of Columbia University with some fifty master teachers and community representatives to address three core questions: First, what are some of the methodological and conceptual issues we should consider in the study of the East Central European emigrations? Second, how can we define the particular characteristics, motivations, and experiences of these immigrants? Finally, can we create a narrative synthesis of the “East Central European Experience” in America that could be integrated into broader courses on politics and immigration, sociology, and ethnic studies?

College teachers, independent scholars, museum curators, librarians and advanced graduate students are encouraged to apply for this competitive program. The application deadline is March 4, 2014, and successful applicants are notified March 31. Application information is available at NEHsummerinst.Columbia.edu or contact Co- Director Robert Davis (rhd2106@Columbia.edu) 212 854-4701,

Posted by jmkirsch at 12:32 PM | Comments (0)

CFA: Individual Advanced Research Opportunities

Deadline: November 25, 2013

The award amount is unspecified. IARO provides research support in up to three countries for a minimum of two months and a maximum of nine months. Participants are provided with visa assistance, international round-trip transportation, a monthly allowance for housing and living expenses, as well as emergency evacuation insurance. IARO fellows also have access to resources available in any of IREX's field offices.

IARO provides scholars and professionals with long-term support to perform policy-relevant research in the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia

Requirements

Graduate Student
New Faculty/New Investigator
Ph.D./M.D./Other Professional

Eligibility

The applicant must be a U.S. citizen and must be enrolled in a graduate degree program or currently hold a graduate degree at the time of application.

Fore more information visit: http://www.irex.org/application/individual-advanced-research-opportunities-iaro

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:18 AM | Comments (0)

CFP: One-Day Symposium on New UK Research on Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature

Deadline: December 15, 2013

Call for Papers:

One-Day Symposium: "New UK Research in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature"
co-organised by Dr. Katherine Bowers and Dr. Sarah Young

This symposium seeks to showcase new research on nineteenth-century Russian literature being done in the UK at present. In the past, the UK has made strong contributions to the study of the nineteenth century, but in recent years this field of study has become less visible. We propose to hold a meeting of nineteenth-century Russian literature researchers to present current research, facilitate productive discussion of the field, and, ultimately, create a lasting network that will help nineteenth-century Russian literature researchers communicate with each other to organise conferences and conference panels, special editions of journals, and other collaborative work. The symposium will culminate with a discussion of ways to make the study of nineteenth-century Russian literature more visible in the UK.

The event will be held Saturday, February 1, 2014 at Darwin College, Cambridge.

We are accepting abstracts of 250 words for 15-20 minute research papers on any aspect of nineteenth-century Russian literature. Talks will be grouped into thematic panels and be followed by time for questions and discussion. We welcome proposals from anyone working on nineteenth-century Russian literature, but will give preference to UK-based researchers and postgraduate students. Please submit abstracts to newrusslitresearchuk@gmail.com by December 15, 2013.

If there is interest, we will consider proposing a special journal edition with proceedings from the symposium. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to make their talks available as podcasts. Some funding is available for accommodation and/or travel costs. This event is sponsored by a Research Network Workshop Grant from CEELBAS, and is supported by the BASEES Nineteenth-Century Study Group and the Department of Slavonic Studies at the University of Cambridge.

For more information, please visit our website: http://19thcrusslit.weebly.com.

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:16 AM | Comments (0)

CFP: Paradise Found, or Paradise Lost? Nostalgia, Culture and Identity in Central and Eastern Europe

Deadline: January 31, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS - also downloadable at:
https://afrabricuru.u-paris10.fr/?p=200

Paradise Found, or Paradise Lost?
Nostalgia, Culture and Identity in Central and Eastern Europe

24th Conference of the British-French Association for the Study of Russian
Culture
(https://afrabricuru.u-paris10.fr)

Thursday 29th and Friday 30th May 2014

Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, Salle des Conférences, Bâtiment B

Organised by Dr Graham ROBERTS and Dr Anna LOUYEST
(Centre de Recherches Pluridiscilplinaires Multilingues, EA 4481,
http://crpm.u-paris10.fr)

The end of Communism in the USSR and its satellite states produced a wave
of collective euphoria that had not been seen in Europe since May 1945.
Nowhere was this feeling stronger than in the former socialist countries
themselves, where many felt that normal service had, as it were, been
resumed. As former Czech dissident Vaclav Havel put it at the time,
‘after decades of following the wrong track, we are yearning to rejoin the
road which was one ours too.’ Signs that things were ‘returning to
normal’ were everywhere: West Germans received their Ossi neighbours back
into the fold by giving each of them 100 West-deutschmarks as so-called
‘welcome money’; Hungarians could once again sit alongside their Austrian
cousins and thrill to La Traviata at the Vienna Opera; and Muscovites
finally got to taste their first Big Mac. The Socialist dream had been
cancelled, but in its place there was to be another utopia, a consumerist
paradise,
buttressed by liberal democracy at home, and lasting peace abroad.

Barely two decades later, there is, to paraphrase Marx and Engels, a new
spectre haunting Central and Eastern Europe – the spectre of nostalgia.
Perhaps this should not surprise us. As Svetlana Boym recently put it, in
her book The Future of Nostalgia, ‘nostalgia inevitably appears as a
defense mechanism in a time of accelerated rhythms of life and historical
upheavals.’ At one time this feeling was limited to émigrés fondly
reminiscing about their distant mother country. Now, however, it also
appears to touch those who live where they always have, but whose homeland
no longer officially exists.

This new nostalgia takes an astonishingly wide variety of forms. These
include the popularity among Berlin shoppers of the Ostpaket (East German
products in their original packaging), the reaffirmation of stereotypical
gender roles in Russian ‘glamour culture’, the rise of nationalism in
countries such as Hungary and the Czech Republic, and the rehabilitation
of long-forgotten artists or literary genres. This tendency to look at
the past through rose-tinted spectacles can also be seen in numerous
published collections of Soviet photographs of the 1970s (Optimizm
pamjati, Leningrad 70-x), or on countless social media sites, both
institutional and personal. While in the main, Oushakine (2007) is right
to argue that this new kind of nostalgia does not aim at political
restoration, there is often an important political subtext.

This conference aims to explore the many different forms nostalgia has
taken in Central and Eastern Europe since in the last twenty years. Among
the questions to be addressed are: What are the distinctive forms of
nostalgia in the region? Where does this nostalgia come from? What
purpose(s) does it serve? What, if any, is its political agenda? Is
nostalgia primarily a yearning for or a rejection of something? Whose
nostalgia is it anyway? What is the relationship between nostalgia and
kitsch? And how seriously does this nostalgia take itself? Papers are
invited from scholars working in a broad range of disciplines, including
Slavonic and East European Studies, politics, economics, anthropology,
law, business studies, linguistics, history and comparative literature.

Proposals, in the form of a 250-word abstract and a short cv, should be
sent BY 31 JANUARY 2014 AT THE LATEST, to BOTH organisers, at:
groberts@u-paris10.fr and anna.akimova@yahoo.fr Abstracts may be in any
of the three official language of the conference, English, French or
Russian. The organisers intend to publish a selection of papers after the
conference.

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:14 AM | Comments (0)

September 20, 2013

CFP: “Karel Kosík and Dialectics of the Concrete”.

​Deadline: December 31, 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS:
“Karel Kosík and Dialectics of the Concrete”.
Prague, 4– 6 June 2014

A conference organised by the Department for the Study of Modern Czech Philosophy,
Institute of Philosophy, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.

In 1963 Karel Kosík published his path-breaking book Dialectics of the Concrete. It made an
impact on both Marxist and non-Marxist thinkers, in Czechoslovakia and throughout the
world. In this work Kosík set for himself an ambitious task – to re-think the basic concepts of
the Marxist philosophical tradition and to employ them in the analysis of social reality. In the
course of his analysis he touched on a wide array of issues that are still relevant today,
including the problem of mystification or the “pseudo-concrete,” the social role of art, the
conception of reality as a concrete totality, the conception of the human being as an onto-
formative being, the systematic connection between labour and temporality, the
relationship between praxis and labour, and the explanatory power of the dialectical
method.

We would like to explore Kosík ́s seminal work in both breadth and depth. To that end, we
welcome papers addressing the following topics:


• Kosík in dialogue with other thinkers, such as Hegel, Marx, Labriola, Gramsci,
Lukács, Heidegger, Marcuse, Popper, Gonseth, and Weber.
• Kosík ́s response to other currents of thought, especially phenomenology,
structuralism, existentialism, critical theory, and positivism.
• Kosík’s work in relation to other varieties of Marxist humanism.
• Dialectics of the Concrete in the context of Kosík ́s overall philosophical œuvre.
• Dialectics of the Concrete and its influence on political theory, aesthetics,
theology, cultural anthropology, sociology, pedagogy, and other fields.
• The reception and critique of Kosík ́s Dialectics of the Concrete in different parts
of the world, such as East-Central Europe; in Germany, Italy, Russia, and
Scandinavia; the Anglophone, Francophone, Hispanophone, and Lusophone
worlds; China, Japan, and other countries in Asia.

Papers addressing other topics related to Kosík's work are also welcome.

The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals – including a title and an abstract of
100 – 200 words – should be sent by 31 December 2013 to landa@flu.cas.cz. Submissions
must be in .doc or .rtf format. Notice of acceptance will be sent by 30 January 2014. A
conference fee of 100 Euros (60 Euros for students) will cover the costs of organising the
conference (including conference accessories and coffee breaks). Details about the method
of payment will be announced after abstract acceptance. The conference proceedings will be
published as a book in 2015.

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:59 AM | Comments (0)

CFA: Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Sovereignty and Representation in the Islamic World

Deadline: December 15, 2013

With the sponsorship of the Cornell University Society for the Humanities, the Department of Anthropology invites applications for a two-year Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship for academic years 2014/15 and 2015/16. Applicants’ work should focus on issues of sovereignty and representation as they intersect in the Islamic world from the 8th century to the present. New media have played a critical role in contemporary social movements, from digital forms such as twitter to analog forms such as cassette tapes. The same may be said of various forms of materiality since the initial spread of Islam. We thus seek a cutting-edge scholar working within any anthropological tradition--ethnographic, archaeological, historical--to explore the interdigitation of the aesthetic and the political. The Fellow will teach two courses each year: one lower and one upper division. Depending on expertise, the lower-level course would be the introductory course in sociocultural or archaeological anthropology, our Cultural Diversity and Contemporary Issues course, or a first-year writing seminar on a mutually agreed topic. The upper-level course would be a seminar aimed at seniors and graduate students on a topic related to the themes outlined above.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicants for the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship for the 2014/15-2015/16 academic years must have received the Ph.D. degree after September 2008. Mellon Fellowships are open to international applicants. Applicants who will have received the Ph.D. degree by June 30, 2014 are eligible. Applicants who do not have the Ph.D. in hand at the time of application must include a letter from the committee chair or department stating that the Ph.D. degree will be conferred before the term of the fellowship begins.

Application Procedures

Applicants should submit the following materials for consideration:

a curriculum vitae

a detailed statement of research interests

a writing sample

course proposals for the courses the Mellon Fellow will teach while in residence at Cornell

three letters of recommendation

Applications are due by December 15, 2013 to the address below; we encourage applicants to contact the Anthropology department if they will be attending the AAA meetings ( nr29@cornell.edu ).

Applications should be sent to:

Paula L. Epps-Cepero
Program Administrator
Society for the Humanities
Cornell University
27 East Avenue
Ithaca, NY 14853

Posted by jmkirsch at 11:55 AM | Comments (0)

September 12, 2013

CFP: Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, April 2014, Atlanta, GA

Deadline: January 15, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS
52th Annual Meeting
Southern Conference on Slavic Studies

Atlanta, GA

April 10-12, 2014
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: January 15, 2014

The Fifty-Second Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (SCSS) will be held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Downtown Atlanta, GA, April 10-12, 2014. The meeting will be hosted by Georgia State University. The SCSS is the largest of the regional Slavic and Eurasian Studies associations and its programs attract national and international scholarly participation. The purpose of SCSS is to promote scholarship, education, and in all other ways to advance scholarly interest in Russian, Soviet, East European, and Eurasian studies in the Southern region of the United States and nationwide. Membership in SCSS is open to all persons interested in furthering these goals.

Papers from all humanities and social science disciplines are welcome and encouraged, as is a focus on countries other than Russia/USSR. Papers and panels on all topics will be considered. The program committee is accepting panel and paper proposals until January 15, 2014. Whole panel proposals (chair, three papers, discussant) are preferred, but proposals for individual papers are also welcome. Whole panel proposals should include the titles of each individual paper as well as a title for the panel itself and identifying information (email addresses and institutional affiliations) for all participants. Proposals for individual papers should include paper title, email contact, institutional affiliation, and a brief (one paragraph) abstract to guide the program committee in the assembly of panels. If any AV equipment will be needed, the panel or paper proposals should indicate so when submitted. AV will be of limited availability and assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. Email (preferably) your proposals to Sharon Kowalsky at Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu, or send it by conventional post to:

Dr. Sharon Kowalsky
Department of History
Texas A&M University-Commerce
PO Box 3011
Commerce, TX 75429

For local arrangements or conference information other than the program, please contact Dr. Hugh Hudson, Georgia State University, hhudson@gsu.edu. For questions, proposals or other information regarding the program, please contact Sharon Kowalsky at Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu or 903-886-5627.

Posted by jmkirsch at 04:29 PM | Comments (0)

March 15, 2013

CFP: REGION: Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia


REGION is a peer-reviewed international journal that explores the
history and current political, economic, social, and cultural affairs
of the entire former Soviet bloc. In particular, the journal focuses
on various facets of transformation at the local and national levels
in the aforementioned regions, as well as the changing character of
their relationships with the rest of world in the context of
glocalization. The following topics are most prominently featured:

Regional identities in globalized societies
Communication and transmission of information
Migration and boundaries
Transition: politics, economy, society, and culture

Imagined territories: cyber space, urban vs. rural, center vs. periphery,
etc.
Inter-regional cooperation
Identities in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, memories, and nostalgia

This journal is distinguished from others in similar fields by its
(g)locally oriented perspective. This journal will regularly give a
certain portion of space to articles on concrete local issues written
by local Eurasianist scholars.

We are now receiving papers to be reviewed for publication in Vol. 2,
No. 2 and subsequent issues. There is no thematic constraint, so we
welcome any papers investigating various topics pertaining to the
history and current affairs of the Russian Federation, East Europe,
and Central Asia. As well as research papers, we also receive
reviews/review essays of books on topics falling into the given scope.
A brief guideline for submission of research papers/reviews/review
essays is given below:

Research Articles:
There is no absolute length requirement for manuscripts but the
preferred length is 8,000-10,000 words. An abstract of no more than
150 words should be provided at the beginning of the article. If
possible, manuscripts should be prepared in MS Word using Times New
Roman 12 point font. Double-space the abstract, manuscript, notes, and
indented quotations. Number pages consecutively.

Review Articles:
Review essays analyze in depth a discrete body of noteworthy secondary
works, should begin with a title and list of books under
consideration, with full bibliographical information. The preferred
length is 1,500-3,000 words.

Reviews are expected to contain a scholarly apparatus, although it
need not be extensive. The preferred length is 750-1,000 words. A
review should bear no title and begin with the bibliographic data of
the reviewed book.

Full submission guidelines and style sheet are available at the
homepage of the Slavica publishers,
http://www.slavica.com/journals/region/index.html

Posted by jmkirsch at 03:17 PM | Comments (0)