February 02, 2011

Friday at Noon: Mohd. Anis Md. Nor 2/18/11


Friday, February 18
12:00 – 1:30 pm EDT [UTC/GMT -4 hours]
1636 SSWB/International Institute
1080 S. University, Ann Arbor MI

This talk will be webcast live.
For more information and instructions, please email cseas@umich.edu
Free and open to the public

Mohd. Anis Md. Nor
University of Malaya
Magigal and Igal-jin of Bajau Kubang: Invoking Liminality for the Spirits of the Ancestors in Semporna, Sabah

Mag-igal (dancing) and Igal-Jin (dancing spirit bearer) are the liminal performative components of Magduwata, a healing ritual ceremony of the Bajau Kubang people in Semporna, East Malaysia. Liminality of the Magduwata ceremony amongst the Bajau Kubang is manifested through trance dancing at the conclusion of the ancestral-derived healing ceremony. The Magduwata ritual healing represents an example of Turner’s ‘social drama’ where unexplained sickness among family members is seen as a breach in the physical and metaphysical relationships of the living and the ancestral spirits. Performativity (performance is floated freely) in Magduwata as ritual participants perform in the matrix of space and audience, liminalises the constructs of hierarchy in the social structure of the Bajau Kubang’s family, altering time and space that is not part of the legal convention ( extra legal) that happens outside the familiar. It is both strange and estrange. Dancing by participants and dancing-spirit-bearer is both a ‘social drama’ in the Turnerian sense as well as a liminal event in the performative sense.

Co-sponsor: School of Music, Theater and Dance; Center for World Performance Studies

Posted by katemw at 01:51 PM | Comments (0)

Friday at Noon: Charles Keith 2/11/11

Center for Southeast Asian Studies Public Lecture Series
12:00 – 1:30 pm EDT [UTC/GMT -4 hours]
1636 SSWB/International Institute
1080 S. University, Ann Arbor MI
This talk will be webcast live.
For more information and instructions, please email cseas@umich.edu
Free and open to the public

Charles Keith
Michigan State University
‘National Religion’ and its Others in Colonial Vietnam

This paper explores the connections between modern sectarian identity and colonial policy in Vietnam. During the 1920s and 1930s, Vietnamese intellectuals advancing a unitary, orthodox vision of Vietnamese religion found common cause with colonial officials attracted by this vision's conservative and hierarchical message. This paper explores the effects of this development on the Catholic community, one with a long and fraught history in Vietnam. It argues that the spread of a canonical understanding of national civilization and tradition, through state-sponsored cultural projects and curricula as well as religious writings, had a paradoxical effect. While the importance of colonial policy in supporting and disseminating these ideas intensified growing rifts between Catholics and the French, the ideas were also a principal source for growing understandings of Catholics as culturally and politically exterior to Vietnamese nationhood. The paper concludes with a brief consideration of the effects of this on the place of Catholics in revolutionary politics and on post-colonial sectarian relations.

Posted by katemw at 01:48 PM | Comments (0)

Friday at Noon: James Hoesterey 2/4/11


Center for Southeast Asian Studies Public Lecture Series
In 2010-2011 celebrating 50 years as a center and more than a century of academic engagement with Southeast Asia at the University of Michigan
Free and open to the public
Friday,February 4
1636 SSWB/International Institute
12:00-1:30pm 1080 South University Avenue
James Hoesterey
Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Islamic Studies, Lake Forest College

Shaming the State: Pop preachers, Psikologi Islami, and the Anti-Pornography Campaign in Indonesia

The anti-pornography bill – eventually passed into law in 2008 – was one of the most divisive pieces of legislation in post-authoritarian Indonesia. Opponents of the bill bemoaned the Islamization of Indonesia, whereas those in favor lamented the degradation of national morality. From his public pulpit, celebrity TV preacher cum pop psychologist Abdullah Gymnastiar admonished politicians for not having any shame. During television programs, congressional testimonies, and public rallies to support the anti-pornography legislation, Gymnastiar summoned government officials to heal the Indonesian state through an Islamic Psychology – or Psikologi Islami -- that depends on shame as a productive social and moral force. In this paper I explore how the burgeoning industry of Psikologi Islami invokes a politics of affect that redefines the moral and religious commitments of state officials and citizen-believers.

Posted by katemw at 01:45 PM | Comments (0)

Martin Manalansan, 1/31/11

Monday, January 31
4:00-6:00 pm
2239 Lane Hall
Martin Manalansan
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne
The House We Live in: Queer Habitations in the 21st Century
This presentation reports ethnographic micro-study of a household inhabited by unrelated mostly undocumented queers of color in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens, New York City. It examines particular forms of sociality that shape how lives are embodied and how bodies are lived amidst cramped quarters and a dwindling world of opportunities. The analysis revolves around the ideas of precarity and stasis and the (im)possibilities of triumphalist futures and unbridled optimism.

Martin Manalansan is a sociocultural anthropologist interested in framing issues of gender and sexuality within processes of globalization and transnationalism. Additionally, he is interested in food, modernity, and urban life. His book, Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (2003), is a critical ethnography of Filipino gay men living in New York. He is currently at work on two Philippine-based projects, one on return migration of Filipinos from various parts of the world, and the other on Manila and contemporary productions of urban modernity. Martin Manalansan is the editor of Cultural Compass: Ethnographic Explorations of Asian America (2000), and co-editor of Queer Globalizations: Citizenship and the Afterlife of Colonialism (2002).

and

Workshop on Philippine Films with Martin Manalansan
Monday, January 31
12:00 pm-2:00pm
2239 Lane Hall
Professor Manalansan workshops his paper, Servicing the World Flexible Filipino and the Unsecured Life, on two films, the documentary Paper Dolls and Servis. Films and paper available prior to workshop. Please contact Victor Mendoza for details (vmendoza@umich.edu).

Sponsors: Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Department of Women’s Studies, Lesbian, Gay, Queer Research Initiative, CSEAS.


Posted by katemw at 01:41 PM | Comments (0)