July 04, 2010

Design and Methodology Report & Other Details

Design and Methodology Report
http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/survey_methodology/acs_design_methodology.pdf
This document describes the basic ACS design and methodology as of the 2007 data collection year. The purpose of this document is to provide data users and other interested individuals with documentation of the methods used in the ACS. Future updates of this report are planned to reflect additional design and methodology changes. This document is organized into 15 chapters. Each chapter includes an overview, followed by detailed documentation, and a list of references.

Technical Appendix
Technical Appendix from the ACS Compass Products

Data Collection & Processing
http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/survey_methodology/acs_design_methodology_ch13.pdf
Chapter 13 of the ACS Design and Methodology Report discusses how aggregated data products and PUMS are prepared. For more help, see the entire report, or other individual chapters, at this link:
http://www.census.gov/acs/www/methodology/methodology_main/

Group Quarters Definitions
http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/documentation_main/

What the ACS can tell us about Mixed Mode Surveys
http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/dis/workshop/references/ISRMixedMode.pdf
This is a presentation given by Deborah Griffin, Census Bureau, at a joint SRC/PSC brownbag. It has a great deal of information on the details of the different modes of data collection (mail, phone, in-person); differences in response across the country; mode effects, etc.


Posted by lisan at 09:23 AM | Comments (0)

June 25, 2010

Statistical Links

Technical Issues (mostly statistical) Associated with the ACS
[PowerPoint presentation]

Appendices associated with each ACS Compass product

SAS code for using Replicate Weights
Statistical packages such as stata can handle replicate weights to produce standard errors and tests of significance. However, for the ACS and CPS, the replicate weights are based on a successive difference model rather than a jack-knife or generalized linear model. No statistical package handles successive difference models as an option.

Thus, one has to go through the actual algorithm to produce standard errors based on the successive difference replicate weights. The following program provides the code for this:

SAS code for using replicate weights

Replicate Weights
Garrett, B. Dale and Michael Starsinic. 2008. "ACS Public Use Microdata Samples of 2005 and 2006 - How to Use Replicate Weights." Presentation at AAPOR Conference, New Orleans, May 16, 2008.

Theoretical basis for successive difference model is:
Fay, R. and Train, G. 1995 "Aspects of Survey and Model-Based Postcensal Estimation of Income and Poverty Characteristics for States and Counties," Proceedings of the Section on Government Statistics, American Statistical Association, pp. 154-159.

Posted by sbriske at 01:51 PM | Comments (0)