October 16, 2013

IASTE 2014: Call for Abstracts, "Whose Tradition?"


“Whose Tradition?” is the theme of the fourteenth conference of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Environments (IASTE) to be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from December 14-17,
2014. In examining themes of authorship and subjectivity, this conference will seek to uncover in what manner, for what reason, by whom, to what effect, and during what intervals traditions have been deployed with regard to the built environment.

Our current period of globalization has led to the flexible reinterpretation of traditions via the mass media for reasons of power and profit. A proliferation of environments adopt traditional forms of one place and period in a
completely different contextual setting, while new design traditions may privilege image over experience. At the same time, the advent of new mobile technologies with the power to compress and distort
traditional configurations of space and time has allowed for the flourishing of new, empowering practices. Such practices have led to new traditions of urban resistance and uprisings that travel fluidly
between such diverse locales as São Paolo and Istanbul, Madrid and Cairo, and give voice to certain populations previously excluded. Questions of power, the other, and changing configurations of time and
space will open up discussions of the ways in which traditional practices shape the histories and futures of built environments. Papers will explore the following themes: Who: Power and the
Construction of Traditions; What: Place and the Anchoring of Traditions; Where: Mobility and the Reimagination of Traditions.

Scholars from relevant disciplines are invited to submit a 500-word
abstract and short biography by February 17, 2014. Submission details
are available online at: http://iaste.berkeley.edu/

Inquiries should be directed to:
IASTE 2014 Conference, Center for Environmental Design Research,
390 Wurster Hall #1839,
University of California, Berkeley, CA
94720-1839, USA.
Phone: 510.642.6801
fax:510.643.5571
e-mail: iaste@berkeley.edu

IASTE is an academic, non-profit association based at the University of California, Berkeley since 1988, and its activities have included the publication of a semi-annual journal, Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, and an ongoing Working Paper Series.

Posted by maclachm at 12:11 PM | Comments (0)

2014 APSA MENA Workshops: Call For Proposals

Workshop Leaders for the 2014 APSA MENA Workshop

Deadline: 5:00 PM (EST), November 11, 2013

The American Political Science Association (APSA) is pleased to announce a call for proposals
from political scientists interested in serving as co-leaders for the 2014 MENA Workshop program.
The program will be conducted as a series of two, related one-week sessions linked by a 3-4 month
break for writing, research, and mentorship. The first of the two workshops will take place in May
or June, with the follow-up workshop scheduled for August or September. The same leaders are
not required to lead both sessions. For a full description of the program and application process,
see the project website.

Background

The APSA MENA Workshops program is a multi-year collaboration in the Arab Middle East and North
African countries to enhance scholarly capacity and networking among early-career scholars. With support
from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, APSA is organizing a series of annual political science
workshops in cooperation with host universities across the region. Along with APSA’s Africa Workshop
program, the MENA Workshops constitute a major component of APSA’s efforts to engage political science
communities outside the United States and support research networks linking US scholars with their
colleagues overseas. The inaugural MENA workshop on “States in Transition, Constitutional Engineering and
Political Science Research” is currently scheduled to take place at the American University in Cairo (AUC)
from February 9-14, 2014.

Each workshop is led by a joint team of senior researchers from universities in the MENA region and the US
or Europe. Workshop leaders serve as academic directors of the program and will be responsible for designing
a unique syllabus and academic program that is structured around experienced and established partnerships.
This includes identifying a university or research institute in the MENA region to host the workshop.
Workshop administration and logistics will be led by APSA staff in conjunction with local host partners. A
modest honorarium will be provided and related expenses (meals, transportation, and lodging) will be
covered.

Each one-week program brings together approximately 20 PhD candidates and early-career scholars from
across the MENA region, plus several from the United States and Europe. Over the course of the program,
participants will receive training in basic research skills, engage in discussions of topical literature, present
and refine manuscripts for publication and build professional connections with other scholars. Participants
will be use the period between the two complementary sessions to further their own research with both
mentoring and small grant support. The working language of the program is English.

Application Instructions and Criteria

Leadership proposals should focus on the first of the two workshop sessions. Prospective leaders who may be
interested in leading the May/June session but not the August/September session are still encouraged to apply.
Following the inaugural workshops scheduled to take place at AUC next year, prospective co-leaders should
propose a non-Egyptian institutional partner for the 2014 MENA Workshop program. Leaders may propose
that both sessions be held at the same host institution, or identify two different partner organizations.

Workshop proposals may be submitted by a combination of Junior (assistant professor) and Senior scholars
(associate or full professor), however, the senior scholar must be the lead applicant. We welcome submissions
jointly by either:

A) Two political scientists based in the US/Europe together with two regionally-based scholars, B) Two
political scientists based in the US/Europe who commit to partnering with two regionally-based scholars


nominated by the MENA Project Steering Committee, or C) two regionally-based scholars who commit to
partnering with two political scientists in the US/Europe nominated by the MENA Project Steering
Committee. At least one of the team-members must be based at the regional host institution.

Applications should be written in three sections:


I. Workshop Theme Proposal (1-2 pages)

Prospective co-leaders should specify a thematic focus for each one-week session (or for just the initial one-
week workshop if unable to lead both sessions), from which they will build a reading list and set the schedule
of events. The workshop theme proposal should provide a coherent intellectual foundation for the program.
Any research or substantive theme in political science is welcome. Proposals should address how the theme
and methodological questions to be raised will achieve workshop goals and incorporate new developments in
the field and literature.


II. Substantive Leadership of the Workshop (2-3 pages)

In this section, applicants must provide detailed information on the following:


III. Supplementary Information (no page limit)

This section of the application should provide:


Application Timeline and Information

Applications should be submitted electronically to APSA in Microsoft Word format, 12-point font, and
double-spaced (except for Section III Supplementary Information, which can be single spaced). Send
applications to menaworkshops@apsanet.org by 5:00 PM Eastern Time on November 11, 2013. Selections
will be announced in December 2013. Prospective leadership teams interested in receiving feedback on their
proposal ideas are encouraged to reach out to APSA well before the submission deadline.

Contact Us: Send an email at menaworkshops@apsanet.org, or call Andrew Stinson at (202) 349-9364, if you have questions or would like more information about the workshops or application process.

Posted by maclachm at 11:58 AM | Comments (0)

September 09, 2013

Call for Proposals - Middle East Dialogue 2014


Middle East Dialogue 2014: Strategies for Change in the Middle East

The Policy Studies Organization (PSO) and The Digest of Middle East Studies (DOMES) invites you to submit a proposal for the Middle East Dialogue 2014 focused on Strategies for Change in the Middle East. The Dialogue will be held at the historic Whittemore House in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, February 27, 2014. The purpose of the conference is to promote dialogue about current policy concerns and to provide a civil space for discussion across the religious and political spectrum.

Proposals are encouraged to be sent in before the early deadline of November 30, 2013 for priority consideration, to PSO executive director Daniel Gutierrez-Sandoval at dgutierrezs@ipsonet.org. For more information, and to view past MED programs and videos, please visit: http://www.ipsonet.org/conferences/middle-east-dialogue.

The Policy Studies Organization publishes 18 journals and several book series on a variety of subjects. It promotes discussion of policy concerns and further research and dissemination of policy scholarship.

Posted by maclachm at 12:45 PM | Comments (0)

Call for Papers: Civil-Military Relations in Egypt

The Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) is currently inviting the submission of abstracts for research papers on civil-military relations in Egypt.

Academics and practitioners working in the security sector (armed forces, government, parliament, civil society, media and international governmental and non-governmental organisations) are invited to submit abstracts of maximum 600 words in English or Arabic by 30 September 2013 to opmena@dcaf.ch.


For more information, please visit Call for papers: Civil-military relations in Egypt.

Call_for_papers_final.pdf

Posted by maclachm at 11:52 AM | Comments (0)

September 04, 2013

Call for Papers: In whose interests? Exploring Middle East involvement in Africa

The Afro-Middle East Centre (AMEC) will convene an international conference from 5 to 6 November 2013 in Pretoria, South Africa, to examine the nature and extent of the penetration of Middle Eastern states into Africa. Potential presenters are invited to submit abstracts for consideration.

Abstract closing date: 15 September 2013
Decision date: 22 September 2013
Full paper Submission Date: 28 October 2013

About the conference:

The conference is framed within Africa’s history of colonialism and of African states and non-state actors being used as proxies on an African battlefield during the Cold War. It will explore the nature of the relationship that exists between both that of state and non-state actors on the continent and the Middle East. Aside from responding to the paucity in research around the penetration of the Middle East into Africa, and what this means for the continent, the conference further looks to explore ways of enhancing balanced and mutually beneficial relations between Africa and the Middle East region.

Africa’s colonial past and the implications of a postcolonial world defined by neoimperialism and neoliberalism continue to manifest in the socioeconomic reality of the majority of Africans. The recent assertiveness of Africa on the global stage, growing markets, diverse geography, geostrategic importance, and vast natural resources continue to attract the attention of global powers. China, for example, in its unquenchable quest for resources and global partners, turned its focus on Africa, and has succeeded in becoming the continent’s largest trading partner. The past three decades have, however, also seen the entry of new players into Africa, such as India and Brazil. Some of these states share experiential colonial histories as well as similar development experiences and challenges with countries on the continent. This interaction has facilitated the emergence of South coalition blocs such as the India, Brazil, South Africa (IBSA) Dialogue Forum, to promote cooperation amongst these states.

In a postcolonial era, however, the attention that Africa attracts is uneven, sometimes paternalistic, and often under the guise of development, aid and humanitarian assistance. This has often seen the evolution of asymmetrical political and economic relations between African states and these external powers.

Of course, Africa is not a singular monolithic and homogeneous entity. On the whole, however, it has often been the disadvantaged partner in exploitative relationships.

Scope:

Middle East in Africa

Apart from states that are well-known for their involvement in Africa, such as the USA, China, Brazil and India, the continent has also been targeted by a number of states whose role has garnered relatively little attention. These include states from the Middle East whose strategic involvement in, and outreach to, Africa range from extending their sphere of influence to pursuing ideological interests, and includes economic, business, political, military and religious relations. In particular, Israel, Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and other Gulf states have set their sights on Africa. Certain non-state actors from the Middle East have also looked to Africa to export their ideologies. This manifests in diverse forms: from religious and ideological education projects to involvement in civil or interstate conflict, such as in the Sahel region and Somalia.

Relations between the Middle East and Africa have a long history going back centuries. This has seen beneficial as well exploitative exchanges for Africa. Due to their geographical, cultural and religious proximity to Africa, there is a centuries-old flow of people, ideologies, and sociopolitical undercurrents from countries in the Middle East into Africa, particularly North Africa, East Africa and the Sahel region.

The objectives of the various Middle Eastern countries involved in Africa are numerous, diverse, yet also converge as they jostle to increase their dominance over each other. Due to Iran’s global isolation, Iran sees resonance in Africa, with the continent’s own experience of marginalisation. Africa thus holds the potential to reduce the isolation forced on Iran by western sanctions. Turkey’s revitalised foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party (AKP) has seen it extending its global influence. Since 2002, Africa has become part of its revamped foreign policy that looks to see Ankara develop and strengthen ties with countries which Turkey previously had neglected. Today, Turkey has the largest foreign diplomatic and business components in Somalia compared to any other state. With the world’s attention drawn to Israel’s continued occupation of Palestinian lands, Israel has attempted to win favour from African countries through its use of soft power under the guise of development, and the sharing of agricultural and technological expertise. Israel has also recently agreed to provide certain African states with assistance in exchange for the transfer of African refugees from Israel. Tiny Qatar, aside from seeing the opportunities that the continent’s physical expansiveness offers, hopes to extend its global clout and sphere of influence through Africa. This has seen it involved in mediation in African conflicts, for example between Sudan and Darfur rebels. It has also attempted to insert its influence through involvement in the NATO-led overthrow of Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi.

Paper and Abstracts: AMEC invites submissions of abstracts from people that might be interested in presenting a paper at this conference on the issues discussed here.

Prospective paper titles and abstracts must be in English, and may be emailed to Nazlie Jada at nazlie@amec.org.zaby no later than 15 September 2013. Abstracts should not be more than 200 words in length, attached to the email, and in ‘.odt’, ‘.doc’, or ‘.docx’ formats.

If your abstract is accepted, AMEC will expect an original paper submitted prior to the conference. Papers should be between 4 000 and 6 000 words in length, and conform to AMEC’s style guide, which will be provided to authors on the acceptance of an abstract. It is hoped that papers will be published in an edited volume after the conference.

The cost of flights to Johannesburg and accommodation during the conference for speakers will be covered by AMEC.

About the Afro-Middle East Centre (AMEC):

AMEC is a Johannesburg based think tank that looks to understand and enhance relations between Africa, particularly South Africa, and the Middle East and North Africa region. AMEC seeks to shape public discourse and engage decision makers on issues affecting the region. It further looks to produce and disseminate the highest quality of research on the Middle East, and on issues related to the Middle East and North Africa.

For more information visit http://www.amec.org.zaor email info@amec.org.za.

Posted by maclachm at 12:33 PM | Comments (0)

February 11, 2013

Call for Proposals - Language Symposium 2013

We encourage you to submit a proposal for the annual Language Symposium 2013 co-sponsored by Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago, and DePaul University. Language instructors at all levels (high school and college/university-level) as well as researchers are invited to submit proposals; all languages are welcome.
This year's symposium topic is "World Languages and the Roles They Play in Academia" and will be hosted by Northwestern University (Evanston campus) on April 12-13, 2013. Our keynote speaker will be Rosemary Feal, Executive Director of the MLA.
For more information, please check out our website: http://languagesymposium.northwestern.edu/
For a direct link to the submission info, please go to: http://languagesymposium.northwestern.edu/request-for-proposals/
Presentations will be twenty minutes long, plus ten minutes for discussion.
Proposed topics may include/ be related to:
The place of global languages across the science and liberal arts curriculum
The link between foreign languages and the global citizen
Multilingualism
Multiculturalism
Cultural competence
Interdisciplinary approaches in language learning and teaching
Promotion of team-taught courses with a foreign language component
Service learning
Language for special purposes
Quantification of learning outcomes

Deadline: February 14, 2013 at midnight.
Early registration deadline: Sunday, March 31st, 2013
And please, do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions: symposium@mmlc.northwestern.edu

Posted by ksosnows at 11:47 AM | Comments (0)

Call for Papers - Middle East History and Theory Conference

Call for Papers
28th Annual Middle East History and Theory (MEHAT) Conference, University of Chicago, May 3-5, 2013

We are pleased to invite students and faculty to submit papers for the 28th Annual Middle East History and Theory Conference, to be held May 3rd to 5th, 2013, at the University of Chicago.

We welcome a broad range of submissions from across the disciplines, including (but not limited to) anthropology, art history, cinema and media studies, economics, history, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, sociology, or any other topic concerning the Middle East from the advent of Islam to the present day.

Those wishing to participate should send a 250-word abstract to the conference organizers at mehat.chicago@gmail.com by February 15, 2013. We will accept both individual papers and prearranged themed panels; the latter is especially encouraged.

More information about the conference and submission process can be viewed at our Conference page: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/mehat/conference/.

Posted by ksosnows at 11:43 AM | Comments (0)

Call for Papers

Call for Papers: Graduate Workshop in Ottoman Studies at the University of Oxford, May 11th, 2013


Rethinking the Long 19th Century in the Ottoman Empire


The Ottoman Studies Group at Oxford (OSGO), in cooperation with Ertegun House and the Middle East Center (MEC) at St. Antony’s College, is organizing a one-day graduate workshop in Ottoman Studies at the University of Oxford on May 11th, 2013. This one-day workshop aims to provide a forum for graduate students who focus on the Ottoman Empire from the late 18th to the early 20th century to present their research, exchange ideas and develop scholarly networks. Keynote speaker Professor Benjamin Fortna will open the workings of this workshop.

We invite applications by all graduate students, who work in the humanities and social sciences. We particularly welcome applications that explore new approaches to Ottoman Studies in the following themes:

- Policies and reforms

- Global transference of knowledge / intellectual history

- Identity (ethnic, religious, gender, etc.)

- Culture

Presentations should be approximately 15 minutes.

Please send your proposal (max. 300 words) for a paper along with your CV to OSGO2013@gmail.com, stating your university, department, degree you are studying for, the year you are in and contact details in your e-mail message.


The deadline for submitting an abstract is Friday, March 8th, 2013.

Notifications of acceptance will be sent out within three weeks of the abstract submission deadline.

The exact programme of the workshop will be announced by April 12th, 2013.

For additional information, please, contact us at OSGO2013@gmail.com

Location: Ertegun House
St. Giles 37A
Oxford
http://www.ox.ac.uk/ertegun/

Posted by ksosnows at 11:38 AM | Comments (0)

January 30, 2013

Call for Applications


The History of Climate Change and the Future of Global Governance
Department of History, Columbia University
New York City, May-August 2013

The Hertog Global Strategy Initiative (HGSI) seeks talented undergraduate and graduate students for its 2013 seminar on the History of Climate Change and the Future of Global Governance.

HGSI is a research program that explores how the world community has responded to planetary threats to derive lessons that will help us take on the challenges of the present and the future. Each summer, a select group of students from across the nation comes to Columbia University for three months to work with leading scholars and policymakers. This year's initiative hopes to train a new generation of researchers and leaders who understand both the development of climate science and the changing nature of world politics.

The 2013 seminar will be taught by Matthew Connelly, Professor of History at Columbia University, and Jim Fleming, Professor of Science, Technology, and Society at Colby College. They will be assisted in the classroom by Deborah Coen, Paul Edwards, Mike Hulme, Bill McKibben, Gavin Schmidt, and nearly a dozen other leaders in the field.

Participants pursue original research both independently and in teams. Students will receive eight credit points for the seminar, the equivalent of two semester-long courses at Columbia.

For more information about the program or to submit an application, visit globalstrategy.columbia.edu. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter. Please direct any further questions to globalstrategy@columbia.edu or 212-854-9854.

Application Deadline: March 5, 2013

Posted by ksosnows at 11:36 AM | Comments (0)

January 14, 2013

Call for Papers

Would you like to submit to
FOUNDATIONS?

Although we are a history journal, we recognize that students from cognate fields of study write historical papers that would fall under our scope and we are trying to expand our contacts with various university departments. We are looking for creative, well-written independent research papers. We are also interested in exploring audio/visual submissions, such as documentaries, to publish on our website.

Foundations is now accepting submissions. All papers must
meet the following criteria:
• Must have been written while pursuing an undergraduate degree.
Papers written as an undergraduate may be submitted until two years
past the month of graduation.
• International submissions are accepted but all submissions must be
written in English.
• Must have a historical theme (includes anthropology, art history,
classics, economics, political science, etc.)
• Must be unpublished.
• Must employ primary sources.
• Must be typed in 12-point Times New Roman font,
• double-spaced, and titled.
• Must be between 15 and 70 pages, not including endnotes.
Please submit all papers as e-mail attachments along with an abstract no longer than 100 words in Microsoft Word document format to
foundations@jhu.edu. All papers are accepted on a rolling basis throughout the academic year and the summer. Authors are kindly requested to provide the following data in the body of the e-mail, not in the manuscript: name, school attended, graduation year, and e-mail address.

Foundations is an international academic undergraduate
history journal published biannually.
Visit http://www.jhu.edu/foundations for more information.

Posted by ksosnows at 02:01 PM | Comments (0)

January 11, 2013

Call for Papers

The graduate students of the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine, invite submissions for its annual conference:

The Laboring Body
University of California, Irvine
Friday, March 15, 2013
Humanities Gateway 1030

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/ucicomplitgradconference/

Keynote Speaker: Nathan Brown, University of California, Davis

The last several years of global economic meltdown have reinvigorated public debate around the mechanisms of capitalism, particularly as people recognize their role in sustaining the system that exploits them. Organized labor, as well as those outside of the workforce (whether unemployed, homeless, or laboring in shadow economies), have played an important role in the Occupy movement and in uprisings in the Arab world, Europe, and elsewhere. Meanwhile, budget cuts and other austerity measures, as well as the general climate of crisis within the humanities and within public education as a whole, has produced a critical moment for student movements and academic workers throughout the world. While heterogeneous in their practices and conditions, these movements nonetheless share in common that they each have begun to organize the laboring body as a political force at the same time as it organizes itself. Recent theoretical work by thinkers such as David Harvey, Paolo Virno and Antonio Negri, to name just a few, has re- examined the role of labor, particularly as understood in the context of biopolitics.

This conference would like to address the ways in which politics is manifest at the level of labor embodied. In other words, how are bodies organized and self-organized within the system of labor at this most recent (neoliberal) stage of capitalism and the crises it currently faces? In what ways is the notion of labor being transformed when the body is no longer put to the service of capital but instead actively works against it? How do living relationships between knowledge and labor disrupt systems which create liberal conceptualizations of responsibility modeled on notions of labor, indebtedness and contractual obligation? How is labor aestheticized, and in what ways do myths or allegories of labor construct theories or reinforce ideologies of how bodies work (or are worked)? We invite papers from all who are engaged with questions of labor embodied, whether through politics, philosophy, critical theory, art, literature, film, science studies, culture or pedagogy, with a special emphasis on interdisciplinary work.

More specific topics include but are not limited to:
Labor and bodies at work in philosophy
Migration of labor (across space, discipline, time...)
Im/materiality of labor and the laboring body
Slave, multitude, collectivity, peoples, commune, individual
Gendering and racializing of laboring bodies
Reproduction (by bodies, of bodies, through bodies...)
Myths and allegories of labor and the body at work
Employment and unemployment
Free time, leisure, the labored/laboring body at rest
Resistance, occupation, the body politic, the masses

We welcome abstracts of 250-300 words, to be submitted to thelaboringbody@gmail.com no later than January 13, 2013. Submissions are especially welcome from those positioned outside the university (community organizers, independent scholars, recent or not-so-recent graduates, artists, and others). Presentations are to be 20 minutes in length. Please include your name, email address, departmental affiliation, institution, and phone number with your abstract. A limited amount of travel funds may be made available to out-of-town participants.

Keynote Bio: Nathan Brown's research and teaching focus on 20th and 21st century poetry and poetics, continental philosophy, science/technology studies, and recent communist theory. He has completed a book manuscript titled The Limits of Fabrication: Materials Science and Materialist Poetics and is now at work on a second book project titled Absent Blue Wax: Rationalist Empiricism in Contemporary French Philosophy. Nathan's recent writing and teaching focus on communist theory and on realigning cultural and political-economic periodization during late modernity. He has also been actively engaged in the UC struggle against the privatization of the university.


::

The Department of Comparative Literature
243 Humanities Instructional Building
University of California
Irvine, CA 92697-2651
thelaboringbody@gmail.com
https://sites.google.com/site/ucicomplitgradconference/

Posted by ksosnows at 01:34 PM | Comments (0)

December 17, 2012

Call for Papers

The Middle East and North Africa Graduate Student Organization at the University of Arizona

13th Annual Southwest Graduate Conference in Middle Eastern and North African Studies

CALL FOR PAPERS

Invitation

The Middle East and North Africa Graduate Student Organization (MENA), the Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES), and the School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies (MENAS) at the University of Arizona cordially invite you to participate in the 13th Annual Southwest Graduate Conference in Middle Eastern and North African Studies to be held from Wednesday, April 03, 2013 to Friday, April 05, 2013 in Tucson, Arizona.

Objectives

This conference aims to strengthen ties between academic disciplines, provide a platform for graduate students to present their research projects, exchange ideas, and create a network of emerging scholars spanning a variety of fields. For this reason, we encourage abstract submissions not only from students within Middle Eastern Studies programs, but also from disciplines such as Anthropology, Economics, Education, Gender & Women’s Studies, Geography, History, Law, Linguistics, Literature, Music Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Public Health, Religious Studies, etc.

Paper Topics

Applicants are encouraged to submit pre-organized panel proposals. Proposals for individual papers are also welcome. Select papers may be published in the group’s online journal, Zaytoon. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:



Human Rights
Media & Visual Arts
Environment
Colonialism
Art & Architecture
Minorities
Diasporas
Nationalism
Peace & Security Studies
Social Movements
Pedagogy
Dance & Performative Arts


Submission Guidelines

Paper abstract submissions are due Thursday, December 13, 2012 for international students (requiring a visa) and Thursday, January 17, 2013 for others. Abstracts must be 250 words or less and submitted as a Microsoft Word or PDF file. Non-standard fonts should be embedded in the PDF format. Abstracts must be anonymous aside from paper title and description and emailed to confuamena@gmail.com. In the body of this email, please include author name, school and department affiliation, phone number, and email address. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out within three weeks of the abstract submission deadline. For further information,
please visit http://menas.arizona.edu/mena-conference or submit your inquiries to confuamena@gmail.com.

Posted by ksosnows at 03:41 PM | Comments (0)

November 30, 2012

Trans-Scripts Journal seeking Paper Submissions

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Trans-Scripts, an interdisciplinary online journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences at UC Irvine
Volume III, Spring 2013: “Thinking Activism”

Trans-Scripts – an interdisciplinary online journal in the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine – invites graduate students to submit their work for publication. The theme of the third volume is “Thinking Activism.”

In The Location of Culture, Homi Bhabha reflects, “There are many forms of political writing whose different effects are obscured when they are divided between the „theoretical‟ and the „activist‟.” Scholars in the humanities and social sciences have long struggled to position their own subjective experiences and investments in relation to the scholarship they produce. Some choose to situate their research between two competing poles of theory and activism. Others, like Bhabha, argue against constructing an arbitrary distinction between the two, positing instead that scholarship is activism, and vice-versa.

Activism can take many forms; as an intellectual labor, it challenges current structures of knowledge production and has the potential to reinvent the university's role within and against the cultures that
sponsor it. To that end, we seek submissions in the humanities and social sciences that focus on the productive intersections of scholarship (what some might call “theory”) and activism (what some
might call “practice”), as well as submissions that address the differences between these two modes of thinking and doing. The popular democratic protests of the last few years make it all the more crucial that we address the ways in which our own positionality or privilege is enabled by systems of power that actively work to dispossess people. It is important, now more than ever, for academic scholarship to address its relationship to activism, in an attempt to provide new meaning to the purpose and direction of academic research. The concerns outlined here have produced and are productive of critical
scholarship in a vast range of disciplines, including literature, law, medicine, rhetoric, anthropology, gender studies, sociology, English, economics, history, political science, and critical race studies, to name a few.

Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to:
 Historical or theoretical examinations of activist movements, strategies, and tactics
 Coalition building across time, space, and issue areas; transnational networks of scholars and activists
 Post-recession governmental austerity measures and their social effects
 The privatization of higher education and student (financial) dispossession in the United States as well as abroad, where student movements, like the Chilean student protests (2011-2012), continue to demand educational reform.
 Conservative activism (i.e. the Tea Party) and the academy
 Social media (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) and social justice
 Prison-Industrial Complex and/or Criminal Justice
 Police brutality, including the limits and potentialities of law enforcement reform
 Radical visions for peace and public safety
 Rhetoric and democratic participation
 Immigration policy and reform
 Sexual violence
 Gender (in)equality, particularly in light of recent attempts to legislate women's bodies and healthcare in the United States, as well as its instantiations in different local contexts abroad.
 Marriage (in)equality, LGBT rights, and other homonormative forms of inclusion
 Significant budget cuts to social services, like those we have seen in the UK
 Religious discrimination and violence
 The relationship between text and critic
 The move towards public writing in Composition Studies
 Anthropology‟s reflexive turn and other questions regarding the ethics of participantobservation (ethnography)
 Action-research methodologies
 Poverty and homelessness, particularly in light of recession-era global increases
 Death penalty debates
 Affirmative Action debates
 The personal as political, and other phenomenological extensions of feminist theory
 Protest as performance (and vice versa)
 Identity politics and its critiques
 Medical-Industrial Complex and/or Patient Advocacy
 Ability as a category of analysis/ The rise of Disability Studies
 Public space and free speech
 Critical Pedagogy and its discontents
 An examination of what is or should be the relationship between the community and the
university
 Broad trends of anti-intellectualism or (conversely) academic exceptionalism
 Academic publication and the public sphere (i.e. academic freedom in publicly-funded
universities)
 Thought crimes – the (literal) policing of radical ideology, both inside and outside of institutionalized educational environments

Trans-Scripts welcomes all submissions that engage topics related to activist-scholarship or activism more broadly. They may, but certainly need not, address the examples listed above. Submissions need not conform to any disciplinary or methodological criteria. They need only be original, well researched, and properly cited in MLA style. English language contributions from all universities in all countries will be considered. In addition, we welcome contributions from independent scholars who are not affiliated with any formal institution.

Faculty Contributors
In addition to selected student work, renowned academics will contribute editorial pieces, offering students the chance to place their work in conversation with experts in various fields. Past
contributors have included Étienne Balibar, Hortense Spillers, Lee Edelman, and Roderick Ferguson.

Submission Guidelines and Review Process
The deadline for submission is January 1, 2013. All submissions should be written in English. The total word count should be between 3,000 and 12,000 words, including footnotes. Explanatory footnotes should be kept to a minimum. Submissions should employ the MLA style of citation (for further information on the journal‟s submission guidelines and mission statement, see the journal website at http://www.humanities.uci.edu/collective/hctr/transscripts/index.html).

All pieces should be submitted as a Word document attached in an email to transscriptsjournal@gmail.com. The email should include your name, institution (if you have one), program/department, and an email address at which you can be contacted. Please also include a short abstract of less than 300 words describing the content and argument of the piece.

Posted by ksosnows at 01:32 PM | Comments (0)

November 09, 2012

Call for papers!

The Middle East and North Africa Graduate Student Organization at the University of Arizona

13th Annual Southwest Graduate Conference in Middle Eastern and North African Studies

CALL FOR PAPERS

Invitation

The Middle East and North Africa Graduate Student Organization (MENA), the Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES), and the School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies (MENAS) at the University of Arizona cordially invite you to participate in the 13th Annual Southwest Graduate Conference in Middle Eastern and North African Studies to be held from Wednesday, April 03, 2013 to Friday, April 05, 2013 in Tucson, Arizona.

Objectives

This conference aims to strengthen ties between academic disciplines, provide a platform for graduate students to present their research projects, exchange ideas, and create a network of emerging scholars spanning a variety of fields. For this reason, we encourage abstract submissions not only from students within Middle Eastern Studies programs, but also from disciplines such as Anthropology, Economics, Education, Gender & Women’s Studies, Geography, History, Law, Linguistics, Literature, Music Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Public Health, Religious Studies, etc.

Paper Topics

Applicants are encouraged to submit pre-organized panel proposals. Proposals for individual papers are also welcome. Select papers may be published in the group’s online journal, Zaytoon. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:



Human Rights
Media & Visual Arts
Environment
Colonialism
Art & Architecture
Minorities
Diasporas
Nationalism
Peace & Security Studies
Social Movements
Pedagogy
Dance & Performative Arts


Submission Guidelines

Paper abstract submissions are due Thursday, December 13, 2012 for international students (requiring a visa) and Thursday, January 17, 2013 for others. Abstracts must be 250 words or less and submitted as a Microsoft Word or PDF file. Non-standard fonts should be embedded in the PDF format. Abstracts must be anonymous aside from paper title and description and emailed to confuamena@gmail.com. In the body of this email, please include author name, school and department affiliation, phone number, and email address. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out within three weeks of the abstract submission deadline. For further information,
please visit http://menas.arizona.edu/mena-conference or submit your inquiries to confuamena@gmail.com.

Posted by ksosnows at 03:01 PM | Comments (0)

Call for papers!

SHARING CULTURES 2013 3rd International Conference on Intangible Heritage
July 24-26, 2013 * Aveiro * Portugal

Organised by: Green Lines Institute for Sustainable Development

Conference Overview

Sharing Cultures 2013 - 3rd International Conference on Intangible Heritage follows the path established by the previous Conference on Intangible Heritage (Sharing Cultures 2009 and 2011) and aims at pushing further the discussion on Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH), under the main topics proposed by the UNESCO Convention adding some new field of discussion, namely on what concerns management and promotion of ICH, educational matters and musealization (please refer to the list of Topics).

The concept of ICH gained its rightful place among the scientific community during the last decade and a significant amount of work has been done by a large number of researchers, academics and practitioners, leading to the recognition of ICH as fundamental piece for the comprehension of human societies, organisations and ways of living. Accordingly, scientific events that gather scholars, researchers and academics with on-going work on ICH are privileged moments to share experiences, problems, questions and conclusions. Sharing Cultures 2013 aims at being one of those events.

As in its previous edition, Sharing Cultures 2013 will include a number of workshops promoting some hands-on experience to all Delegates who will have the opportunity to learn traditional know-how from its owners and practitioners.

SHARING CULTURES 2013 is a peer reviewed conference.

Visit the conference website for full details about the conference scope, topics and submission procedures at:
http://www.sc2013.greenlines-institute.org

Abstract Submission

Submit an abstract via the conference website: http://www.sc2013.greenlines-institute.org or contact the Conference Secretariat below.

Topics

· Oral traditions and expressions

· Performing arts

· Social practices

· Traditional craftsmanship

· Management and promotion of Intangible Cultural Heritage

· Intangible Cultural Heritage and education

· Musealization of Intangible Cultural Heritage

· 08- Special Chapter: Maritime Intangible Cultural Heritage

Conference Secretariat

Secretariat SHARING CULTURES 2012
Green Lines Institute for Sustainable Development
Av. Alcaides de Faria, 377 S12
4750-106 Barcelos, PORTUGAL
Telephone: + 351 253 815 037
Email: sc2013@greenlines-institute.org

Posted by ksosnows at 02:55 PM | Comments (0)