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October 29, 2007

Arts & Minds - an event for everyone

Understanding the physiology of the brain may not sufficiently map what occurs during creative acts. A physiological understanding of creativity may not yet be available to us, yet there's no denying that creativity occurs in the mind.

The Arts & Minds event --free and open to the public, but registration is required; I hope that some of you will participate--

will, in part, explore interfaces between the science of the brain and the making of art, a product of the brain still defying certain kinds of quantification.

Please join us in the mapping of this exploration.



(image from Mizzou News where you can read the article Shaping the Brain)
_________________________________

Important Update:

A link to Nick's response to the impact of only the first third (all he was able to attend) of the Arts and Brain session.

This quote is from Nick's post about attending the event:

"On November 1st, I was able to skip out of part of another class and experience about the first hour and a half of Arts and the Brain. I hope that many people from our class were able to attend, because never before have I seen a more accurate display of a 'fluid' map. Watching the interactions unfold was amazing.

Background

Imagine the visual studio, set up with mirrors in the middle creating pathways for people to pass through, projection screens on each wall, displaying both preselected imagines and a current map of what was going on taken from above, and music playing in the background. The people interacting and moving among the mirrors were all wearing white caps, so when looking at the projection screen with the video being taken from above, the identity of the individuals was hard to distinguish. What did differentiate people though, was the reaction to the environment that they were placed in. People reacted differently to the music, some chose to dance, some let it dictate they pace that they moved among the mirrors, and still others seemed to not be affected by the music at all. It was also extremely interesting to see how the people reacted to one another. Some people let the others in front of them control the pace that they walked at, while other chose to walk at their own pace through the 'map' and walk around and amongst people that were taking in their surrounding environment at their own pace.

Watching this amazing visual display sparked a flurry of thoughts about how this related to both poetry and the mapping of all different types of poams. My immediate reaction was that this was probably the best 'map' that I had seen that addressed the problems of differing interpretations of a poam depending on the individual. Since the people who were interacting were part of the map, their reactions to their environment was captured and could visually be seen. The thing that I realized and discussed about my map of The Lightning is a yellow Fork was that my map meant something to me, and had quite a bit of meaning, but could have held no significance to anyone else. This is what made Arts and the Brain so interesting, that the participants reactions to their changing environment was the thing that was captured as the map. The idea was for the map to be fluid, and constantly changing, which it was.

The handout from the demonstration also aimed toward the same purpose, from my perspective. The map was initially small, but when opened, folded out to show the different parts of the diagram. It aimed toward distinguishing the different parts of the presentation, while tying them all together through the 'Arts and the Brain' topic. I wish that I had been able to view more of the presentation, because I was only able to see one part of the whole."

_________________________________

This is the Elements of Damage component of the video installation poam offered by Thylias Moss in the Arts & Brain session of the event:


FreeVideoCoding.com

(This video poam component may also be viewed at you tube and may both viewed and/or downloaded from the Limited Fork podcast.)

Posted by thyliasm at 07:10 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

The Active Map We Are

Of course I realize that although you are submitting your mapping (note that I did not say mapped) of The Red Wheelbarrow or The Lightning is a yellow Fork the need to map persists,

for we are all involved intensely in the mapping of our lives, in the mapping of meaning in our encounters, in the mapping of a 240 in which a relevance of poetry to the other aspects of our lives is established, that establishement constituting a map.

So we will use the metaphor of mapping to refer to journeys through poems
such as Elizabeth Bishop's The Fish
which accomplishes, among all else that it accomplishes, the mapping of a fish and the mapping of an encounter with a fish, and a mapping of the the outcomes (or impact) of that encounter with a fish. Note the level of specificity achieved without naming a species of fish.
Can the species of fish be determined based on the details the poem provides?

Perhaps these initial maps will be part of the atlas you submit at the end of the course.
(more about this context later)

I have done some mapping/remapping myself, and I invite you to explore these maps in the following links:
A Limited Forker Girl's Tines
Bifurcation Station
Limited Fork 101
Limited Fork Academic Split Tine, and
Tine D.A.D.A. Club

Happy mapping of your journey to and nabigation of these mapped tines.

Now for a fishy remapping:

I caught a tremendous fish and held him beside the boat half out of water, with my hook
fast in a corner of its mouth. He didn’t fight. He hadn’t fought at all. He hung a grunting weight,
battered and venerable and homely. Here and there his brown skin hung in strips
like ancient wallpaper, and its pattern of darker brown was like wallpaper:
shapes like full-blown roses stained and lost through age.

He was speckled with barnacles, fine rosettes of lime, and infested with tiny white sea-lice,
and underneath two or three rags of green weed hung down. While his gills were breathing in
the terrible oxygen — the frightening gills, fresh and crisp with blood, that can cut so badly —
I thought of the coarse white flesh packed in like feathers, the big bones and the little bones,
the dramatic reds and blacks of his shiny entrails, and the pink swim-bladder
like a big peony. I looked into his eyes which were far larger than mine but shallower, and yellowed,
the irises backed and packed with tarnished tinfoil seen through the lenses
of old scratched isinglass. They shifted a little, but not to return my stare.

— It was more like the tipping

of an object toward the light. I admired his sullen face, the mechanism of his jaw,
and then I saw that from his lower lip — if you could call it a lip — grim, wet, and weaponlike,
hung five old pieces of fish-line, or four and a wire leader with the swivel still attached,
with all their five big hooks grown firmly in his mouth. A green line, frayed at the end
where he broke it, two heavier lines, and a fine black thread
still crimped from the strain and snap when it broke and he got away.
Like medals with their ribbons frayed and wavering, a five-haired beard of wisdom
trailing from his aching jaw. I stared and stared and victory filled up
the little rented boat, from the pool of bilge where oil had spread a rainbow
around the rusted engine to the bailer rusted orange, the sun-cracked thwarts,
the oarlocks on their strings, the gunnels — until everything was rainbow, rainbow, rainbow!

And I let the fish go.


--Okay --we're establishing the importance of details in this discussion --yet an obvious detail is missing: catfish? rainbow trout? (etc)

Now for more about the importance of details, go here (a famous tale, popular in college intro expository writing classes --and in creative writing classes)


Now another reconfiguration as we fish for more blossoming of relationships between structure and meaning:

I caught a tremendous
fish
and held

him

beside the boat

half

out


of water, with my hook
fast in a corner

of its mouth.
He

didn’t fight.

He hadn’t fought
at all.
He hung a grunting weight,
battered
and venerable
and homely.
Here and there


his brown skin
hung in strips
like ancient wallpaper,
and its pattern of darker brown
was like wallpaper:

shapes like full-blown roses
stained and lost
through age.
He was speckled
with barnacles,
fine rosettes of lime,

and infested
with tiny white
sea-lice,
and underneath two or three
rags
of green weed
hung down.

While his gills were breathing in
the terrible oxygen

— the frightening gills,

fresh
and crisp with blood,
that can cut
so badly —

I thought of
the coarse white flesh
packed in like feathers,

the big bones
and the little bones,

the dramatic reds
and blacks
of his shiny entrails,

and the pink
swim-bladder

like a big peony.


I looked into his eyes

which were far
larger than mine
but shallower,
and yellowed,
the irises backed

and packed
with tarnished tinfoil

seen through the lenses
of old scratched isinglass.

They shifted a little,
but not
to return my stare.

— It was more like
the tipping of an object
toward the light.

I admired
his sullen face,
the mechanism

of his jaw,
and then I saw

that from his lower lip
— if you could call it a lip —

grim, wet, and weaponlike,
hung five old pieces

of fish-line,
or four

and a wire leader
with the swivel
still attached,

with all their five
big hooks
grown firmly
in his mouth.

A green line,
frayed at the end
where he broke it,
two heavier lines,
and a fine black thread

still crimped
from the strain and snap
when it broke
and he got away.
Like medals

with their ribbons
frayed and wavering,
a five-haired beard
of wisdom trailing

from his aching jaw.
I stared and stared

and victory filled up
the little rented
boat, from the pool

of bilge
where oil had spread
a rainbow
around the rusted
engine to the bailer rusted

orange, the sun-cracked
thwarts, the oarlocks
on their strings,
the gunnels
— until everything
was rainbow,
rainbow,
rainbow! And I let the fish go.

Posted by thyliasm at 04:59 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

October 25, 2007

A Fold in the Map, A Wrinkle in Time

Today is the anniversary of the death of Sadako at age twelve --her peace cranes are maps, each one; collectively they become a more powerful machine --when a thousanf paper cranes are present, they dominate, they become the context of reality, the "allness" of existence is both held by and shaped by their wings. For a brief time, she was an atomic bomb survivor in Hiroshima.

Please click here to watch the video poam "Hiroshima" by a student practitiioner of Limited Fork Poetics.

Please read Sadako's story here.

Please watch this video about her:

And please watch this video about her cranes
(as this interactive map extends, folding more into itself, and unfolds
enhanced versions, enriched versions of the journey):


Posted by thyliasm at 01:29 PM | Comments (6) | TrackBack

October 09, 2007

FIRST WORLD MAP of HAPPINESS: GET ON THE MAP!

While you're busy mapping and realizing how happy you are to be making map poams of an allness of a poem, check out first world Map of Happiness. Here's another article about the mapping of the quality of life, and here's a link to the questionnaire itself, in case you're interested.

How Happy is the World Today - Click here to find out.

Take the unhappy planet index survey

From Men's Health where there's tons of useful stuff comes this article and survey (the last page) about global happiness.

And now, here's (equivalent of) a wheelbarrow of tethers to attach a mapping of an allness to various contexts of the material world: You can compare these surveys and their results with this data from the Material World research. This data is part of Nova's WORLD in the BALANCE ongoing investigation.
Info about Material World, the print object, is available here.

By the way, I took the unhappy planet index survey, and these were my results:

Happy Planet Index
Your personal Happy Planet Index (HPI) is 61.5, which is similar to that of countries such as El Salvador, Guatemala or Saudi Arabia. This is above the world average of 46, but well below the target value of 83, so you can still do more to improve your health and well-being, or reduce your environmental impact. Your score is above that of your country, 28.8.

Below is a breakdown of the various components that make up your HPI score.

You:
61.5
Average:
43.3
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]


Life Expectancy
Hurray! Your life expectancy is well above average for your gender and country. Probably, you're doing all the major things right - eating well, not smoking, getting regular exercise, and you're lucky enough to have the right genes. Are there any more ways you could make a difference? Some factors that improve your life expectancy are more surprising than others. For example, giving up your car, avoiding living alone, moving out of the city and shrugging off stress.

You:
99
Average:
80.6
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]


Ecological Footprint
Your ecological footprint is 5.65 global hectares, or 3.14 planets. This is equivalent to the average in Brunei Darussalam.

Your ecological footprint is below average for the country you live in.

Oh dear! You are using between three and five times your share of the planet's resources, even assuming no resources are set aside for other species. That's well above the world average, and even above the average for most industrialised countries. Perhaps it's time to start taking action. Here are some of the most effective steps that everyone can make to reduce their footprint:

Leave your car in the garage. Car use has a huge impact on ecological footprint. Obviously it's more difficult for people in certain circumstances, but where possible, try to use public transport more. Or, even better, get on a bike!
It's obvious, but we have to say it. Conserve energy. Turn off the lights when you leave a room, buy energy-efficient bulbs and appliances, turn off your TV completely, rather than leave it on standby.
Reduce your waste. If there are ways to recycle where you live, try and do so. If you have a garden, start a compost heap. Re-use plastic bags. Give away clothes you don't use, rather than throwing them away. There are hundreds of little things you can do.
You don't have to become vegetarian, but cutting down on meat, particularly beef, and particularly from animals fed by imported soya feed, is an effective step to reducing your footprint.
It has to be said that air travel is one of the biggest contributors to many people's footprints. For example, flying direct from London to Sydney and back would add 5.44 g ha to your footprint - that's the average Briton's footprint for an entire year. Flights with a connection add even more polluting air miles.
You:
5.65
Average:
5.37
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]


Carbon Footprint
Your carbon footprint is 3.68 global hectares, or 2.04 planets. This is below the average for your country (5.84 gHa).

You:
3.68
Average:
3.12
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]


Life Satisfaction
Brilliant! You reported a life satisfaction of 9, which is above the national averages for all the countries of the world. At the individual level, in the World Values Survey, only a quarter of respondents worldwide, and 29% of British respondents reported a life satisfaction of 9 or higher.

You:
9
Average:
6.76
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]


Well-being
The new economics foundation (nef) recognises that there's more to life than feeling good, which is why our model for well-being is based on four domains – personal feelings, personal functionings, social feelings and social functionings. 'Feelings' refers to your attitude to the way you, your future and society are. 'Functionings' looks at whether you have the opportunities to do the things that bring you well-being. Like with life satisfaction, a score of 5 is theoretically the middle score, but, given the way most people respond to surveys, is below average.

Personal Feelings
In this online questionnaire, personal feelings are assessed with two questions – one testing your optimism and one testing your self-esteem.

You are very secure about yourself and about your future.

You:
8.06
Average:
6.05
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]

Personal Functionings
In this online questionnaire personal functionings are assessed with five questions – two evaluating your subjective opinion on your health and how activity you are, the other three testing you for feelings of autonomy, purpose and worth.

You are healthy, active and full of strong feelings of worth, autonomy and purpose.

You:
7.73
Average:
6.16
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]

Social Feelings
In this online questionnaire social feelings are assessed with four questions – three assessing your opinion of your community, whilst the last looks at personal relationships.

You have a very strong sense of trust and belonging in your community, combined with an excellent personal life.

You:
6.74
Average:
5.69
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]

Social Functionings
In this online questionnaire social functionings are assessed with four questions – two assessing your job / studies, one your free time, and one your community participation. If you did not respond to the work / study questions, your score is judged purely on the other two aspects.

You are very satisfied with your job / course - it is very interesting, rarely stressful, and leaves you plenty of time to do the things you want to do, such as participating in community activities.

You:
7.75
Average:
5.6
[Average is of all online responses to this survey - not the average for your country]

_____________________________

[I'll be using some of this data in various poams]

Posted by thyliasm at 07:39 PM | Comments (4) | TrackBack

HABA & (some of) WHAT (may) DEPEND

First some comments about mapping and maps:

As Hansel and Gretel attempted to do with breadcrumbs (if you do not know that fairy tale, click HERE for a side-by-side, paralllel mapping of two versions of the tale, the 1812 and the 1857 versions), dropping the breadcrumbs so as to be able to find their way back, so can you map to keep track of your decisions as you navigate the poem and your ideas about it.

In the 1812 and 1857 versions of the fairy tale, differences are obvious; it is easy to understand how changes are (also) linked (or tethered) to particular circumstances that are themselves linked (or tethered) to particular locations in time. The differences are obvious. But these differences in text are not all of the differences linked to the versions of the tale. The system of each version includes information of the kind also associated with a (version of) poem, for instance, whose text is unchanged over a period of time. Each respondent is linked to sets of circumstances that are linked to periods of time (that may be on different scales; not just one definitive moment. Your maps will also be documents of some of the history of the circumstances of the moments in which the circumstances and maps occur.

(It is likely that) You will be able to know (more about) where thinking went, and you will be probably be more able to offer explanations for those decisions. You can, of course, make choices that help quide thinking intoi particular shapes, particular structures.

At some point during the mapping, structure of the idea emerges. (Some of) the shape of the idea will be revealed. As the idea unfolds, a shape of the unfolding also emerges. Some aspects of the shape may become more important to your sense of the map unfolding than other aspects. You may choose to focus further on a particular aspect of the emerging shape of the thinking. A theme may become more refined, more complex with even more facets.

Similarly, the poem itself maps idea(s). Important landmarks (or charged images, phrases, etc.) may be marked to emphasize them, a rhyme scheme as a system of both visual and sonic tethers, indentation, italics, parentheses, or other departures from the dominant typography and punctuation of the poem; the attention that is drawn to the line endings —ways to emphasize features on the map.

For the next two weeks, work on these maps. Do understand that in a blog atmosphere, you can return to your map again and again (after the two weeks). You may add to the map, subtract from the map, update the maps, submit multiple maps, alternative maps, etc. Someone might think to compile a supermap of class Red Wheelbarrow maps and Lightning is a Yellow fork maps, 2D and/or 3D composite maps (multi-faced objects such as platonic and archimedean solid. Do think of crystals also, and gem-cut —faceted— diamonds. So for thew Monday after the study break, post the mapping to date, butit won't be a definitive map as few maps can be since what is represented by the map undergoes change, is not in a final or ultimate form. The map is linked to circumstances that shaped its existrence, one of which is some moment. The map was made during some location in time, a location that is not universal, as the simultaneous experience of time does not mean the simultaneous experience of the same time. So specifying a when also requires the linking to a place that experienced that when at the indicated moment.

Do not approach this as if you making something finished, as if you are making something where the expectation is that you submit the polished version; you are submitting a progress report of your navigation of the mapping of either The Red Wheelbarrow or The Lightning is a yellow fork. There is some impermanence allowed in an evolution of thinking; changes over time and circumstance are expected. In your blogs, you may update thinking at any time, and not (necessarily) by editing a post, but by making other posts, allowing the journey documented (including the journey's complexity, its multi-faced nature) to be more accurate. Perhaps also allowing the map to be more interesting or beautiful as often the multiple branches contributing to the form and shape of a tree (such as an apple tree) also contribute to its aesthetics.


(— —I haven't been able to maintain three blogs I began in July (because of an incredibly persistent neurological attack, but I include links to them so that you may see some literal mapping that occurs within the blogs which themselves are maps:
Tine Times, Tine Times Cyber Workshop, and Tine Times 2. I'll be updating these blogs asap and will be starting a neurological winter blog soon— —)


The map can also help someone (including the maker of the map) attempt to locate something specific, inclkuding an outcome that emphasizes aesthetic qualities. Perhaps your maps can be considered beautiful according to some criteria. Perhap your maps will attempt to weight the aesthetic value against some other possible values such as intellectual (according to some criteria) value. How might such a comparison be made evident?

To get to the HABA promised in the title of this post, please click on "Continue reading" that follows this sentence.

THE HABA

The time sensitivity of context can be an important consideration in the mapping of a poem; when and the prevailing circumstances of that when can shape meaning, or the topography of ideas.

Associating the redness of the red wheelbarrow with lead-based paint, could shape (some of) the so much of the poem's first line. The glaze becomes a toxic glow particularly for children who otherwise might enjoy interaction with the wheeelbarrow that looks, glazed with rain water particularly tempting.

[**Here it would be easy to extend your discussion to other uses of red, literary reds, religious reds, and cultural associations with red, for instance, explaining how these usages are part of the so much.]


It turns out that lead-based paint that has led to the recall of hundreds of thousands of hazardous children's toys manufactured in China has also led to increased interest in higher-priced, lead-paint-free toys manufactured in Europe (as you can read in this article), particularly in Germany where this Haba push toy wagon offers an alternative to (toy) wheelbarrows known to be made in China such as this one NOT ASSOCIATED, as far as I know, with an active recall at this time.

Some might conclude that much more than a grade in Eng 240 depends on (the red paint used on) a red wheel barrow.

Posted by thyliasm at 06:17 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

We Were SPEAKING OF toy STOVES and OVENS, you know

Thanksgiving dinner using two easy-bake ovens:

Jiffy-pop and Kenner Easy-bake Oven and Bubblematic commercial from the sixties:

From the eighties comes the Betty Croker Mini-wave oven commercial (Betty Crocker herself and her various updates [ditto for Aunt Jemima] is quite the poam to study):

And from the two thousands, a recall of the oven:

______________________________

Coming Soon: the vid poam about my Arnstein Stove

Posted by thyliasm at 01:16 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

October 08, 2007

SCRATCH Your Way to a Poam

That's right; click HERE and experience what it might mean to Scratch! your way to making and sharing poams and commentary about poams (which includes poems).

This is a tool you might be able to take advantage of in your mapping (and in other aspects of considering poetry) in addition to iMove, and similar tools of making.

Remember that in using iMove '07, text is added using the title tab in movie editing. For text to appear on a black background, select "over black." For text to appear on top of still images or moving footage, make sure that "over black" IS NOT SELECTED. Then use the time adjustment sliders to make sure that the length of the title does not exceed the length of the still image or the moving footage. If the length of the title exceeds the length of the still simage or moving footage, you will not be able to place that title text on the image.

We'll go over the use of iMovie in class again.

Posted by thyliasm at 05:04 PM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

October 01, 2007

RULES, "A RETROSPECT" by EZRA POUND, & HIERARCHIES OF NAVIGATION

Click some rules of contemporary North American poetry.

Apply (some of) the rules to:
the dreamlife of letters,
to Vniverse,
and to: We Real Cool

Are there aspects in these rules that you feel tend to hold true for a variety of established, conventional, traditional, electronuc, and experiemntal forms? Please offer details of your rationale.
How would you describe the structure of "dreamlife of letters" and of "Vniverse"?
How did you establish a hierarchy of navigation for these three poems?

What is the effect of all lines except the last line ending with We?
Notice the enjambment that this line ending contributes to; sentences do not end
with the end of the poetic line; instead, the sentences are completed on the following lines,

Does this poem lend itself to rhymic interpretations?
Feel free to explore several rhythmic unteractions between this poem and a number of musical beats.
Go ahead and sample a short beat or two (thirty seconds might be enough) FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES ONLY and post them in your blogs.

Do also notice an emphasis on the single syllable word choice and on internal rhyme, rhyme occurring within the lines instead of at the ends of the line where there is the repetition of We

Please also examine First Fight then Fiddle, the fourth part of The Children of the Poor by Gwendolyn Brooks.
What relevance might this poem have for various locations (specify please) and circumstances (specify please) for various groups (specify please). How provocative do you think this poem may have seemed for the 1949 audience its publication met in the US?

*Note that question seems to presume some degree of provocation; why do you think that is?

Posted by thyliasm at 06:05 PM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

PATTERN BUILDING PROPOSAL

PROPOSAL:

To consider an *allness of a poam (product of an act of making, may be a poem)
as (at least) three-dimensional.

To consider that the components of the poam plus the whole poam form an allness of poam.

To consider that each component (of a poam) may be considered a (sub)allness.

To consider that each component of a component (of a poam) may be considered a sub/(sub)allness.

To consider the three-dimensionalaity of idea further, please click here.
Do manipulate the polyhedra; click on them, turn them, etc (and give yourself various angles of perception, various perspectives for consideration).

Just as a sonnet, villanelle, or sestina (three formal poetic forms with enduring use in contemporary US poetry have rules that serve as templates for both identifying and using the forms, so too does three-dimensional reality have common forms (or structures) from which other forms (and structures) may be built.

The basic 3D units arek nown as the PLATONIC and ARCHIMEDEAN SOLIDS.

Variations of these basic (or archetypal) componants of existence occur on all scales, of course.

Once a poam is considered to be three-dimemsional, the matter of volume emerges; what are possibilities for the form(s) volume might take in a system of a poam?

Flat or 2D forms of solids exist; the print object may be considered a 2D form of a 3D idea; repetition in the sonnet, villanelle, and sestina can easily correspond to faces of a solid (in a simple, very generalized, very regular model).

While a one-to-one correspondence of poam unit to solid face/vertex/angle/edge may work for general modeals, spceficity and details add complexity to and departures from the general model to a specific incident of poam. Those irregularities that, among other things, correspond to originality (of a poam).

Consider what haapens in depaicting and measuring a coastline; the smaller the increment of measure, the more detail; with a small enough unit of measure, an infinity of coastline (more-or-less).

Here are some nets of polyhedra.
Choose one (with or without irregularities that you can cause, if you like), and onto that net, please map either an allness (define the parameter of allness you are using, and provide a reason for considering that allness) of Emily Dickinsons' The Lightning is a yellow fork

or an allness (define the parameter of allness you are using, and provide a reason for considering that allness) of William Carlos Williams's The Red Wheelbarrow.

Please make at least two maps of the same allness, one of which should be 2D, one of which should be 3D or sound, both of which should be posted in your blog (a movie of the making, the sound of the making, still images of the making, etc.) posted in your blog.

Please Document what happens as you explore ITERATIONS OF AN ALLNESS IN A POAM

Other models onto which a poam may be mapped include a blossom (and its network of petals and/other parts of a flower system), an onion, a ladder such as this or this, etc.


A poam is capable of existence in more than 3 dimensions; nothing in the rules and protocols of Limited Fork Poetics prohibit such hyperpoams. Depicting four dimensional objects can produce strange mathematical results that also functiuon as templates of imagination (as do other templates already mentioned).

Please watch D.O.D., a video poam, for more about allness and the system of a poam. and listen to Song of Iota (an onion of a song about poam systems).

*an alluring idea of unification for which I have no example; related to gravitational singularity; perhaps that single point of density that banged in the big bang

Posted by thyliasm at 02:09 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack