April 17, 2006

Event - Applied Evolution: Domestication, Disease, Crime and Culture

Saturday, April 22
Applied Evolution: Domestication, Disease, Crime and Culture

David Mindell, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan
Saturday Morning Physics series
10:30 am, 170 Dennison Building, 500 Church. St.
(arrive early, seats fill quickly)

Understand how evolutionary biology is much more than an explanatory concept, and that it is indispensable to the world we live in. When we domesticate wild species for agriculture or companionship; when we manage our exposure to pathogens and prevent or control epidemics; when we foster the diversity of species and safeguard the functioning of ecosystems; and even when we link biological crime scene evidence to suspects: in each of these cases, evolutionary biology is applied.

Posted at 12:31 PM

Event - Distinguished Speaker: Richard Lewontin

Wednesday, April 19
Gene, organism and environment

Richard C. Lewontin, Harvard University
Distinguished Speaker Series
7 pm, Chemistry 1800, 830 N. University Ave.
Reception following in Chemistry atrium

Biologists often speak of genes as “determining” organisms and of the evolution of organisms as “adaptation” of organisms to a fixed external environment. The talk will show how these oversimplifications mask the true relationship among genes, organisms and environments.

You can view Dr. Lewontin's biography or a list of selected scientific articles on the Explore Evolution website.

Posted at 12:28 PM

Event - UROP Research Symposium

Wednesday, April 19
UROP Research Symposium

Special section on research in evolutionary science
1:30-4:30, Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave.

Posted at 12:27 PM

Event - Rethinking Natural Selection

Tuesday, April 18
Rethinking Natural Selection

Richard C. Lewontin, Harvard University
Academic seminar presented by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
12 noon-1 pm, 1640 Chemistry Building, 830 N. University Ave.

Posted at 12:26 PM

Event - Good Biology and Bad Metaphors

Monday, April 17
Good Biology and Bad Metaphors

Richard C. Lewontin, Harvard University
Co-sponsored by the Science, Technology, Medicine, and Technology Program
and the Life Sciences and Society Program
4-5:30 pm, 1636 School of Social Work Building, 1080 S. University Ave.

Posted at 12:26 PM

April 10, 2006

Event - Death and Ancestors in Madagascar

Friday, April 14
Death and Ancestors in Madagascar: a cognitive developmental approach

Rita Astuti, London School of Economics
Evolution and Culture Colloquium Series
10:30 am, 4448 East Hall

Posted at 12:16 PM

Event - All in the Family

Thursday, April 13
All in the family: the ecology, evolution, & resolution
of multiway conflicts of interest in a marine snail

Dr. Richard Grosberg, University of California, Davis
Academic seminar presented by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
4-5:30 pm, Lecture Room 2, Modern Languages Building

Families are a ubiquitous and distinctively annoying venue where conflicts of interest arise between males and females, parents and offspring, and siblings. Why do females provide post-zygotic parental care in most species, males in others, and both parents in a few? Why do siblings of some species cooperate extensively, whereas others try to kill and consume each other? Are there predictable associations between patterns of parental care and the nature of interactions among siblings? How are the complex, multiway conflicts of interest among family members resolved? The mating system, because it controls patterns of relationship among family members, is one of the keys to answering such questions. Solenosteira macrospira is a buccinid whelk whose reproductive biology embodies multiple forms of family conflict, and, consequently, offers an incisive opportunity to explore the constraints and opportunities for resolving such conflicts of interest. S. macrospira females mate multiply, and package offspring in capsules, each containing 200-300 siblings. Quite remarkably, female S. macrospira (and perhaps other closely related cantharids) oviposit almost exclusively on males (>99%), and virtually never on conspecific females or other objects. Brood carrying is risky to males, because it increases their vulnerability to predators; but, it is also essential for brood survival. As in other “neogastropods”, there is often extensive predation on sibling eggs, zygotes, and embryos within egg capsules. In this talk, I will analyze the effects of the mating system on the ecology and evolution of male parental care, and the resolution of parent-offspring and sibling conflict in this, and other, polyandrous species.

Posted at 12:14 PM

Event - Evolution Mural Opening Celebration

Tuesday, April 11
Evolution Mural Opening Celebration

Created by Students in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program 140
5-7 pm, Undergraduate Science Building

Posted at 12:13 PM

April 03, 2006

Event - Footprints: Walking Through Time

Saturday, April 8
Footprints: Walking through time

A cross-disciplinary panel facilitated by the artists of The Walking Project
Laura MacLatchy, Anthropology, University of Michigan:
Two-Footed Creatures
Joseph Amato, historian and author:
On Foot: A History of Walking
Presented by Arts@Michigan
For more information about The Walking Project:
http://www.arts.umich.edu/programs/special/walkingproject/
1:30-3pm, Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 1109 Geddes Ave.

Posted at 12:16 PM

Event - An Evolutionary Guide to the Tree of Life

Saturday, April 8
An Evolutionary Guide to the Tree of Life

David Mindell, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan
Saturday Morning Physics series
10:30 am, 170 Dennison Building, 500 Church St.
(arrive early, seats fill quickly)

Observe an illustrated overview of life's diversity together with discussion of the history of evolutionary thought, and the computational challenges involved in discovering the patterns of life's diversification over the past 3.8 billion years.

Posted at 12:15 PM

Event - Not By Genes Alone

Friday, April 7
Not By Genes Alone: how culture transformed human evolution

Peter Richerson, University of California, Davis
Evolution and Culture Colloquium Series
10:30 am, 4448 East Hall, 530 Church St.

Posted at 12:14 PM

Event - Distinguished Speakers: Peter and Rosemary Grant

Wednesday, April 5
Exploring Evolution of Darwin’s Finches

Peter and Rosemary Grant, Princeton University
Distinguished Speaker Series
7 pm, Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor (Note new location!)
Co-sponsored by the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Program and the Ann Arbor District Library

Fourteen species of Darwin's finches evolved on the Galápagos islands and Cocos island in the last two-three million years. We use the results of long-term field studies of Galápagos populations to help us understand this classical example of adaptive radiation.

You can view the Grants' biography or a list of selected scientific articles on the Explore Evolution website.

Posted at 12:11 PM

Event - Workshop: Evolution and the Nature of Science

Monday, April 3
Evolution and the Nature of Science

Workshop for Undergraduates
5:30-7:30, Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 1109 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor
Final session
Pre-registration is required. Please register in the Curriculum section of http://www.umich.edu/evolution
See previous entry for details.

Posted at 12:09 PM

March 27, 2006

Event - Darwinian Medicine

Sunday, April 2
Darwinian medicine: If natural selection is so great,
why are we so vulnerable to disease?

Randolph Nesse, Psychiatry and Psychology; University of Michigan
William R. Farrand Annual Public Lecture
Presented by the Exhibit Museum of Natural History
3 pm, Michigan League, Hussey Room, 911 N. University Ave.
Reception following

Posted at 01:11 PM

Event - Evolution of Robots

Saturday, April 1
Evolution of Robots

Peter Swanson, Fanuc Robots America
Saturday Morning Physics series
10:30 am, 170 Dennison Building, 500 Church St.
(arrive early, seats fill quickly)

Take a look at how an industrial robot works, and how it has evolved with improvements in processing power and control technology. See how robotic technologies are being used in telepresence and autonomous vehicles. Look to the future as haptics, prosthetics, and exoskeletons begin to blur the line between human and robot.

Posted at 01:10 PM

Event - Does Evolutionary Theory Explain Dogon Culture?

Friday, March 31
Does Evolutionary Theory Explain Dogon Culture?

Beverly Strassmann, Anthropology, Research
Center for Group Dynamics, University of Michigan
Evolution and Culture Colloquium Series
10:30 am, 4448 East Hall, 530 Church St.

Posted at 01:09 PM

Event - Biogeography of the Northern Hemisphere

Thursday, March 30
Biogeography of the Northern Hemisphere

Dr. Michael Donoghue, Yale University
Wagner Memorial Lecture
Presented by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
7:00-8:30 pm, 1210 Chemistry, 930 N. University Ave.

Posted at 01:08 PM

Event - Making Darwin: Biography and Character

Thursday, March 30
Making Darwin: Biography and Character

Janet Browne, University College London
Science, Technology, Medicine and Society Distinguished Lecture
4:00-5:30pm, Vandenberg Room, Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave.

Posted at 01:08 PM

Event - The Future of Food

Wednesday, March 29
The Future of Food (2004)

Evolution Film Series
Respondent: Catherine Badgley, Residential College and Museum of Paleontology
7 pm, Natural Sciences Auditorium
Kraus Natural Sciences Building, 830 North University Ave.
Discussion following

This documentary explores the disturbing facts behind the unlabeled, patented, genetically engineered foods that have quietly filled grocery store shelves for the past decade, and the market and political forces that are shaping what we eat.

Posted at 01:06 PM

March 20, 2006

Event - Mars and the Evolution of Thought

Saturday, March 25
Mars and the Evolution of Thought

Eric Rabkin, English Language and Literature, University of Michigan
Saturday Morning Physics series
10:30 am, 170 Dennison, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor
(arrive early, seats fill quickly)

Once the gods fought in our heavens; now we see the orderly progress of stars. Once the night sky harbored our enemies; now we see planets as resources for the taking. This lecture will consider how, driven in part by our changing understanding of the Red Planet, these shifts and others reflect the evolving of self-conceptions of humanity.

Posted at 12:17 PM

Event - Life Through the Ages Discovery Day

Saturday, March 25
Life Through the Ages Discovery Day

9 am – 5 pm, Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 1109 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor
Activity stations throughout the Museum engage families in an exploration of life through time.

Understand how life on Earth changes through time. Take a close up look at
the fossils of creatures from long ago, and learn how scientists clean and
study fossils to reveal the secrets of ancient animals. For visitors of all
ages.

Highlights include:

* Live Animal Demonstrations
* Fossil Dig
* DNA Extraction
* Battle of the Beaks
* Family Resemblance?
* Fossils with a Twist
* Prehistoric Movies
* And much more!

For information about the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, visit
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/exhibitmuseum/

Posted at 12:17 PM

Event - Evolution, Altruism and Ethics

Friday, March 24
Evolution, Altruism and Ethics

Stephen P. Stich, Rutgers University
Evolution and Culture Colloquium Series
10:30 am, 4448 East Hall, 530 Church St., Ann Arbor

Posted at 12:16 PM

Event - Diet, Death and Demography

Thursday, March 23
Diet, death and demography

Linda Partridge, University College London
Academic seminar co-sponsored by the Departments of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
4 pm, Modern Languages Building Lecture Room 2, 812 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor

Posted at 12:14 PM

Event - Frozen Angels

Thursday, March 23
Frozen Angels (2005)

Evolution Film Series
Respondents: Filmakers Frauke Sandig and Eric Black
Penny W. Stamps Distinguished Visitor Series and Ann Arbor Film Festival
5 pm, Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor

Posted at 12:13 PM

Event - Distinguished Speaker: Linda Partridge

Wednesday, March 22
Ageing and Medicine

Linda Partridge, University College London
Distinguished Speaker Series
7 pm, 1800 Chemistry Building, 930 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor
Reception following in Chemistry atrium

Recent work on the biology of ageing has led to the surprising discovery that mutations in single genes can extend lifespan in laboratory animals. These findings both challenge some of the earlier conclusions of work on the evolution of ageing and hold some promise for understanding human ageing.

You can view Dr. Partridge's biography or a list of selected scientific articles on the Explore Evolution website.

Posted at 12:10 PM

Event - Workshop: Evolution and the Nature of Science

Monday, March 20
Evolution and the Nature of Science

Workshop for Undergraduates
5:30-7:30, Exhibit Museum of Natural History, 1109 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor
An additional session will be offered on:
Monday, April 3
Pre-registration is required. Please register at least one week in advance, in the Curriculum section of http://www.umich.edu/evolution.
See previous entry for details.

Posted at 12:09 PM