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October 29, 2009

The “Zeal of the Convert”: Is It the Real Deal?

The “Zeal of the Convert”: Is It the Real Deal?
By: Allison Pond and Greg Smith
Source: Pew Research Center

A common perception about individuals who switch religions is that they are very fervent about their new faith. A new analysis by the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life provides quantitative support for this piece of conventional wisdom often referred to as the "zeal of the convert."

The analysis finds that people who have switched faiths (or joined a faith after being raised unaffiliated with a religion) are indeed slightly more religious than those who have remained in their childhood faith, as measured by the importance of religion in their lives, the frequency with which they attend religious services and other measures of religious commitment.

However, the analysis also finds that the differences in religious commitment between converts and nonconverts are generally very small and are more apparent among some religious groups than among others.

Full text

Posted by ljridley at 02:10 PM | Comments (0)

Empire State Exodus: The Mass Migration of New Yorkers to Other States

Empire State Exodus: The Mass Migration of New Yorkers to Other States
By: Wendell Cox and E.J. McMahon
Source: Empire Center for New York State Policy (Manhattan Institute)

From the Executive Summary:

The Empire State is being drained of an invaluable resource—people. From 2000 to 2008, in both absolute and relative terms, New York experienced the nation's largest loss of residents to other states—a net domestic migration outflow of over 1.5 million, or 8 percent of its population at the start of the decade.

Based on the latest data from the Census Bureau and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), this report examines how many New Yorkers have been leaving the state, where they have been going and how much income they have been taking with them. Focusing on the period since 2000, key findings include the following:

* The annual net loss of New Yorkers to other states has ranged from a high of nearly 250,000 people in 2005 to a low of 126,000 last year, when moves nationwide slowed down sharply along with the economy. California was the only other state to lose more than a million residents to out-migration during the 2000-2008 period.
* Most of the New York State out-migrants tracked by the IRS originated in the metropolitan New York City region. Migration rates are lower upstate, but the net population impact has been larger.
* Nearly 60 percent of the New York out-migrants moved to southern states—with Florida alone drawing nearly one-third of the total. Thirty percent moved to the neighboring states of New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut.
* Households moving out of New York State had average incomes 13 percent higher than those moving into New York during the most recent year for which such data are available. In 2006-07 alone, the migration flow out of New York drained $4.3 billion in taxpayer income from the state.

Complete Report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 09:47 AM | Comments (0)

New Working Papers from the NBER

Effects of Urban Sprawl on Obesity
By Zhenxiang Zhao, Robert Kaestner
Abstract; PDF

Long Term Effects of Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws on Adult Alcohol Use and Driving Fatalities
By Robert Kaestner, Benjamin Yarnoff
Abstract; PDF

The Changing Selectivity of American Colleges
By Caroline M. Hoxby
Abstract; PDF

Posted by ljridley at 09:42 AM | Comments (0)

October 27, 2009

Improving Effectiveness and Outcomes for the Poor in Health, Nutrition and Population

Improving Effectiveness and Outcomes for the Poor in Health, Nutrition and Population
Source: World Bank

The World Bank Group’s support for health, nutrition, and population (HNP) has been sustained since 1997—totaling $17 billion in country-level support by the World Bank and $873 million in private health and pharmaceutical investments by the International Finance Corporation (IFC) through mid-2008. This report evaluates the efficacy of the Bank Group’s direct support for HNP to developing countries since 1997 and draws lessons to help improve the effectiveness of this support.

Click here to download Project Performance Assessment Reports for these countries

Posted by ljridley at 10:32 AM | Comments (0)

U.S. Food Stamp Enrollment Rises

U.S. Food Stamp Enrollment Rises
By: Nadwa Mossaad
Source: Population Reference Bureau

Timely economic data provide the means to assess the severity of the current economic hardship on the U.S. population. Official poverty estimates released on Sept. 10, 2009, by the U.S. Census Bureau show that in 2008, the poverty rate rose to 13.2 percent, and child poverty increased from 18 percent in 2007 to 19 percent, the highest level since 1997. Another measure of economic hardship, the monthly unemployment rate, rose to 9.7 percent in August 2009, a 26-year high.

Poverty and unemployment rates help to track the long-term economic health of families and individuals, but both are indirect measures of economic hardship. A more direct measure of family economic need is the number of individuals and families participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the federal Food Stamp Program. The amount of assistance depends on household size, income, and expenses. SNAP participation rates have increased dramatically in recent months and could increase even further as income levels drop and more families become eligible.

Full text

Posted by ljridley at 10:22 AM | Comments (0)

Alternative Income and Poverty Estimates: 2008

Alternative Income and Poverty Estimates: 2008
Source: U.S. Census

Press Release:
The Census Bureau will release alternative income and poverty estimates covering calendar year 2008. The data were collected from the 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC). The first set of alternative measures include poverty estimates only and are based on recommendations from a 1995 National Academy of Sciences panel on measuring poverty. These estimates use a broadened definition of income and a set of poverty thresholds that are conceptually consistent with this income measure. The second set of alternative measures includes both income and poverty estimates and shows the impact of cash and noncash benefits and taxes on the distribution of income and prevalence of poverty. The poverty estimates in this series are based on the official poverty thresholds. Both of these alternative measures are similar to estimates released in January 2009 covering calendar year 2007 from the 2008 CPS ASEC.

Income; Poverty
A Congressional Research Service Report based on the poverty numbers may be found here (PDF).

Posted by ljridley at 09:57 AM | Comments (0)

October 19, 2009

New Discussion Papers from the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Thieves, Thugs, and Neighborhood Poverty
David Bjerk
Abstract; PDF

Estimating the Impact of Immigration on Wages in Ireland
Alan Barrett, Adele Bergin, Elish Kelly
Abstract; PDF

HIV and Fertility in Africa: First Evidence from Population Based Surveys
Chinhui Juhn, Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, Belgi Turan
Abstract; PDF

The Life Satisfaction Approach to Environmental Valuation
Bruno S. Frey, Simon Luechinger, Alois Stutzer
Abstract; PDF

The Gender Gap in Early Career in Mongolia
Francesco Pastore
Abstract; PDF

Health Investment over the Life-Cycle
Timothy Halliday, Hui He, Hao Zhang
Abstract; PDF

Is Posner Right? An Empirical Test of the Posner Argument for Transferring Health Spending from Old Women to Old Men
Christoph Wunder, Johannes Schwarze
Abstract; PDF

Posted by ljridley at 03:23 PM | Comments (0)

Updated Demographic Profiles of U.S. Hispanics by Country of Origin


Source: Pew Hispanic Center

The Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center, today released five additional demographic profiles of Hispanic populations in the United States by country of origin: Guatemalan, Colombian, Honduran, Ecuadorian and Peruvian.These five follow the release earlier this year of demographic profiles for the five largest Hispanic populations: Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, and Dominican.1

More than six-in-ten Hispanics in the U.S. self-identify as being of Mexican origin. Nine of the other 10 largest Hispanic origin groups -- Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, Dominican, Guatemalan, Colombian, Honduran, Ecuadorian and Peruvian -- account for about a third of the U.S. Hispanic population. There are differences across these 10 population groups in the share of each that is foreign born, citizen (by birth or naturalization), and proficient in English. They are also of varying age, tend to live in different areas within the U.S, and have varying levels of education, homeownership rates, and poverty rates.

These profiles of the 10 largest Hispanic populations in the U.S. describe the employment and income characteristics of each group. Characteristics of each group are also contrasted with the characteristics of all Hispanics and with the U.S. population overall. The profiles are based on the Center's tabulations of the Census Bureau's 2007 American Community Survey (ACS).

All 10 demographic profiles are available at the Pew Hispanic Center's website.

Posted by ljridley at 01:35 PM | Comments (0)

The States of Marriage and Divorce

The States of Marriage and Divorce
By: D’Vera Cohn
Source: Pew Research Center

In Arkansas and Oklahoma, men and women marry young -- half of first-time brides in these states were age 24 or younger on their wedding day. These states also have above-average shares of women who divorced in 2007-2008.
It's the opposite state of affairs in Massachusetts and New York. Their residents marry late -- half of ever-married New York men were older than age 30 when they first wed. These states also have below-average shares of men and women who divorced in 2007-2008.
Full report Interactive Maps

Posted by ljridley at 01:29 PM | Comments (0)

October 16, 2009

Abortion and Unintended Pregnancy Decline Worldwide as Contraceptive Use Increases

Abortion Worldwide: A Decade of Uneven Progress
By: Susheela Singh, Deirdre Wulf, Rubina Hussain, Akinrinola Bankole, and Gilda Sedgh
Source: Guttmacher Institute

From the news release:

Increases in global contraceptive use have contributed to a decrease in the number of unintended pregnancies and, in turn, a decline in the number of abortions, which fell from an estimated 45.5 million procedures in 1995 to 41.6 million in 2003. While both the developed and the developing world experienced these positive trends, developed regions saw the greatest progress. Within the developing world, improvement varied widely, with Africa lagging behind other regions, according to “Abortion Worldwide: A Decade of Uneven Progress,” a major new Guttmacher Institute report released today.

Full news release
Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:50 AM | Comments (0)

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap
By: Mark Hugo Lopez
Source: Pew Hispanic Center

Nearly nine-in-ten (89%) Latino young adults say that a college education is important for success in life, yet only about half that number (48%) say that they themselves plan to get a college degree, according to a new national survey of Latinos by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center.

Full Report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:44 AM | Comments (0)

Emigration, Immigration, and Diaspora Relations in India

Emigration, Immigration, and Diaspora Relations in India
By: Daniel Naujoks
Source: Migration Policy Institute

India has one of the world's most diverse and complex migration histories. Since the 19th century, ethnic Indians have established communities on every continent as well as on islands in the Caribbean and the Pacific and Indian oceans.

The composition of flows has evolved over time from mainly indentured labor in far-flung colonies to postwar labor for British industry to high-skilled professionals in North America and low-skilled workers in the Middle East. In addition, ethnic Indians in countries like Kenya and Suriname have migrated to other countries, a movement called secondary migration.

This profile provides a broad overview of Indian migration flows and major populations worldwide, both in the past and more recently, as well as their remittances and contributions to India.

Full text

Posted by ljridley at 10:38 AM | Comments (0)

Measuring Immigrant Assimilation in the United States

Measuring Immigrant Assimilation in the United States
By: Jacob L. Vidgor
Source: Manhattan Institute for Policy Research

From the Executive Summary:

The year 2007 marked an economic turning point in the United States. According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, the nation’s economic output peaked late in the year and then began to contract. This development affected immigration in two important ways: immigrants began arriving in fewer numbers than they have since the 1960s; and those immigrants who not only arrived but stayed fell further behind the native-born population economically. Economic assimilation declined even among immigrants who arrived more than a decade ago, indicating that differences between that cohort and the native-born population widened.

This report, the second in an ongoing series, takes advantage of newly released U.S. Census Bureau data from 2007 to measure changes in an index describing the state of economic, civic, and cultural assimilation of immigrants to the United States. It also explores in detail two of the factors used to compute the index: immigrants’ English-language ability and naturalization rates, both of which have been affected by the reduced inflow and increased outflow of recent immigrants. Because legal adult immigrants who have been here less than five years cannot become citizens and are unlikely to have mastered English in so short a period, the economic downturn is having an effect on all three assimilation indexes: economic, of course; but also cultural assimilation, of which English skills are an important component; and civic assimilation, of which citizenship is an important component.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:32 AM | Comments (0)

Immigrants & Health Care

Immigrants and Health Care Reform: What's Really at Stake?
By: Randy Capps, Marc R. Rosenblum, and Michael Fix
Source: Migration Policy Institute

In a new report, Immigrants and Health Care Reform: What's Really at Stake?, MPI's National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy offers the first-ever estimates of the size of uninsured immigrant populations in major immigrant-destination states, the number of immigrant workers covered by employer-provided plans and the share of immigrants employed by small firms likely to be exempted from employer coverage mandates. The report, based on MPI's analysis of Census Bureau data, also examines health coverage for immigrants by legal status, age and poverty levels.

Of the estimated 12 million lawful permanent residents in the United States, 4.2 million are uninsured and more than 1 million would be excluded from Medicaid coverage or insurance subsidies if Congress does not remove the five-year waiting period for eligibility. Thirty-eight percent of legal immigrants work at small firms of 25 workers or less, which are likely to be exempted from employer mandates. Just 32 percent of legal immigrant workers at these small firms have insurance compared with 71 percent for U.S.-born workers.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:22 AM | Comments (0)

Mapping the Global Muslim Population

Mapping the Global Muslim Population: A Report on the Size and Distribution of the World's Muslim Population
By The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

A comprehensive demographic study of more than 200 countries finds that there are 1.57 billion Muslims of all ages living in the world today, representing 23% of an estimated 2009 world population of 6.8 billion.

While Muslims are found on all five inhabited continents, more than 60% of the global Muslim population is in Asia and about 20% is in the Middle East and North Africa. However, the Middle East-North Africa region has the highest percentage of Muslim-majority countries. Indeed, more than half of the 20 countries and territories in that region have populations that are approximately 95% Muslim or greater.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:16 AM | Comments (0)

October 12, 2009

Do Sex Offender Registration and Notification Laws Affect Criminal Behavior?

Do Sex Offender Registration and Notification Laws Affect Criminal Behavior?
By: J.J. Prescott (with Jonah E. Rockoff)
Population Studies Center Brown Bag Seminar, October 12, 2009

In recent decades, sex offenders have been the targets of some of the most far-reaching and novel crime legislation in the U.S. Two key innovations have been registration and notification laws which, respectively, require that convicted sex offenders provide valid contact information to law enforcement authorities, and that information on sex offenders be made public. Using detailed information on the timing and scope of changes in state law, we study how registration and notification affect the frequency of sex offenses and the incidence of offenses across victims, and we check for any change in police response to reported crimes. We find evidence that registration reduces the frequency of sex offenses by providing law enforcement with information on local sex offenders. As we predict from a simple model of criminal behavior, this decrease in crime is concentrated among “local” victims (e.g., friends, acquaintances, neighbors), while there is little evidence of a decrease in crimes against strangers. We also find evidence that community notification deters crime, but in a way unanticipated by legislators. Our results suggest that community notification deters first-time sex offenders, but may increase recidivism by registered offenders by increasing the relative attractiveness of criminal behavior. This finding is consistent with work by criminologists showing that notification may contribute to recidivism by imposing social and financial costs on registered sex offenders and, as a result, making non-criminal activity relatively less attractive. We regard this latter finding as potentially important, given that the purpose of community notification is the reduction of recidivism.

NBER Working Paper (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 01:12 PM | Comments (0)

Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia

Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia
By: Tamar Khitarishvili
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, Monetary Policy and Financial Structure Working Paper

Abstract:
This paper evaluates gender wage differentials in Georgia between 2000 and 2004. Using ordinary least squares, we find that the gender wage gap in Georgia is substantially higher than in other transition countries. Correcting for sample selection bias using the Heckman approach further increases the gender wage gap. The Blinder Oaxaca decomposition results suggest that most of the wage gap remains unexplained. The explained portion of the gap is almost entirely attributed to industrial variables. We find that the gender wage gap in Georgia diminished between 2000 and 2004.

Full text (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:32 AM | Comments (0)

The Unequal Burden of Poverty on Time Use

The Unequal Burden of Poverty on Time Use
By: Burca Kizilirmak and Emel Memis
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, Gender Equality and the Economy Working Paper

Abstract:
This study uses the first time-use survey carried out in South Africa (2000) to examine women’s and men’s time use, with a focus on the impacts of income poverty. We empirically explore the determinants of time spent on different paid and unpaid work activities, including a variety of household and individual characteristics, using bivariate and multivariate Tobit estimations. Our results show asymmetric impacts of income poverty on women’s and men’s time use. Time-use patterns of South African women and men reveal the unequal burden of income poverty among household members. While being poor increases the amount of time women spend on unpaid work, we do not see any significant impact on men’s unpaid work time. For example, women in poor households spend more time than men collecting water and fuel, as well as maintaining their homes.

Full text (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:28 AM | Comments (0)

The Hispanic Origin Population in the United States: 2007 and 2008

The Hispanic Origin Population in the United States: 2007 and 2008
Source: U.S. Census

National-level tabulations from the Current Population Survey on this population group are shown by a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. They include information on the generational distribution of the Hispanic population, as well as of specific groups, such as Mexican, Puerto Rican and Cuban. There are also tabulations on educational attainment, nativity and citizenship status, year of entry of the foreign-born, household type, labor force and employment status, occupation, earnings and poverty, housing tenure, mobility and health insurance status.

Detailed Tables: 2007 and 2008

Posted by ljridley at 10:10 AM | Comments (0)

The Harried Life of the Working Mother

The Harried Life of the Working Mother
By: Kim Parker, Pew Research Center

Women now make up almost half of the U.S. labor force, up from 38% in 1970. This nearly forty-year trend has been fueled by a broad public consensus about the changing role of women in society. A solid majority of Americans (75%) reject the idea that women should return to their traditional roles in society, and most believe that both husband and wife should contribute to the family income.

Full text (HTML)

Posted by ljridley at 10:07 AM | Comments (0)

New Discussion Papers from the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Is the Wage Curve Formal or Informal? Evidence for Columbia
Raul Ramos, Juan C. Duque, Jordi Surinach
Abstract; PDF

Fiscal Competition for Imperfectly-Mobile Labor and Capital: A Comparative Dynamic Analysis
David Wildasin
Abstract; PDF

Neighborhood Diversity and the Appreciation of Native- and Immigrant-Owned Homes
Deborah A Cobb-Clark, Mathias Sinning
Abstract; PDF

Better Protected, Better Paid: Evidence on How Employment Protection Affects Wages
(forthcoming in: Labour Economics, 2009)
Karen van der Wiel
Abstract; PDF

Kindergarten Enrollment and the Intergenerational Transmission of Education
Philipp C. Bauer, Regina T. Riphahn
Abstract; PDF

Endogenous Indoctrination: Occupational Choice, the Evolution of Beliefs, and the Political Economy of Reform
Gilles Saint-Paul
Abstract; PDF

Discrimination in a Low-Wage Labor Market: A Field Experiment
(forthcoming in: American Sociological Review, 2009, 74 (5))
Devah Pager, Bruce Western, Bart Bonikowski
Abstract; PDF

Posted by ljridley at 09:57 AM | Comments (0)

New Working Papers from the NBER

Recent Trends in the Earnings of New Immigrants to the United States
By George J. Borjas, Rachel M. Friedberg
Abstract; PDF

Top Incomes in the Long Run of History
By Anthony B. Atkinson, Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez
Abstract; PDF

The Area and Population of Cities: New Insights from a Different Perspective on Cities
By Hernán D. Rozenfeld, Diego Rybski, Xavier Gabaix, Hernán A. Makse
Abstract; PDF

Moral Hazard Matters: Measuring Relative Rates of Underinsurance Using Threshold Measures
By Jean Marie Abraham, Thomas DeLeire, Anne Beeson Royalty
Abstract; PDF

Accidental Death and the Rule of Joint and Several Liability
By Daniel Carvell, Janet Currie, W. Bentley MacLeod
Abstract; PDF

Traffic Congestion and Infant Health: Evidence from E-ZPass
By Janet Currie, Reed Walker
Abstract; PDF

Posted by ljridley at 09:29 AM | Comments (0)

October 07, 2009

Women in the Labor Force: A Databook (2009)

Women in the Labor Force: A Databook
Source: U.S. Department of Labor

This report presents historical and current labor force and earnings data for women and men from the Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS is a national monthly survey of approximately 60,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Unless otherwise noted, data are annual averages from the CPS. Users should note that the comparisons of earnings in this report are on a broad level and do not control for many factors that can be significant in explaining earnings differences.

Introduction and highlights (PDF)
Full Report (PDF)
Technical Note (PDF)
Statistical tables

Posted by ljridley at 03:38 PM | Comments (0)

America’s Families and Living Arrangements: 2007

America’s Families and Living Arrangements: 2007
By: Rose M. Kreider and Diana B. Elliott
Source: U.S. Census, Current Population Reports

Some highlights of the report are:
• Sixty-eight percent of households in 2007 were family households, compared with 81 percent in 1970.
• The proportion of one-person households increased by 10 percentage points between 1970 and 2007, from 17 percent to 27 percent.
• Between 1970 and 2007, the average number of people per household declined from 3.1 to 2.6.
• Most family groups with children under 18 (67 percent) were maintained by married couples.
• The vast majority of fathers who lived with their child under 18 also lived with the child’s mother (94 percent). In comparison, 74 percent of mothers living with their child under 18 also lived with the child’s father.

Full text (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 03:32 PM | Comments (0)

October 02, 2009

New Discussion Papers from the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Does the Welfare State Make Older Workers Unemployable?
Gilles Saint-Paul
Abstract; PDF

Class Size and Class Heterogeneity
Giacomo De Giorgi, Michele Pellizzari, William Gui Woolston
Abstract; PDF

Assortative Mating and Divorce: Evidence from Austrian Register Data
Wolfgang Frimmel, Martin Halla, Rudolf Winter-Ebmer
Abstract; PDF

Happiness and Health Care Coverage
David G. Blanchflower
Abstract; PDF

Evaluating Nonexperimental Estimators for Multiple Treatments: Evidence from Experimental Data
Carlos A. Flores, Oscar A. Mitnik
Abstract; PDF

Regional Economic Growth and Human Capital: The Role of Overeducation
Raul Ramos, Jordi Surinach, Manuel Artís
Abstract; PDF

Genes, Legitimacy and Hypergamy: Another Look at the Economics of Marriage
Gilles Saint-Paul
Abstract; PDF

The Dynamics of Social Assistance Benefit Receipt in Britain
Lorenzo Cappellari, Stephen P. Jenkins
Abstract; PDF

Asabiyya: Re-Interpreting Value Change in Globalized Societies
Arno Tausch, Almas Heshmati
Abstract; PDF

Posted by ljridley at 11:21 AM | Comments (0)

October 01, 2009

New Discussion Papers from the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

How Do Adolescents Spell Time Use?
Charlene M. Kalenkoski, David C. Ribar, Leslie S. Stratton
Abstract; PDF

Impact of Paternal Temporary Absence on Children Left Behind
Alison L. Booth, Yuji Tamura
Abstract; PDF

The Effect of Lone Motherhood on the Smoking Behaviour of Young Adults
(forthcoming in: Health Economics)
Marco Francesconi, Stephen P. Jenkins, Thomas Siedler
Abstract; PDF

Targeting Fertility and Female Participation Through the Income Tax
(forthcoming in: Labour Economics, 2009)
Ghazala Azmat, Libertad Gonzalez
Abstract; PDF

Employment, Wages, and the Economic Cycle: Differences between Immigrants and Natives
Christian Dustmann, Albrecht Glitz, Thorsten Vogel
Abstract; PDF

Substitution Effects in Parental Investments
Loren Brandt, Aloysius Siow, Hui Wang
Abstract; PDF

Racial Differences in Fringe Benefits and Compensation
Wallace Mok, Zahra Siddique
Abstract; PDF

The Role of Demographics in Precipitating Crises in Financial Institutions
Diane Macunovich
Abstract; PDF

The Inter-Related Dynamics of Dual Job Holding, Human Capital and Occupational Choice
Georgios A. Panos, Konstantinos Pouliakas, Alexandros Zangelidis
Abstract; PDF

Do Foreigners Replace Native Immigrants? Evidence from a Panel Cointegration Analysis
Herbert Brücker, Stefano Fachin, Alessandra Venturini
Abstract; PDF

Posted by ljridley at 10:35 AM | Comments (0)

New Working Papers from the NBER

The Short-Term Mortality Consequences of Income Receipt
William N. Evans, Timothy J. Moore
Abstract; PDF

The Effect of Maternal Depression and Substance Abuse on Child Human Capital Development
Richard G. Frank, Ellen Meara
Abstract; PDF

Induced Innovation and Social Inequality: Evidence from Infant Medical Care
David M. Cutler, Ellen Meara, Seth Richards
Abstract; PDF

Recent Trends in Top Income Shares in the USA: Reconciling Estimates from March CPS and IRS Tax Return Data
Richard V. Burkhauser, Shuaizhang Feng, Stephen P. Jenkins, Jeff Larrimore
Abstract; PDF

How large are returns to schooling? Hint: Money isn't everything
Philip Oreopoulos, Kjell G. Salvanes
Abstract; PDF

Poverty Alleviation and Child Labor
Eric V. Edmonds, Norbert Schady
Abstract; PDF

Spatial Development
Klaus Desmet, Esteban Rossi-Hansberg
Abstract; PDF

Misperceptions About the Magnitude and Timing of Changes in American Income Inequality
Robert J. Gordon
Abstract; PDF

Women's Rights and Development
Raquel Fernández
Abstract; PDF

Inheritances, Health and Death
Beomsoo Kim, Christopher J. Ruhm
Abstract; PDF

Measuring How Risk Tradeoffs Adjust With Income
Mary F. Evans, V. Kerry Smith
Abstract; PDF

The Effects of School Desegregation on Crime
David A. Weiner, Byron F. Lutz, Jens Ludwig
Abstract; PDF

Into College, Out of Poverty? Policies to Increase the Postsecondary Attainment of the Poor
David Deming, Susan Dynarski
Abstract; PDF

Posted by ljridley at 09:50 AM | Comments (0)