April 09, 2010

U.S. Economic and Social Trends Since 2000

U.S. Economic and Social Trends Since 2000
By: Linda A. Jacobsen and Mark Mather
Source: Population Reference Bureau

From the press release:

Since the beginning of the current recession, homeownership and mobility rates have dropped; poverty has increased; and commuting patterns have shifted toward greener, more cost-effective options, according to a new report by the Population Reference Bureau (PRB).

PRB's Population Bulletin, "U.S. Economic and Social Trends Since 2000," by Linda A. Jacobsen and Mark Mather, is a wide-ranging analysis of how the U.S. population has changed since 2000. With the 2010 Census just around the corner, it is an appropriate time to compare the United States today with its demographic makeup at the last census in 2000.

Full text (PDF)
PRB Discuss Online: Linda Jacobsen and Mark Mather

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April 06, 2010

America's Tomorrow: A Profile of Latino Youth

America's Tomorrow: A Profile of Latino Youth
By: Marguerite Moeller
Source: National Council of La Raza

This statistical brief examines the status of Latino youth in the United States. Latino youth, who compose nearly 20% of all youth in the country, experience high levels of poverty, high dropout rates, low graduation rates, high unemployment rates, and low rates of health insurance. Given that Latinos will compose about 30% of the U.S. population by 2050, the ability of Latino youth to overcome these pressing challenges today will directly impact the economic and social success of our nation in the future.

Posted by ljridley at 02:03 PM | Comments (0)

October 16, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap
By: Mark Hugo Lopez
Source: Pew Hispanic Center

Nearly nine-in-ten (89%) Latino young adults say that a college education is important for success in life, yet only about half that number (48%) say that they themselves plan to get a college degree, according to a new national survey of Latinos by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center.

Full Report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:44 AM | Comments (0)

Immigrants & Health Care

Immigrants and Health Care Reform: What's Really at Stake?
By: Randy Capps, Marc R. Rosenblum, and Michael Fix
Source: Migration Policy Institute

In a new report, Immigrants and Health Care Reform: What's Really at Stake?, MPI's National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy offers the first-ever estimates of the size of uninsured immigrant populations in major immigrant-destination states, the number of immigrant workers covered by employer-provided plans and the share of immigrants employed by small firms likely to be exempted from employer coverage mandates. The report, based on MPI's analysis of Census Bureau data, also examines health coverage for immigrants by legal status, age and poverty levels.

Of the estimated 12 million lawful permanent residents in the United States, 4.2 million are uninsured and more than 1 million would be excluded from Medicaid coverage or insurance subsidies if Congress does not remove the five-year waiting period for eligibility. Thirty-eight percent of legal immigrants work at small firms of 25 workers or less, which are likely to be exempted from employer mandates. Just 32 percent of legal immigrant workers at these small firms have insurance compared with 71 percent for U.S.-born workers.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:22 AM | Comments (0)

October 12, 2009

Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia

Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia
By: Tamar Khitarishvili
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, Monetary Policy and Financial Structure Working Paper

Abstract:
This paper evaluates gender wage differentials in Georgia between 2000 and 2004. Using ordinary least squares, we find that the gender wage gap in Georgia is substantially higher than in other transition countries. Correcting for sample selection bias using the Heckman approach further increases the gender wage gap. The Blinder Oaxaca decomposition results suggest that most of the wage gap remains unexplained. The explained portion of the gap is almost entirely attributed to industrial variables. We find that the gender wage gap in Georgia diminished between 2000 and 2004.

Full text (PDF)

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The Unequal Burden of Poverty on Time Use

The Unequal Burden of Poverty on Time Use
By: Burca Kizilirmak and Emel Memis
Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, Gender Equality and the Economy Working Paper

Abstract:
This study uses the first time-use survey carried out in South Africa (2000) to examine women’s and men’s time use, with a focus on the impacts of income poverty. We empirically explore the determinants of time spent on different paid and unpaid work activities, including a variety of household and individual characteristics, using bivariate and multivariate Tobit estimations. Our results show asymmetric impacts of income poverty on women’s and men’s time use. Time-use patterns of South African women and men reveal the unequal burden of income poverty among household members. While being poor increases the amount of time women spend on unpaid work, we do not see any significant impact on men’s unpaid work time. For example, women in poor households spend more time than men collecting water and fuel, as well as maintaining their homes.

Full text (PDF)

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September 23, 2009

Nation′s Teen Vaccination Coverage Increasing, Variability Observed By Area, Race/Ethnicity, and Poverty Status

Nation′s Teen Vaccination Coverage Increasing, Variability Observed By Area, Race/Ethnicity, and Poverty Status
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

From Press Release:

Vaccine coverage rates for the nation’s preteens and teens are increasing, but nationally, rates remain low for the vaccines specifically recommended for preteens, according to 2008 estimates released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Vaccination coverage for teens is moving up, but much work remains,” said Melinda Wharton, M.D., Deputy Director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “We have the most room for improvement for the vaccines that are recommended at 11 or 12 years of age, and for making sure that teens who are not immune to chickenpox receive the vaccine as recommended.”

The National Immunization Survey (NIS) estimates the proportion of teens aged 13 through 17 years who have received six recommended vaccines by the time they are surveyed. Three of these are recommended to be given at age 11 or 12 years: the tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), the meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4), and, for girls, the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4). If missed at this age, the vaccines can be given in the teen years. The survey also covers three other vaccines, which are recommended to be given earlier in life: measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR), hepatitis B vaccine (HepB), and varicella (chickenpox) vaccine. Preteens and teens should get all recommended doses of these vaccines if they missed them when they were younger. All doses are counted, no matter when they were received.

2008 National Immunization Survey Data Released

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August 04, 2009

Achievement Gaps

Achievement Gaps: How Black and White Students in Public Schools Perform in Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)
By: Alan Vanneman, Linda Hamilton, Janet Baldwin Anderson, Taslima Rahman
Source: National Center for Education Statistics

In 2007, mathematics scores for both Black and White public school students in grades 4 and 8 nationwide, as measured by the main NAEP assessments of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), were higher than in any previous assessment, going back to 1990. This was also true for Black and White fourth-graders on the NAEP 2007 Reading Assessment. For grade 8, reading scores for both Black and White students were higher in 2007 than in the first reading assessment year, 1992, as well as the most recent previous assessment year, 2005.

Executive Summary
Full report (PDF)

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Unequal unemployment—Racial disparities in unemployment vary widely by state

Unequal unemployment—Racial disparities in unemployment vary widely by state
By: Algernon Austin
Source: Economic Policy Institute

The labor market crisis is breaking national records each month, with no end in sight. The heaviest burden is falling on blacks and Hispanics, who are contending with much higher unemployment rates than whites nationally—about one-and-a-half times as high for Hispanics and twice as high for blacks. According to an updated analysis through the second quarter of 2009 and new projections through 2010, the trend has worsened and is likely to continue to do so.

Full text (PDF)

This supplement, State Unemployment Trends by Race, Ethnicity and Gender, includes a national overview and takes a closer look at three hard-hit states: New York, Alabama, and Illinois and takes a closer look at three hard-hit states: New York, Alabama, and Illinois

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