April 09, 2010

U.S. Economic and Social Trends Since 2000

U.S. Economic and Social Trends Since 2000
By: Linda A. Jacobsen and Mark Mather
Source: Population Reference Bureau

From the press release:

Since the beginning of the current recession, homeownership and mobility rates have dropped; poverty has increased; and commuting patterns have shifted toward greener, more cost-effective options, according to a new report by the Population Reference Bureau (PRB).

PRB's Population Bulletin, "U.S. Economic and Social Trends Since 2000," by Linda A. Jacobsen and Mark Mather, is a wide-ranging analysis of how the U.S. population has changed since 2000. With the 2010 Census just around the corner, it is an appropriate time to compare the United States today with its demographic makeup at the last census in 2000.

Full text (PDF)
PRB Discuss Online: Linda Jacobsen and Mark Mather

Posted by ljridley at 10:52 AM | Comments (0)

April 06, 2010

Projection of populations by level of educational attainment, age, and sex for 120 countries for 2005-2050

Projection of populations by level of educational attainment, age, and sex for 120 countries for 2005-2050
By: Samir KC, Bilal Barakat, Anne Goujon, Vegard Skirbekk, Warren Sanderson, and Wolfgang Lutz
Source: Demographic Research

Abstract:
Using demographic multi-state, cohort-component methods, we produce projections for 120 countries (covering 93% of the world population in 2005) by five-year age groups, sex, and four levels of educational attainment for the years 2005-2050. Taking into account differentials in fertility and mortality by education level, we present the first systematic global educational attainment projections according to four widely differing education scenarios. The results show the possible range of future educational attainment trends around the world, thereby contributing to long-term economic and social planning at the national and international levels, and to the assessment of the feasibility of international education goals.

Full text (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 02:14 PM | Comments (0)

February 25, 2010

Mexican Immigrants in the United States

Mexican Immigrants in the United States
By: Aaron Terrazas
Source: Migration Policy Institute

Since claiming the top spot among all immigrant groups in the 1980 census, the Mexican immigrant population in the United States has continued to outsize other immigrant groups. In 2008, there were 11.4 million Mexican immigrants in the United States, accounting for 30.1 percent of all US immigrants and 10 percent of all Mexicans. Over half of all Mexican immigrants reside in the United States illegally.

However, recent evidence suggests that immigration from Mexico has slowed in the context of the deep recession that officially began in December 2007 but started earlier in some regions of the country and sectors of the economy that are particularly important for immigrants.

Full text

Posted by ljridley at 09:39 AM | Comments (0)

January 25, 2010

Race and Hispanic Origin of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States: 2007

Race and Hispanic Origin of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States: 2007
By: Elizabeth M. Grieco
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

This report from American Community Survey data describes the race and Hispanic-origin composition of the foreign-born population in 2007 and compares it with that of the total and native-born populations. It shows the foreign-born have a pattern of race and Hispanic-origin reporting that is markedly different from the native population.

Full text (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 11:06 AM | Comments (0)

December 07, 2009

2009 Migration Issues

The Top 10 Migration Issues of 2009
Migration Policy Institute

1. The Recession’s Impact on Immigrants
2. Enforcement Tactics Shift in the Obama Era — But What About Immigration Reform?
3. Buyer’s Remorse on Immigration Continues
4. What the Recession Wasn’t
5. Recession Prompts Some Governments to Cut Immigrant Integration Funding
6. Canada Bucks the Trend and Keeps Immigration Targets Steady
7. The World Is Talking about Climate Change and Migration
8. More Countries Entering into Post 9/11-Era Information-Sharing Agreements
9. Some Relief for Immigrants in the Developing World
10. Asylum Seekers Unnerve Governments

Check out the Top 10 Migration Issues of 2008. For earlier editions, see the Special Issues section of the archives.

Posted by ljridley at 02:14 PM | Comments (0)

October 29, 2009

Empire State Exodus: The Mass Migration of New Yorkers to Other States

Empire State Exodus: The Mass Migration of New Yorkers to Other States
By: Wendell Cox and E.J. McMahon
Source: Empire Center for New York State Policy (Manhattan Institute)

From the Executive Summary:

The Empire State is being drained of an invaluable resource—people. From 2000 to 2008, in both absolute and relative terms, New York experienced the nation's largest loss of residents to other states—a net domestic migration outflow of over 1.5 million, or 8 percent of its population at the start of the decade.

Based on the latest data from the Census Bureau and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), this report examines how many New Yorkers have been leaving the state, where they have been going and how much income they have been taking with them. Focusing on the period since 2000, key findings include the following:

* The annual net loss of New Yorkers to other states has ranged from a high of nearly 250,000 people in 2005 to a low of 126,000 last year, when moves nationwide slowed down sharply along with the economy. California was the only other state to lose more than a million residents to out-migration during the 2000-2008 period.
* Most of the New York State out-migrants tracked by the IRS originated in the metropolitan New York City region. Migration rates are lower upstate, but the net population impact has been larger.
* Nearly 60 percent of the New York out-migrants moved to southern states—with Florida alone drawing nearly one-third of the total. Thirty percent moved to the neighboring states of New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut.
* Households moving out of New York State had average incomes 13 percent higher than those moving into New York during the most recent year for which such data are available. In 2006-07 alone, the migration flow out of New York drained $4.3 billion in taxpayer income from the state.

Complete Report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 09:47 AM | Comments (0)

October 19, 2009

Updated Demographic Profiles of U.S. Hispanics by Country of Origin


Source: Pew Hispanic Center

The Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center, today released five additional demographic profiles of Hispanic populations in the United States by country of origin: Guatemalan, Colombian, Honduran, Ecuadorian and Peruvian.These five follow the release earlier this year of demographic profiles for the five largest Hispanic populations: Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, and Dominican.1

More than six-in-ten Hispanics in the U.S. self-identify as being of Mexican origin. Nine of the other 10 largest Hispanic origin groups -- Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, Dominican, Guatemalan, Colombian, Honduran, Ecuadorian and Peruvian -- account for about a third of the U.S. Hispanic population. There are differences across these 10 population groups in the share of each that is foreign born, citizen (by birth or naturalization), and proficient in English. They are also of varying age, tend to live in different areas within the U.S, and have varying levels of education, homeownership rates, and poverty rates.

These profiles of the 10 largest Hispanic populations in the U.S. describe the employment and income characteristics of each group. Characteristics of each group are also contrasted with the characteristics of all Hispanics and with the U.S. population overall. The profiles are based on the Center's tabulations of the Census Bureau's 2007 American Community Survey (ACS).

All 10 demographic profiles are available at the Pew Hispanic Center's website.

Posted by ljridley at 01:35 PM | Comments (0)

October 16, 2009

Emigration, Immigration, and Diaspora Relations in India

Emigration, Immigration, and Diaspora Relations in India
By: Daniel Naujoks
Source: Migration Policy Institute

India has one of the world's most diverse and complex migration histories. Since the 19th century, ethnic Indians have established communities on every continent as well as on islands in the Caribbean and the Pacific and Indian oceans.

The composition of flows has evolved over time from mainly indentured labor in far-flung colonies to postwar labor for British industry to high-skilled professionals in North America and low-skilled workers in the Middle East. In addition, ethnic Indians in countries like Kenya and Suriname have migrated to other countries, a movement called secondary migration.

This profile provides a broad overview of Indian migration flows and major populations worldwide, both in the past and more recently, as well as their remittances and contributions to India.

Full text

Posted by ljridley at 10:38 AM | Comments (0)

Measuring Immigrant Assimilation in the United States

Measuring Immigrant Assimilation in the United States
By: Jacob L. Vidgor
Source: Manhattan Institute for Policy Research

From the Executive Summary:

The year 2007 marked an economic turning point in the United States. According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, the nation’s economic output peaked late in the year and then began to contract. This development affected immigration in two important ways: immigrants began arriving in fewer numbers than they have since the 1960s; and those immigrants who not only arrived but stayed fell further behind the native-born population economically. Economic assimilation declined even among immigrants who arrived more than a decade ago, indicating that differences between that cohort and the native-born population widened.

This report, the second in an ongoing series, takes advantage of newly released U.S. Census Bureau data from 2007 to measure changes in an index describing the state of economic, civic, and cultural assimilation of immigrants to the United States. It also explores in detail two of the factors used to compute the index: immigrants’ English-language ability and naturalization rates, both of which have been affected by the reduced inflow and increased outflow of recent immigrants. Because legal adult immigrants who have been here less than five years cannot become citizens and are unlikely to have mastered English in so short a period, the economic downturn is having an effect on all three assimilation indexes: economic, of course; but also cultural assimilation, of which English skills are an important component; and civic assimilation, of which citizenship is an important component.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:32 AM | Comments (0)

Mapping the Global Muslim Population

Mapping the Global Muslim Population: A Report on the Size and Distribution of the World's Muslim Population
By The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

A comprehensive demographic study of more than 200 countries finds that there are 1.57 billion Muslims of all ages living in the world today, representing 23% of an estimated 2009 world population of 6.8 billion.

While Muslims are found on all five inhabited continents, more than 60% of the global Muslim population is in Asia and about 20% is in the Middle East and North Africa. However, the Middle East-North Africa region has the highest percentage of Muslim-majority countries. Indeed, more than half of the 20 countries and territories in that region have populations that are approximately 95% Muslim or greater.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:16 AM | Comments (0)

October 12, 2009

The Hispanic Origin Population in the United States: 2007 and 2008

The Hispanic Origin Population in the United States: 2007 and 2008
Source: U.S. Census

National-level tabulations from the Current Population Survey on this population group are shown by a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. They include information on the generational distribution of the Hispanic population, as well as of specific groups, such as Mexican, Puerto Rican and Cuban. There are also tabulations on educational attainment, nativity and citizenship status, year of entry of the foreign-born, household type, labor force and employment status, occupation, earnings and poverty, housing tenure, mobility and health insurance status.

Detailed Tables: 2007 and 2008

Posted by ljridley at 10:10 AM | Comments (0)

August 24, 2009

2009 World Population Data Sheet

Source: Population Reference Bureau

Global population numbers are on track to reach 7 billion in 2011, just 12 years after reaching 6 billion in 1999. Virtually all of the growth is in developing countries. And the growth of the world’s youth population (ages 15 to 24) is shifting into the poorest of those countries.

The Population Reference Bureau's 2009 World Population Data Sheet and its summary report, to be released on Aug. 12, offer detailed information about country, regional, and global population patterns.

"Even with declining fertility rates in many countries, world population is still growing at a rapid rate,” said Bill Butz, PRB's president. "The increase from 6 billion to 7 billion is likely to take 12 years, as did the increase from 5 billion to 6 billion. Both events are unprecedented in world history.

Full document (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 01:45 PM | Comments (0)

August 12, 2009

Mexican Immigrants: How Many Come? How Many Leave?

Mexican Immigrants: How Many Come? How Many Leave?
By: Jeffrey Passel and D'Vera Cohn
Source: Pew Hispanic Center

The flow of immigrants from Mexico to the United States has declined sharply since mid-decade, but there is no evidence of an increase during this period in the number of Mexican-born migrants returning home from the U.S., according to a new analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center of government data from both countries.

The Mexican-born population in the U.S., which had been growing earlier in the decade, was 11.5 million in early 2009. That figure is not significantly different from the 11.6 million Mexican immigrants in 2008 or the 11.2 million in 2007.

The current recession has had a harsh impact on employment of Latino immigrants, raising the question of whether an increased number of Mexican-born residents are choosing to return home. This new Hispanic Center analysis finds no support for that hypothesis in government data from the United States or Mexico.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 11:13 AM | Comments (0)

July 21, 2009

Remittance Flows to Developing Countries to Decline By 7.3% in 2009, Predicts World Bank

Remittance Flows to Developing Countries to Decline By 7.3% in 2009, Predicts World Bank
By: Dilip Ratha, Sanket Mohapatra, and Ani Silwal
Source: World Bank

Remittance flows to developing countries are expected to be $304 billion in 2009, down from an estimated $328 billion in 2008, said the World Bank today, releasing a new migration and remittances brief to coincide with an International Diaspora and Development Conference running from July 13-14.

The predicted decline in remittances by -7.3% this year is far smaller than that for private flows to developing countries. According to the World Bank, remittances are relatively resilient because, while new migration flows have declined, the number of migrants living overseas has been relatively unaffected by the crisis.

Full text (PDF)
Data (Excel)
More information on Migration and Remittances

Posted by ljridley at 10:51 AM | Comments (0)

July 10, 2009

Selection, Wear, and Tear

Selection, Wear, and Tear: The Health of Hispanics and Hispanic Immigrants in the United States
By: Ricardo Basurto-Davila
Source: RAND Corporation, PRGS Dissertations

Among the factors that complicate the study of Hispanic health are data artifacts and cultural differences that originate from different degrees of assimilation. This dissertation provides a better understanding of the issues surrounding the health of Hispanics in general, and of Hispanic immigrants in particular. The author examines differences in health status between non-Hispanic Whites, Mexican Americans, and Mexican immigrants, and proposes an index of biological risk. He finds indirect evidence supporting the “healthy migrant” hypothesis, which states that emigrants are positively selected in their health status from the population of their countries of origin. Two hypotheses explaining the decline in immigrant health are consistent with the author's results: (1) the “life-course” hypothesis, which states that the deterioration of immigrant health status is a result of the cumulative negative effect of the adversities associated with the process of migration, and (2) the “regression to the mean” hypothesis, which maintains that immigrants self-select on health at the time of migration, but over time their health converges to the average health levels in their home countries.

Full Document (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:14 AM | Comments (0)

June 12, 2009

The Economics of Climate Change Migration

The economics of climate change mitigation: how to build the necessary global action in a cost-effective manner
By: Jean-Marc Burniaux, Jean Chateau, Rob Dellink, Romain Duval and Stéphanie Jamet
Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Economics Department

This paper examines the cost of a range of national, regional and global mitigation policies and the corresponding incentives for countries to participate in ambitious international mitigation actions. The paper illustrates the scope for available instruments to strengthen these incentives and discusses ways to overcome barriers to the development of an international carbon price, based on the quantitative assessment from two global and sectorially-disaggregated CGE models. Key step towards the emergence of a single international carbon price will most likely involve the phasing out of subsidies of fossil fuel consumption and various forms of linking between regional carbon markets, ranging from direct linking of
existing emission trading systems to more indirect forms through the use of crediting mechanisms. The paper discusses regulatory issues raised by the expansion of emission trading and crediting schemes as well as the complementary contribution of R&D policies. Finally, the paper emphasises the importance of incorporating deforestation into a global agreement as well as the key role of international transfers, not least to overcome the relatively strong economic incentives in some countries to free ride on other regions mitigation actions.

Full text (PDF)
OECD Economics Department Working Papers

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May 20, 2009

Census Bureau Releases State and County Data Depicting Nation’s Population Ahead of 2010 Census

Census Bureau Releases State and County Data Depicting Nation’s Population Ahead of 2010 Census

From the press release:

Orange, Fla., joins the growing list of ‘majority-minority’ counties

Orange County, Fla., the nation’s 35th most populous county, is one of six counties to have become majority-minority between 2007 and 2008, according to state and county population estimates by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. Majority-minority is defined as more than half the population being of a group other than single-race, non-Hispanic white.

Perhaps best known as home to Walt Disney World and Orlando, Orange County was slightly more than 50 percent minority in 2008, including 25 percent Hispanic and 22 percent black or African-American.

“These estimates paint a detailed portrait of our nation at the national, state and county levels ahead of next year’s 2010 Census,” said Census Bureau Acting Director Tom Mesenbourg.

Five other U.S. counties also became majority-minority in 2008 – Stanislaus, Calif.; Finney, Kan.; Warren, Miss.; Edwards, Texas; and Schleicher, Texas. Nearly 10 percent (309) of the nation’s 3,142 counties were majority-minority as of July 1, 2008 (of that total, 56 have become majority-minority since April 1, 2000).

Starr County, Texas, had the highest percentage minority population (98 percent), followed by two other Texas counties – Maverick (97 percent) and Webb (95 percent). The vast majority of the minority population in all three of these counties was Hispanic.

One county, Webster, Ga., was majority-minority in 2007 but not in 2008.

Four states were majority-minority in 2008: Hawaii (75 percent), New Mexico (58 percent), California (58 percent) and Texas (53 percent). The District of Columbia was 67 percent minority. No other state had more than a 43 percent minority population.

Detailed Tables

Posted by ljridley at 11:00 AM | Comments (0)

March 03, 2009

Decade of Neglect Has Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2008

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2008
By: Michael Hoefer, Nancy Rytina, and Bryan C. Baker
Source: Department of Homeland Security

Summary:
This report provides estimates of the number of unauthorized immigrants residing in the United States as of January 2008 by period of entry, region and country of origin, state of residence, age and gender. The estimates were obtained using the “residual” methodology employed for estimates of the unauthorized population in 2007 (see Hoefer, Rytina and Baker, 2008). The unauthorized resident population is the remainder or “residual” after estimates of the legally resident foreign-born population – legal permanent residents (LPRs), asylees, refugees, and nonimmigrants – are subtracted from estimates of the total foreign-born population. Data to estimate the legally resident population were obtained primarily from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) while the American Community Survey (ACS) of the U.S. Census Bureau was the source for estimates of the total foreign-born population.

Full report (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 11:09 AM | Comments (0)

February 27, 2009

Characteristics of the U.S. Foreign-Born Population

Census Bureau Data Show Characteristics of the U.S. Foreign-Born Population
Source: United States Census Bureau

From the summary:

According to a new analysis of data about the U.S. foreign-born population from the 2007 American Community Survey (ACS), a higher percentage of people born in India have a bachelors degree or higher (74 percent) than people born in any other foreign country. Egypt and Nigeria had rates above 60 percent.

Based on 2007 ACS data, these figures come from new detailed characteristic profiles on the foreign-born population — people who were not U.S. citizens at birth — available by country of birth.

Meanwhile, among the nation’s foreign-born, Somalis and Kenyans living in the United States are the most likely to be newcomers, and Somalis are among the youngest and poorest.

“These new ‘selected population profiles’ highlight the diversity among the many different foreign-born groups in the United States,” said Elizabeth Grieco, chief of the Census Bureau’s Immigration Statistics Staff. “This diversity is due in part to the way the various communities were established, whether it be through labor migration, family reunification or refugee flows.”

The new data reveal the diversity among the 38.1 million foreign-born living in the United States in 2007, not only by where they were born, but also by where they live now.

For example, about 80 percent of the nation’s population born in China are high school graduates. In the New York metropolitan area, about two-thirds of those born in China are high school graduates, while in the metro area of San Jose, Calif., the figure rises to 93 percent.

Summary
Detailed tables
Data charts (PDF)
Map: Foreign-Born in the U.S. (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:30 AM | Comments (0)

November 19, 2008

Effects of Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Poverty on Health and Racial Health Disparities

The Place We Live, the Health We Have: A Multi-Level, Life Course Perspective on the Effects of Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Poverty on Health and Racial Health Disparities
By: D. Phuong Do
Source: RAND

Although our choices and behaviors are inherently expressed at the individual level, they are often influenced and constrained by the larger social and economic context to which we are exposed. Consequently, place can play an influential role in shaping our culture, our lifestyle, our behavior, and our aspirations in life. The author investigates the relationship between metropolitan-level segregation measures and individual-level health outcomes; distinguishes between transient and persistent exposure to individual and neighborhood poverty in estimating individual and neighborhood poverty effects on health and racial health disparities; and estimates the causal impact of neighborhood disadvantage on health. Racial and economic segregation detrimentally affects the health of blacks, even after adjustment of individual socioeconomic factors, but its effects on health for whites are either neutral or beneficial. However, multiple-year measurements of individual-level and neighborhood-level socioeconomic factors lead to substantial reduction in the magnitude of the black/white health gap.

Full Document (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:50 AM | Comments (0)

Effects of Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Poverty on Health and Racial Health Disparities

The Place We Live, the Health We Have: A Multi-Level, Life Course Perspective on the Effects of Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Poverty on Health and Racial Health Disparities
By: D. Phuong Do
Source: RAND

Although our choices and behaviors are inherently expressed at the individual level, they are often influenced and constrained by the larger social and economic context to which we are exposed. Consequently, place can play an influential role in shaping our culture, our lifestyle, our behavior, and our aspirations in life. The author investigates the relationship between metropolitan-level segregation measures and individual-level health outcomes; distinguishes between transient and persistent exposure to individual and neighborhood poverty in estimating individual and neighborhood poverty effects on health and racial health disparities; and estimates the causal impact of neighborhood disadvantage on health. Racial and economic segregation detrimentally affects the health of blacks, even after adjustment of individual socioeconomic factors, but its effects on health for whites are either neutral or beneficial. However, multiple-year measurements of individual-level and neighborhood-level socioeconomic factors lead to substantial reduction in the magnitude of the black/white health gap.

Full Document (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:50 AM | Comments (0)

November 06, 2008

Migration and Human Rights

International Migration and Human Rights: Challenges and Opportunities on the Threshold of the 60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Source: Global Migration Group (GMG)

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, whose sixtieth anniversary we celebrate this year, remains the primary international articulation of the fundamental rights of all members of the human family. To mark the anniversary, the member agencies of the Global Migration Group have embarked on a timely, collaborative effort to analyze the challenges of protecting the human rights of international migrants.

This report is the product of that process. Among its main findings is the assessment that despite the many positive contributions migration makes to the development of countries of origin and destination, it is essential that migrants are seen not solely as agents of development. They are human beings with rights that States have an obligation to protect even when they exercise their sovereign right to determine who enters and remains in their territory.

Cooperation between governments in countries of origin, transit and destination, and among non-governmental organizations, civil society and migrants themselves, is vital for ensuring that international human rights instruments are implemented and that migrants are aware of their rights and obligations. Groups with special needs, including migrant children, female labour migrants in the informal sector, trafficking victims and irregular migrants, as well as refugees and asylum seekers, are particularly deserving of and entitled to effective protection.

Full Document (PDF)

Posted by ljridley at 10:23 AM | Comments (0)

August 01, 2008

America's Newest Mega Cities

Mountain Megas: America's Newest Metropolitan Places and a Federal Partnership to Help Them Prosper
Robert E. Lang, Andrea Sarzynski, Mark Muro
Source: Brookings Institute, Metropolitan Policy Program

States in the southern Intermountain West—Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah—are experiencing some of the fastest population growth and economic and demographic transition anywhere in the country.

In fact, thanks to such maturation, the southern Intermountain West is well on its way to earning itself the title of the New American Heartland as its economy, people, and politics become more central to the nation. Politically, the Intermountain West could be home to several swing states in the 2008 election and in time play the storied “kingmaking? role the Midwest does now.

Prepared as part of the Brookings Institution’s Blueprint for American Prosperity initiative, “Mountain Megas: America’s Newest Metropolitan Places and a Federal Partnership to Help Them Prosper? describes and assesses the new supersized reality of the Intermountain West and proposes a more helpful role for the federal government in empowering regional leaders’ efforts to build a uniquely Western brand of prosperity that is at once more sustainable, productive, and inclusive than past eras of boom and bust.

Executive Summary (PDF)
; Full report (PDF)

Individual Megapolitan Profiles (PDFs):

* Sun Corridor
* Front Range
* Wasatch Front
* Greater Las Vegas
* Northern New Mexico

Posted by ljridley at 10:45 AM | Comments (0)

July 25, 2008

Paul Ehrlich on Diane Rehm

Paul Ehrlich, Professor of Population Studies and Biology at Stanford University and author of "The Population Bomb," among other books, essays, and papers was a guest on the Diane Rehm Show on Thursday, July 25, 2008, promoting his book, The Dominant Animal: Human Evolution and the Environment.

Paul Ehrlich warned of a looming ecological crisis in his 1968 best-selling book, "The Population Bomb." Forty years later, he’s back with a new look at how the impact human evolution has had on the environment may threaten the survival of the species.

Listen to the show here: Real Audio or Windows Media.

About The Dominant Animal: Human Evolution and the Environment:

Product Description (from Amazon.com):

In humanity’s more than 100,000 year history, we have evolved from vulnerable creatures clawing sustenance from Earth to a sophisticated global society manipulating every inch of it. In short, we have become the dominant animal. Why, then, are we creating a world that threatens our own species? What can we do to change the current trajectory toward more climate change, increased famine, and epidemic disease?

Renowned Stanford scientists Paul R. Ehrlich and Anne H. Ehrlich believe that intelligently addressing those questions depends on a clear understanding of how we evolved and how and why we’re changing the planet in ways that darken our descendants’ future. The Dominant Animal arms readers with that knowledge, tracing the interplay between environmental change and genetic and cultural evolution since the dawn of humanity. In lucid and engaging prose, they describe how Homo sapiens adapted to their surroundings, eventually developing the vibrant cultures, vast scientific knowledge, and technological wizardry we know today.

But the Ehrlichs also explore the flip side of this triumphant story of innovation and conquest. As we clear forests to raise crops and build cities, lace the continents with highways, and create chemicals never before seen in nature, we may be undermining our own supremacy. The threats of environmental damage are clear from the daily headlines, but the outcome is far from destined. Humanity can again adapt—if we learn from our evolutionary past.

Those lessons are crystallized in The Dominant Animal. Tackling the fundamental challenge of the human predicament, Paul and Anne Ehrlich offer a vivid and unique exploration of our origins, our evolution, and our future.

Posted by ljridley at 10:09 AM | Comments (0)

July 21, 2008

Accelerated Human Population Growth at Protected Area Edges

Contrary to expectations, human populations living near protected areas in 45 countries in Africa and Latin America are increasing nearly twice as fast as other rural ones.

According to an article in Science, "higher population growth on PA edges is evident across ecoregions, countries, and continents and is correlated positively with international donor investment in national conservation programs and an index of park-related funding. These findings provide insight on the value of PAs for local people, but also highlight a looming threat to PA effectiveness and biodiversity conservation."

Posted by yanfu at 03:41 PM | Comments (0)

July 01, 2008

Demographic Heterogeneity

Constant global population with demographic heterogeneity
Source: Demographic Research
by: Joel Cohen

To understand better a possible future constant global population that is demographically heterogeneous, this paper analyzes several models. Classical theory of stationary populations generally fails to apply. However, if constant global population size P(global) is the sum of all country population sizes, and if constant global annual number of births B(global) is the sum of the annual number of births of all countries, and if constant global life expectancy at birth e(global) is the population-weighted mean of the life expectancy at birth of all countries, then B(global) x e(global) always exceeds P(global) unless all countries have the same life expectancy at birth.

PDF

Posted by ljridley at 11:26 AM | Comments (0)

May 23, 2008

Immigrant Assimilation

Measuring Immigrant Assimilation in the United States
by Jacob L. Vigdor

Executive Summary

This report introduces a quantitative index that measures the degree of similarity between native- and foreign-born adults in the United States. It is the ability to distinguish the latter group from the former that we mean when we use the term “assimilation.? The Index of Immigrant Assimilation relies on Census Bureau data available in some form since 1900 and as current as the year before last. The index reveals great diversity in the experiences of individual immigrant groups, which differ from each other almost as much as they differ from the native-born. They vary significantly in the extent to which their earnings have increased, their rate of learning the English language, and progress toward citizenship. Mexican immigrants, the largest group and the focus of most current immigration policy debates, have assimilated slowly, but their experience is not representative of the entire immigrant population.

Collective assimilation rates are lower than they were a century ago, although no lower than they have been in recent decades. And this is true despite the fact that recent immigrants have arrived less assimilated than their predecessors and in very large numbers. In addition to country of origin, the Index categorizes groups on the basis of date of arrival, age, and place of residence. Some groups have done far better or worse than the Index as a whole; Assimilation also varies considerably across metropolitan areas.

PDF

Posted by ljridley at 09:58 AM | Comments (0)

April 08, 2008

Migration to Hot Housing Markets Cools Off

Source: Brookings Institution
By: William H. Frey


Migration to America’s fastest-growing areas has tapered off in the last year, newly released Census data show. The slowdown is sharpest in places where growth was fueled in large part by the decade’s hot housing market—Florida, the Mountain West and ex-urban counties.

At the same time, the formerly foot-loose residents of coastal California, Northeast and Midwest cities and inner suburbs are mostly staying put. This “migration correction? is a response to the housing market correction that has kept would-be buyers from locating to previously hot areas, and in many cases, keeping them from selling existing homes in the established locales.

Full text
Charts and Tables:
Annual Growth Chart
Table A
Table B
Table C

Posted by ljridley at 03:00 PM | Comments (0)

April 01, 2008

New release of USA Counties

USA Counties now has downloadable data files to accompany the web-based version of USA counties:

Web-based version
http://censtats.census.gov/usa/usa.shtml

Excel download version
http://www.census.gov/support/USACdata.html

Posted by lisan at 08:43 AM | Comments (0)

Census Bureau releases data on metro areas

Texas is home to 4 of the nation's top 10 growing cities.

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/011671.html

Posted by lisan at 08:39 AM | Comments (0)

March 26, 2008

Re-housing the poor in their original neighborhoods

Washington's Grand Experiment to Rehouse the Poor
Erik Eckholm
March 21, 2008
New York Times
Citing a “moral goal,? the District of Columbia is preserving low-income housing by replacing dangerous projects with new communities that mix the poor with higher income residents.

For more information on the HOPE VI, program, see:

Popkin, Susan, Bruce Katz, Mary Cunningham, Karen Brown, Jeremy Gustafson, and Margery Turner. 2004. "A Decade of HOPE VI : Research Findings and Policy Challenges." Urban Institute: Washington, D.C.

Posted by lisan at 01:30 PM | Comments (0)

Neighborhod Safety and Exercise

Neighborhood Influences Exercise Levels
March 25, 2008
Washington Post

Article based on this study:

Wen, Ming, Christopher Browning and Kathleen Cagney. 2007. "Neighbourhood Deprivation, Social Capital and Regular Exercise During Adulthood: A Multilevel Study in Chicago." Urban Studies, Vol 44(13): 2651-2671

http://usj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/44/13/2651

A related article, based in Boston instead of Chicago:

Bennett, Gary, Lorna McNeill, Kathleen Wolin, Dustin Duncan, Elaine Puleo, and Karen Emmons. 2007. "Safe to Walk? Neighborhood Safety and Physical Activity among Public Housing Residents." PLoSMedicine (http://medicine.plosjournals.org).

http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.0040306

Posted by lisan at 11:29 AM | Comments (0)

March 21, 2008

Population Estimates released

New estimates from the Census Bureau are available. They show that the New Orleans area is growing; previous hot spots like Florida, Arizona, and Nevada are slowing.

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/011635.html

Posted by lisan at 11:55 AM | Comments (0)

Census Tract and Block Group criteria are released

On March 14, the Final Criteria and Program Implementation statements for census tracts and block groups, for the 2010 decennial census, were published in the Federal Register.

www.census.gov/geo/www/psap2010//psap_main.html

Most of the changes proposed in the proposed criteria (published April 7, 2007) were adopted. These include the use of housing unit counts rather than population counts as criteria for tract delineation, permitting delineation of census tracts for special land uses (e.g., airports, large parks), and a change in the approach to tracts within federally recognized American Indian reservations and off-reservation trust lands. The proposal to delineate separate tracts for large water bodies was rejected.

The principle of tract comparability over time is reiterated in the new regulation, including the strong suggestion that changes should involve either splitting tracts (when they have grown too large) or
combining them when they have become too small.

Posted by lisan at 11:36 AM | Comments (0)

March 18, 2008

From the current issue of Quarterly Journal of Economics

Tipping and the Dynamics of Segregation
David Card, Alexandre Mas, Jesse Rothstein
Quarterly Journal of Economics February 2008, Vol. 123, No. 1: 177–218.
Abstract | PDF

Posted by yanfu at 12:38 PM | Comments (0)

Managing Migration: The Global Challenge

Source: Population Bulletin

The number of international migrants is at an all-time high. There were 191 million migrants in 2005, which means that 3 percent of the world’s people left their country of birth or citizenship for a year or more. The number of international migrants in industrialized countries more than doubled between 1985 and 2005, from almost 55 million to 120 million. This new Population Bulletin, written by Philip Martin and Gottfried Zürcher, reviews the migration streams of the last several decades, globally and by world region.

Posted by yanfu at 12:11 PM | Comments (0)

March 13, 2008

Data from The Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO)

In these times of volatile housing prices, here is a good source of data on housing markets, housing price indices, and financial markets. The data are from many sources, but compiled within the website:

http://www.ofheo.gov/about.aspx

Posted by lisan at 08:22 PM | Comments (0)