« December 2007 | Main | February 2008 »

"Careers in Management Consulting" Online Discussion

Many SI students have been asking about careers and internships in Management Consulting. SI Careers is hosting a Consulting Career Exploration Panel on Friday, February 8 at 4pm. (More information forthcoming or you can check it out on iTrack and register to attend.)

In addition to attending this panel, you can also participate in an online discussion through the WORK 4 US listserv:

"Careers in Management Consulting" is the topic of an email discussion to take place Monday February 4 through Friday February 9, 2008, on the Work For Us listserv. If you are a grad student or even a faculty member in humanities, education or social science, this email discussion will give you top quality information about the field of Management Consulting, geared specifically to you and your situation.

Joining us for the discussion will be four humanities PhDs who are actively working in the management consulting field. They will share their stories on Monday February 4, then answer your questions all week till Friday February 9.

If you would like to listen in and/or participate, subscribe to Work For Us listserv before February 4. List information and subscription instructions are below. No long-term commitment is required; you may subscribe just for this discussion if you want, then unsubscribe after it's over. And of course it's free.

Hoping you will join us,
Paula Foster Chambers, Ph.D.
Work For Us list manager
****************************************************************
ABOUT WORK FOR US

"Work For Us" (aka WRK4US) was founded in 1999 by Paula Foster Chambers as a safe place for the free and supportive discussion of nonacademic and careers for people with graduate degrees in humanities, education and the social sciences. Since then, WRK4US has grown to over 1,300 subscribers from all over North America and has received national media attention (Chronicle of Higher Education, US News and World Report).

A unique feature of Work For Us is the Guest Speaker Discussions, in which humanities, education or social science PhDs who have succeeded outside the academy come onto the list for a week, share their stories, and answer questions from the group.

For more information about this list, and for a complete archive of all previous Guest Speaker Discussions, please visit the Work For Us website: http://www.jhfc.duke.edu/fhi/wrk4us/index.php

To subscribe to Work For Us, visit https://lists.duke.edu/sympa/info/wrk4us and follow the prompts.

If you have any technical difficulty, email christina.chia@duke.edu.

Posted by kkowatch on January 28, 2008 at 10:24 AM | Comments (0)

SI@Work 2007 Summer Internship Presentations Posted!

A common resource that I direct internship seekers to is the list of the past PEP Internships on the SI Career Services website. If you haven't checked this now sort-able list out, it basically tells you where most everyone that has had a PEP summer internship for the past few summers have gone, what they have done, and what they learned. Students who didn't get PEP credit for their internship also sometimes add their experiences. Fall and Winter SI 690 internships are also included in this listing.

If you are looking for an internship at UM, this is a GREAT resource as you can see what UM departments are already familiar with SI students and the PEP credit process. I always recommend contacting the SI student who did the internship to ask them about the experience and to find out who their supervisor/mentor was. If they aren't a second year student, you can always check the Student Alumni Network or the UM Online Directory to find their contact information.

What's new is that the Fall 07 SI@Work presentations (from all Summer 2007 PEP Internships) are now available for students to view through the SI Intranet. Once you login to the intranet, click on PEP Resources/SI@Work Presentations.

All students who get PEP credit for their summer internship are required to do a SI@Work presentation in the fall. In their presentation, they share information about what they did, what they learned, and how the experience reflects on their career goals and plans. The presentations are an easy and quick way to see if a particular organization or function might be right for you.

If you have questions, please let me know! - Kelly

Posted by kkowatch on January 25, 2008 at 09:29 AM | Comments (0)

Top 30 Jobs for 2008 - Article

Interesting article with some SI-related jobs mentioned! Good news for SI students. (The other jobs listed make me think that our country is slowing going crazy and in bad health, especially dental health, -- but we're looking good with nice nails and perfect skin at the same time!) I shortened the article to just the top 30 position titles, but check out the source link for the expanded version that includes 2006 employment figures, 2016 projection figures, percent growth, salary range, and required education/training.

I'll be back soon with some articles that are more SI-related. I'm up to my ears in ASB applications right now.

Coming soon -- How to Use iTrack Effectively and Top Job and Internship Resources!

30 Top Jobs of 2008 by Rachel Zupek, CareerBuilder.com writer Source

A new year means new beginnings: new resolutions, ideas and friends; new habits, relationships and goals; new salaries, titles and responsibilities. And perhaps most importantly, new jobs. Lots of ‘em. And not just for 2008, either - until 2016.

Total employment is expected to increase by 15.6 million jobs during the 2006-16 decade, according to the most recent employment projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Almost all of this growth will occur in the service-providing sector, which will account for 75 percent of all jobs in 2016.

Professional and related professions and service occupations are projected to grow most quickly, accounting for more than six of 10 new jobs created throughout 2006-2016. Twenty-eight of the 30 fastest-growing jobs are in professional and related occupations and service positions.

Interested in getting in on the new job action this year? Here are the 30 fastest-growing growing occupations for 2006-2016, according to the BLS.

1. Network systems and data communications analysts
2. Personal and home care aides
3. Home health aides
4. Computer software engineers, applications
5. Veterinary technologists and technicians
6. Personal financial advisors
7. Makeup artists, theatrical and performance
8. Medical assistant
9. Veterinarians
10. Substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors
11. Skin care specialists
12. Financial analysts
13. Social and human service assistants
14. Gaming surveillance officers and gaming investigators
15. Physical therapist assistants
16. Pharmacy technicians
17. Forensic science technicians
18. Dental hygienists
19. Mental health counselors
20. Mental health and substance abuse social workers
21. Marriage and family therapists
22. Dental assistants
23. Computer systems analysts
24. Database administrators
25. Computer software engineers, systems software

26. Gaming and sports book writers and runners
27. Environmental science and protection technicians
28. Manicurists and pedicurists
29. Physical therapists
30. Physician assistants

Rachel Zupek is a writer and blogger for CareerBuilder.com. She researches and writes about job search strategy, career management, hiring trends and workplace issues.

Posted by kkowatch on January 23, 2008 at 09:53 AM | Comments (0)

Computer Literacy Doesn't Mean Information Literacy

This article isn't really job search related, but I thought it was interesting enough to share with you. - Kelly

Computer Literacy Doesn't Mean Information Literacy, Report Says from the Chronicle of Higher Education Source

The next generation of college students, more wired than any other, might not be as good at Internet research as you may think. A new report from the Joint Information Systems Committee, a British higher-education research institute, says the "Google Generation" (those born after 1993, who can't remember a time when the Internet wasn't widely available) may be computer literate. But that doesn't make them information literate. Some of the key problems the study found include:

*Young people don't develop good search strategies to find quality information.
*They might find information on the Internet quickly, but they don't know how to evaluate the quality of what they find.
*They don't understand what the Internet really is: a vast network with many different content providers.

The report details the implications of these problems for library professionals. It says library resources should be more unified with Internet tools like Google, and adapt to the changing ways younger generations gather information. In the context of a recent report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project that says more 18- to 30-year-olds use libraries than other age groups (mostly to use computer resources), it seems there will be an even greater need in the future for librarians to teach information-gathering skills. --Hurley Goodall

Posted by kkowatch on January 17, 2008 at 12:44 PM | Comments (0)

Ross School of Business Recruiting Events - Winter 2008

For questions about Ross School Events and Company Presentations, contact the Career Center at rosscareercenter@umich.edu or call (734) 764-1373

Ernst & Young Presentation
1/15/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
E0530

PricewaterhouseCoopers
1/15/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
E0540

LinkedIn Corporate Presentation
1/16/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
E0530

ExxonMobil Corporate Presentation
1/21/2008
5:00 PM - 6:45 PM
E1530

Ernst & Young Office Hours
1/22/2008
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
ER East -- 3rd set of Tables

JPMorgan Chase & Co. Summer Analyst and Networking Event
1/22/2008
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Michigan League- Hussey Room

Bank of America Presentation
1/23/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
E1540

Deutsche Bank Private Wealth Management Presentation
1/23/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
W2740

Equity Management, Inc.
1/24/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
W2740

Touchstone Partners Presentation
1/24/2008
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
E1540

Owens-Corning Pre-Night Event
1/29/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
E0550

Research in Motion/Blackberry Corporate Presentation
1/29/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
E0530

Ernst & Young Office Hours
2/6/2008
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
ER East -- 3rd set of Tables

Tata Consulting MBA Intern Presentation
2/12/2008
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
E0540

Posted by kkowatch on January 14, 2008 at 10:38 AM | Comments (0)

Using an ePortfolio in Your Job Search

At SI, Career Services staff encourage students to develop online portfolios -- or ePortfolios -- to demonstrate their work for employers. I've heard from students in the past that for a job or internship, they were asked only a few real interview questions, but their online portfolio was viewed by the employer several times.

ePortfolios are the easiest was to demonstrate to an employer what you are capable of. Behavioral interviewing, a big trend in interviewing these days, involves questioning the interviewee in a way that will allow the employer to determine from past experiences, how the candidate will perform in future situations. The best way to show how your past experiences will indicate your future abilities is through a tangible demonstration of your work. An ePortfolio is the most portable and professional method of showing your capabilities!

Join local employers at SI for the annual MSI ePortfolio Review Panel on Wednesday, January 23, 2008 in 311 WH at noon.

See below for an article from MSN on how to best use an ePortfolio in your job search.

Stand Out With an E-portfolio By Rachel Zupek, CareerBuilder.com writer Source

Take a minute to search your name on the Internet. What comes up? Your MySpace page? An old paper you wrote in college? A court document archiving your arrest from college?

While some of these citations are worse than others, none of them are items you want to showcase – especially to potential employers. And believe me, they’re looking. Thirty-five percent of hiring managers use Google to do online background checks on job candidates, according to a recent survey by Ponemon Institute, an information and privacy think tank. Nearly one-third of those Web searches lead to job rejections.

“If an employer is going to be searching for you online, would you rather them find pictures of you at a party or valuable information about your experience, expertise and career goals?? asks Kelly Driscoll, president and co-founder of Digication, an e-portfolio service.

Enter the e-portfolio, the newest career tool in our tech-savvy era of job hunting. Not only will an e-portfolio give you a competitive edge in the job market, it also gives you a positive digital identity when companies search for you online, Driscoll says.

“E-portfolios are becoming increasingly important to supplement, support and extend a résumé into a dynamic profile of an individual with not only descriptions of work that was done,? Driscoll says, “but actual examples that give employers the ability to learn much more about an individual before even entering the interview process.?

Want to learn how to hone your digital identity as a competitive advantage in your job search? Read on for a crash course on e-portfolios.

What is an e-portfolio?
An e-Portfolio is a collection of work published online to document achievements, accomplishments, ideas, progress, performance and activities, Driscoll says. It can also showcase, publish and compile your work to expand on a personal vision or life goal; create an archive of experiences; provide documentation for grants, accreditation or donation; and more.

Why should I have an e-portfolio?
The better question is, why not? E-portfolios give workers – young and old – the tools to communicate with a large audience and be part of a greater social network that extends beyond the office, Driscoll says.

“[Job seekers] can create and customize a true online depiction of who they are and who they want to become, where they come from, where they are going and what their plans are to get there,? she says. “It is a channel for expression that creates a powerful motivation for creating great content to share with … potential employers and the world at large.?

Additionally, the process of building the portfolio allows workers the opportunity to build necessary technology skills, acknowledge their strengths, recognize areas for improvement and set goals for themselves, Driscoll adds.

Where can I create my e-portfolio?
Not such a whiz with the computer? No fear – there is an increasing amount of tools that tech novices and tech-savvy individuals alike can use to create an e-portfolio, Driscoll says.

Job seekers can mimic the style of an online journal, organizing their work by time using blogging software, Driscoll says, or people can use a wiki to create a portfolio with open organization. Blogger (www.blogger.com) and PBWiki (www.pbwiki.com) are free, with options to remove advertisements for a small fee. Other easy-to-use tools are e-porfolio (www.eportfolio.org) and Digication (www.digication.com).

How can I build my e-portfolio?
Pretty easily, it turns out. Here are Driscoll’s five tips to follow for creating your portfolio:

1. Brevity is best – Like a great résumé, you want to provide clear, direct information about yourself, your work and your achievements. Providing snippets or brief introductions to your work that lead to or link to full descriptions and examples are best.

2. Organization is everything – Make sure your e-portfolio is easy to navigate and browse with the most important information available in the fewest clicks possible. You don’t want to miss the opportunity to impress someone if your best work is buried in too much information.

3. Make it searchable – Use keywords throughout your e-portfolio so that when employers are searching for potential hires they will more readily find your e-portfolio. Linking to related Web sites, resources and professional organizations will increase the searchability of your e-portfolio. Remember to include the Web address of your e-portfolio on your résumé and in the footer of any e-mails you send related to your job search.

4. Express yourself – E-portfolios should be uniquely you, so make sure you have some level of customization in how your work is presented. Keep it simple and consistent with readable font and files that are not too big to download to view (no more than 2-5MB).

5. Keep it professional – Unlike other online profiles like Facebook and MySpace, it’s particularly important that any writing and files (like images, movies, PDFs, etc.) in your e-portfolio are free of any grammatical errors, are of the highest quality and reflect your most positive aspects you want to share with potential employers.

Posted by kkowatch on January 07, 2008 at 10:01 AM | Comments (0)

Where and Where Not to Target Your Job Search!

A great article on the best and worst cities for employment in the United States. What's not great about this article is that two major Michigan cities (Detroit and Flint) are on the worst list. Looks like it’s a good time to be a nurse or to move to Florida. Interestingly enough though, in Flint, the article reports, there are more jobs in education, training and library workers than in other fields. Read on for more information!

Best and Worst Cities for Job Growth By Mary Lorenz, CareerBuilder.com writer

The Best...

Florida isn't just for vacationers and retirees anymore. It seems the Sunshine State is also a hub for employers and businesses eager to expand and hire more workers.

Forbes.com recently released its annual list of the 200 Best Places for Businesses and Careers, and, among those places, five Florida cities ranked in the top 10 for U.S. cities with the highest job growth. Cape Coral, Fla. held the top spot for cities with the highest job growth. Las Vegas, Nev. ranked second, followed by Naples, Fla. and Sarasota, Fla. McAllen, Tex. rounded out the top five.

If you need a change of scenery and are thinking about relocating in the next few years, consider one of the following 10 cities, which are projected to have the highest job growth this year, as reported by Forbes.com and based on five-year projections from Economy.com.

Cape Coral, Florida
Population: 562,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary*:
Registered nurses -- $44,561
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $48,772
Accountants and auditors -- $41,609
Jobs more common to Cape Coral than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Helpers/roofers -- $19,634
Athletes and sports competitors -- $15,496
Construction managers -- $55,752

Las Vegas, Nevada
Population: 1,777,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Elementary school teachers -- $29,318
Registered nurses -- $51,869
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $49,474
Jobs more common to Las Vegas than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Gaming supervisors -- $22,624
Gaming change persons and booth cashiers -- $23,016
Gaming service workers -- $12,879

Naples, Florida
Population: 317,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $47,015
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $52,641
Accountants and auditors -- $41,363
Jobs more common to Naples than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Construction managers -- $67,005
Helpers -- painters, plasterers, paperhangers and stucco masons -- $19,753
Tile and marble setters -- $30,447

Sarasota, Florida
Population: 689,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $43,211
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $48,643
Accountants and auditors -- $39,408
Jobs more common to Sarasota than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Fence erectors -- $24,917
Financial managers -- $75,189
Motorboat mechanics -- $27,961

McAllen, Texas
Population: 697,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Elementary school teachers -- $36,246
Registered nurses -- $47,115
Secondary school teachers -- $39,915
Jobs more common to McAllen than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Personal and home care aids -- $16,142
Oil, gas and mining service unit operators -- $29,877
Agricultural products graders and sorters -- $12,472

Port St. Lucie, Florida
Population: 391,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $46,074
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $39,025
Accountants and auditors -- $43,736
Jobs more common to Port St. Lucie than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Helpers -- painters, paperhangers, plasterers and stucco masons -- $25,097
Helpers -- roofers -- $18,240
Roofers -- $24,463

Riverside, California
Population: 4,017,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Elementary school teachers -- $48,696
Registered nurses -- $58,573
Secondary school teachers -- $50,286
Jobs more common to Riverside than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Terazzo workers and finishers -- $32,930
Slot key persons -- $13,343
Automotive glass installers and repairers -- $42,514

Fayetteville, Arkansas
Population: 417,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $41,669
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $43,358
Elementary school teachers -- $36,306
Jobs more common to Fayetteville than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Meat, poultry and fish cutters and trimmers -- $17,975
Agricultural inspectors -- $27,180
Purchasing managers -- $54,734

Ocala, Florida
Population: 311,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $44,557
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $43,782
Loan officers -- $36,586
Jobs more common to Ocala than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Recreational vehicle service technicians -- $28,633
Farmworkers, farm and ranch hands -- $17,963
Nonfarm animal caretakers -- $17,209

Phoenix, Arizona
Population: 3,976,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Elementary school teachers -- $29,399
Registered nurses -- $50,755
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $43,028
Jobs more common to Phoenix than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Aircraft structure surfaces, rigging and systems assemblers -- $35,324
Gaming and surveillance officers and gaming investigators -- $22,074
Umpires, referees and other sports officials -- $50,326

The Worst...

Your heart may be in San Francisco, but your best chances of finding a new job in the coming years are probably elsewhere.

For its annual "Best Places for Businesses and Careers" list, Forbes.com ranked 200 United States metropolitan cities based on the accumulated factors of job growth, cost of doing business, educational attainment, living costs and crime rates. Although San Francisco ranked high among cities with the number of adult inhabitants with a college degree, it came in at a dismal No. 175 overall and an even more dismal No. 197 for places with high job growth.

Still, in terms of job growth, the home to Rice-A-Roni performed better than Hickory, N.C., San Jose, Calif. and New Orleans, La., the city with the smallest job growth on Forbes.com's list.

According to Forbes, the following metro areas are top 10 places where U.S. job growth is smallest. If you are looking for and are having trouble finding work in one of these places, it may be that the supply of job candidates outnumbers the demand for workers.

New Orleans, Lousiana
Population**: 913,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary*:
Registered nurses -- $50,496
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $37,236
Elementary school teachers -- $34,374
Jobs more common near New Orleans than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Pump operators -- $38,149
Sailors and marine oilers -- $27,807
Bridge and lock tenders -- $25,469

San Jose, California
Population: 1,774,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Computer applications software engineers -- $78,822
Computer systems software engineers -- $88,659
Registered nurses -- $79,649
Jobs more common near San Jose than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Semiconductor processors -- $34,169
Oral and maxillofacial surgeons -- $186,196
Computer hardware engineers -- $88,163

Hickory, North Carolina
Population: 358,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $45,244
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $43,338
Elementary school teachers -- $32,390
Jobs more common near Hickory than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Wood model makers -- $24,799
Wood patternmakers -- $25,750
Upholsterers -- $34,240

San Francisco, California
Population: 1,692,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $71,408
Accountants and auditors -- $51,435
Computer applications software engineers --$70,426
Jobs more common near San Francisco than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Mathematical scientists -- $69,664
Graduate teaching assistants -- $26,324
Biochemists and biophysicists -- $76,807

Detroit, Michigan
Population: 1,977,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $53,194
Elementary school teachers -- $50,238
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $54,024
Jobs more common near Detroit than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Septic tank servicers and sewer pipe cleaners --$24,689
Drilling and boring machine tool setters, operators and tenders -- $45,476
Power plant operators -- $55,733

Cambridge, Massachusetts
Population: 1,471,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $65,598
Accountants and auditor -- $47,239
Computer applications software engineers -- $69,912
Jobs more common near the Cambridge area than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Nuclear technicians -- $55,952
Oral and maxillofacial surgeons -- $193,462
Atmospheric and space scientists -- $62,651

Flint, Michigan
Population: 444,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $48,594
Elementary school teachers -- $50,475
Secondary school teachers -- $48,177
Jobs more common near Flint than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Postsecondary teachers -- $60,113
Education, training and library workers -- $51,530
Elementary and secondary education administrators -- $71,703

Binghamton, New York
Population: 248,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $41,437
Secondary school teachers -- $40,957
Elementary school teachers -- $36,611
Jobs more common near Binghamton than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Coil winders, tapers and finishers -- $16,525
Judges and magistrates -- $70,856
Legislators -- $102,050

Canton, Ohio
Population: 411,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $47,910
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $41,607
Secondary school teachers -- $45,051
Jobs more common near Canton than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Metal and plastic forging machine operators -- $45,255
Welding operators -- $27,655
Heat treating equipment operators -- $23,888

Dayton, Ohio
Population: 846,000
Most popular jobs and average local salary:
Registered nurses -- $45,867
Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives -- $48,827
Secondary school teachers -- $44,184
Jobs more common near Dayton than other U.S. cities and average local salary:
Metal and plastic workers -- $32,182
Materials engineers -- $76,952
Postsecondary engineering teachers -- $50,824

*Salary information provided by CBsalary.com. All other data from Forbes.com and CityTownInfo.com.
**Population numbers based on metro area.

Posted by kkowatch on January 02, 2008 at 03:20 PM | Comments (0)