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[Employers@SI] North Carolina State University Library - November 12, 2010

North Carolina State University Library Information Session
Noon-1 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 12
2185 North Quad

Emily Lynema (former NCSU Libraries Fellow and SI graduate) and Adam Rogers (current NCSU Libraries Fellow) will visit the School of Information Studies on November 12 to discuss the NCSU Libraries Fellows Program and other professional opportunities at NCSU Libraries.
Register to attend via iTrack!

Posted by shamille on October 28, 2010 at 11:46 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 25, 2010

In this Edition:
Employers @SI
Mock Interviews @SI
Did You Know?
Workshops/Programs
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Employers @SI
Abbott Labs: Information Session & Informational Interviews
Wednesday, October 27

Information Session
Noon-1:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room) - Lunch provided

Informational Interviews
1:15-4:30 p.m. (30 minute interviews)
3360 North Quad

Are you a full-time student interested in a Records Management Internship with Abbott Laboratories?

If so, please join us Wednesday, October 27, 2010 in the Ehrlicher Room (3100 NQ) at Noon for an informative presentation. Lunch will be provided and interviews for candidates interested in a summer internship with Abbott Corporate Records will begin at 1:15 p.m.

Abbott Corporate Records offers summer interns opportunities to work in a variety of areas, such as: Records Policy and Procedure, Information Analysis and Retrieval and eRecords Management. The facility is located near Abbott’s global headquarters just north of Chicago, with easy access to expressways, railways and airports.

Abbott is a global, broad-based health care company with products that span the continuum of care, from nutritional products and laboratory diagnostics to medical devices and pharmaceutical therapies. For more information about Abbott, visit www.abbott.com.

Mock Interviews @SI
UM Art, Architecture & Engineering Library
Science Librarian (4 Slots Available)
Friday, October 29
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 27 at 11:59 p.m.

Ithaka
User Experience Specialist (Schedule Full)
Friday, October 29
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 27 at 11:59 p.m.

Did You Know?
SI CDO has a blog that features a wide array of job search tips and resources. Check out our recent postings on How to Use LinkedIn and Tips on the Federal Internship Search. http://mblog.lib.umich.edu/

Workshops/Programs
A Day in the Life of an... Interaction Designer (sponsored by SOCHI)
Monday, October 25
7-9 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Current and past Interaction Designers will come to SI to talk about their daily responsibilities and the nuances of their field and their working environment. Please bring questions!

Careers in Electronic Publishing Webinar w/ Proquest
Thursday, October 28
3-4 p.m.
4446 North Quad

ProQuest employs more than 100 individuals with library degrees. These employees work in a variety of positions throughout the company and around the world. Join us for an hour-long webinar to learn more about some of their alternative careers in librarianship, the products these information science professionals help make possible, and the steps you can take to better position yourself to enter the job market, no matter what type of library work appeals to you! Ideal for current library or information science students.

Career Talk w/ ALA IT Policy Office (Information
Policy Careers in Washington)

Friday, October 29
Noon-1 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Speaker: Alan S. Inouye, Ph.D.
Director, Office for Information Technology Policy, American Library Association, Washington

What information policy jobs are available in Washington? Who are the employers? This session will provide an overview of the diverse array of employers of information policy professionals. What are the characteristics that make them different? What are the implications of these characteristics for jobs and employees? What are some of the trends affecting current employment prospects? These topics will be addressed in a brief presentation with plenty of time for your questions.

Lunch will be provided, so please RSVP on iTrack so that we have enough for everyone.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Emily Bowman Appointment/Walk-In Hours
Wednesday, October 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ
Thursday, October 28 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ

If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on October 25, 2010 at 09:38 AM | Comments (0)

Michigan Alumni Succeed - October 28, 2010 at Ford Field

Take advantage of the Alumni Association’s networking opportunities at any career stage, and join us for a series of career-focused events across the country. Career events provide U-M alumni with the opportunity to gain valuable insight into today’s professional world through dynamic sessions with some of the best career experts available.

In addition to the information provided by the career event speakers, these networking events give U-M alumni the opportunity to:

* Build networks that will help you advance professionally and personally
* Learn the latest workplace trends and discuss key topics
* Make valuable career connections with fellow alumni

Michigan Alumni Succeed
October 28, 2010
6 p.m. – Networking (light refreshments provided, please bring business cards)
7-9 p.m. – Michigan Alumni Succeed Presentation
Ford Field, Hall of Legends
Detroit, Michigan

University of Michigan and Michigan State University join forces to bring South East Michigan alumni the tools and resources they need to make powerful strides in their career development.

Gain skills that will allow you to:

* Take control of your career development
* Learn the new job search: Your identity online is as relevant as your resume
* Lead as you advance through your job search or career transitions
* Learn the intangibles of leadership
* How to create entrepreneurial opportunities for yourself in Michigan

Speakers include:

Catherine Lilly – Lilly, ’77, MSW’81, is the senior advisor to the U-M executive vice president and chief financial officer, and the director of the U-M Business and Finance Leadership Academy. Lilly has worked fervently on behalf of leadership issues during her years of service at the University, providing organizational development consultation to the CFO executive leadership team and many other senior leadership groups. In her role as head of the Business and Finance Leadership Academy, she prepares the next generation of the most talented business and finance administrative leaders with the strategic skills necessary to support the University of Michigan.

Dr. Bryan Ritchie – As Director of the MSU Entrepreneurship Network, Ritchie works to coordinate the capacity and resources for entrepreneurship at MSU with the communities of Lansing and greater Michigan. Ritchie is an entrepreneur and has started several computer companies. In addition, he has played a leading role in Novell, Inc.’s initiative to network the home.

Ritchie is a professor of international relations and political economy at the James Madison College, Michigan State University. His research focuses on the political economy of innovation, entrepreneurship, technological development, skills education and training, and social capital.

John Hill – Hill, director of Alumni Career Services at Michigan State University, is charged with providing career services to 420,000 MSU alumni. Hill will enhance your understanding of how employers are utilizing tools like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter to vet and source candidates they bring into their workforce.

There is no cost to attend this event, registration is required. Parking is facilities adjacent to Ford Field and Comerica Park are available on a first come, first serve basis for a fee.

Register today!

Save the Date! The Alumni Association of the University of Michigan is proud to deliver three other complimentary career development events in the state of Michigan. More information to come; please check back soon!

Event dates and locations:

February 17, 2011, in Ann Arbor, Michigan
April 20, 2011, in Grand Rapids, Michigan
June 16, 2011, in Lansing, Michigan

Posted by kkowatch on October 22, 2010 at 11:07 AM | Comments (0)

Finding a Federal Internship

Finding a Federal Internship

It’s not just making a living, it’s making the difference.
Without a doubt, federal internships are the best way to get your foot in the door for a future government job. Internships are available for high school, college and graduate students, and are a great opportunity for students to learn about working in the public sector. Thousands of students work for our government each year, and you can too.

Using USAJOBS.gov
USAJOBS.gov is the government’s official careers website; the federal equivalent to monster.com. This is where you will find virtually all government job openings, complete with job descriptions and instructions for how to apply. Navigating USAJOBS.gov and understanding how to dissect a job vacancy announcement is extremely important to your federal internship search. Follow these steps to make the process easier:

**Create an account on USAJOBS.gov. Having an account allows you to use the federal resume builder and create up to five customized federal resumes. An account also allows you to generate specific searches and have the results e-mailed to you automatically!

**Keyword search is a great tool for narrowing down your results. When looking for internships, try searching for words that coincide with federal student programs such as “student temporary employment,” “student career experience” or “internship.”

**StudentJobs webpage can be found from the homepage of USAJOBS.gov. This is a great starting point when searching for specific federal student programs. You can also take advantage of student resources, including the Federal Jobs by College Major list, on the StudentJobs page.

**Questions? You should feel free to follow up directly with the human resources contact that is listed at the bottom of the “overview” section of each vacancy announcement. You can ask this contact for more information about the position as well as the hiring timeline.

Important Note: Agencies are not required to post all of their student opportunities on USAJOBS.gov. This means that USAJOBS does not serve as a comprehensive database of all student internships. Keep reading to discover more ways to find a federal internship!

Using Agency Websites
Sometimes it pays to go straight to the source, especially if you’re focusing your search on a limited number of agencies. All agencies will have a “Jobs,” “Careers” or “Opportunities” tab on their websites. These webpages may provide special instructions or have more detailed information about fellowship, internship or co-op programs. Follow these tips to make searching on these sites easier:

**Employment Opportunities is a tab featured on almost every federal agency’s website. Clicking on the employment tab will often lead you to a page featuring student opportunities and internships. Agencies will list open student positions as well as information on how to apply.

**Search Function can be used in a similar manner to the USAJOBS.gov keyword search. If an agency website is overwhelming to you, try a keyword search (often found in the top right corner of the site). Search for phrases like “student temporary employment” and “student career experience.”

**Calling Human Resources can be a very productive tactic if you are still lacking information on student programs after you complete your website research. Most agencies are happy to speak with you; just do your homework first and be polite when you call.

Other Avenues to Federal Internships
Career Fairs are hosted by a variety of organizations, universities and specialized groups of working professionals, and can be a great way to meet agency human resources contacts. Check your local convention center calendars, scour the newspaper, look at career center websites for local colleges and universities and search “federal career days” online.

Special Interest Sites can be a helpful tool in narrowing down your search. If you are considering a specific profession, there may be sites already tailored to address your needs.

Pay and Benefits
Not all federal internships are created equal. While some internships are unpaid, others are paid and include a full benefits package!

Timeline
If you are looking for a summer internship, you should start your search between September/October and January, to give yourself ample time to complete the application process. Also, keep in mind that internships requiring a high-level security clearance—for example, DOD, State, and the Intelligence Community—will have deadlines in early November to allow time for the security clearance process.

Federal Resumes
Highlight relevant coursework. Focus on the duties section of the vacancy announcement. You should cater your resume to reflect the keywords found in this section, and clearly demonstrate why you are the best candidate for the position.

Tips and Pointers
A lot of young jobseekers don’t take time to perfect their application. Jump ahead of the competition by taking the time to have someone else proofread your application!

Federal internships are competitive and sometimes it takes time to hear back from an agency. However, if you haven’t heard back from an agency, be proactive and contact them to inquire about the status of your application.

Find and Apply for Federal Jobs and Internships Online

Student Temporary Employment Program (STEP) positions are paid internships that can range from a summer job to a position that lasts as long as you are in school. STEP is similar to a traditional internship program and will allow you to gain valuable experience in a variety of fields!

Student Career Experience Program (SCEP) offers substantive internship experience with federal agencies. The work must be related to your area of study and requires the agency to have a formal commitment with your institution. Most positions are paid, and you may also receive academic credit. If you successfully complete 640 hours of work as a SCEP, you can be appointed to a permanent position without going through the traditional hiring process.

Fun Facts

**For most federal internships, you can submit a traditional resume without having to respond to any online assessments.

**Federal student internships are considered non-competitive, meaning that agencies do not have to go through all of the steps required for hiring permanent employees.

Brought to you by the Partnership for Public Service. The Partnership for Public Service is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that works to revitalize the federal government by inspiring a new generation to serve and by transforming the way government works.

Posted by kkowatch on October 22, 2010 at 08:37 AM | Comments (0)

[Mock Interviews] Cengage Learning – User Experience Specialist - Nov. 5

The SI Career Development Office will welcome Cengage Learning to North Quad this fall for Mock Interviews. Please login to iTrack in order to sign up for a Mock Interview Slot!

Friday, November 5
Cengage Learning – User Experience Specialist

Mock Interviews are first come, first serve and should be treated with the same regard as a real professional interview.

Note: If the organizations or positions offered aren’t exactly what you are targeting, that’s okay – sign up for something close anyway! The feedback you’ll receive will be helpful for your job search no matter what.

To see the full interview schedule and to sign up for a Mock Interview, login to iTrack. You must have an approved resume on iTrack in order to sign up for a slot. Then, click on “Campus Interviews I Qualify” For to view the listings.

If you have questions, please contact the SI Career Development Office.

Posted by kkowatch on October 20, 2010 at 04:05 PM | Comments (0)

[international] International Career Panels and Fair this Week!

There are MANY international career-oriented events going on around campus this week! See below for descriptions of all – be sure to attend the SI-CDO Sponsored Global Careers in Engineering, Information, & Technology tonight on North Campus!

Global Careers in Engineering, Information, & Technology - Tuesday, October 19, 2010
International Environmental Careers Panel - Wednesday October 20
Careers in Global Health - Wednesday, October 20
Teaching and Volunteering Abroad - Wednesday, October 20
The 2010-11 INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FAIR - Thursday October 21
Peace Corps Information Meeting - Thursday October 21

Global Careers in Engineering, Information, & Technology
Tuesday, October 19, 2010 – TONIGHT!
5:30 – 7:00pm (this event starts at 5:30pm, not Michigan Time)
Chrysler Center Lobby (North Campus)

This panel discussion regarding Global Careers in Engineering, Information and Technology will feature representatives from Schlumberger, Whirlpool, P3, Deloitte, IBM, IAESTE, AIESEC and an international student from India who had an internship in Shanghai. This panel is part of the International Career Pathways events, which brings University of Michigan students together with educators and employers to explore pathways to international careers through opportunities for significant experiences abroad (work, internships, volunteering and research abroad) and international education, both on-campus and abroad.

This event is co-sponsored by the UM School of Information - Career Development Office and the UM College of Engineering – Engineering Career Resource Center.
________________________________________

International Environmental Careers Panel
Wednesday October 20
3:00-4:30 PM
1040 Dana Building

A panel of environmental professionals working to address critical global environmental issues will discuss career opportunities in this emerging field. Learn how their careers developed, what skills and experiences are critical to work in this field, get advice on pursuing similar careers, and ask questions of the panelists.

Panelists include:
UNDP, Division of the Global Environment Facility - Kevin Hill, Technical Advisor
USDA Forest Service, International Programs - Stephanie Otis, West Africa Program Specialist
Microcarbon Foundation - Tina Tam, Project Development Intern (Summer 2010, Beijing, China)

This event is sponsored by the UM School of Natural Resources and Environment
________________________________________

Careers in Global Health
Wednesday, October 20
5:00-6:30 PM
Michigan Union Anderson Room

Representatives from organizations involved in various aspects of international health and humanitarian relief will share the paths they took to reach their current positions, as well as discuss the key elements to preparing for a successful career in international health.

Panelists include:
USAID - Gary Newton, U.S. Government Special Advisor for Orphans and Vulnerable Children
John Snow, Inc. - Mike Farabaugh, HIV&AIDS / Senior Advisor
CARE USA - Bethann Witcher Cottrell, Director of Child Health and Nutrition
University of Michigan North Campus Research Center - David Canter, Executive Director, North Campus Research Center, and past Director of Health Care Research, William Davidson Institute

This event is sponsored by the UM School of Public Health.

________________________________________

Teaching and Volunteering Abroad
Wednesday, October 20
7:00-8:30 PM
Michigan Union Pond Room

Programs for teaching and volunteering abroad offer a vast range of opportunities in fields such as health, social work, natural resources and teaching English. Positions are available for undergraduate and graduate/professional students, as well as for those about to graduate. Find out about some well-established programs and follow up with their representatives (and many more) at the International Opportunities Fair the following day. Sponsored by the U-M International Center. Panelists include representatives from the following organizations:

Abroad China – internship and volunteer placements in China
CIEE Teach Abroad – teaching placements in Chile, China, Dominican Republic, S. Korea, Spain, Thailand
French Government Teaching Assistantship – year-long teaching placement throughout France
JET - teaching in Japan through the Japanese government
Peace Corps – teaching and volunteer placements in various countries
Training Express – teaching opportunities in Spain
________________________________________

The 2010-11 INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FAIR
Thursday October 21
2:00 to 6:00 PM
Michigan Union
http://www.careercenter.umich.edu/students/events/intlfair.html

Don’t miss this once-a-year event! The 8th annual International Opportunities Fair is a great way to start networking with organizations and kick-off your job and internship search! We expect nearly 70 organizations and 700+ students to participate in the event.

It’s not too soon to start your search for a summer internship or post-grad job! Some of the programs represented have deadlines in early November, including: UM-GIEU (Nov. 1); US State Department internships (Nov. 3); UM-MHIRT funded research positions (Nov. 12), JET--postgrad teaching in Japan, (Nov. 18), CDS internships in Germany, Spain & Argentina (Dec. 1).

To make the most of your time at this event, please check out the brand-new Quick Reference Guide at:
http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt/work/resources/ICP/intfair/students/ICP-IOFairChart2010.pdf

The International Center will have a table at the Fair, and we’ll be happy to help direct you to the most relevant organizations for your specific interests—feel free to e-mail us in advance with questions at icoverseas@umich.edu
________________________________________

Peace Corps Information Meeting
Thursday October 21
6:30-8:00 PM
International Center

Apply now to start in summer 2011

Inspired by last week’s events celebrating 50 years of Peace Corps at University of Michigan? Join Peace Corps for a General Information Session and learn about the Peace Corps application process, hear stories from Returned Peace Corps Volunteers. If you are a senior and thinking about Peace Corps after graduation, now is a great time to start the application process which takes about 9-12 months. Almost all Peace Corps volunteers began their application process by attending a general information session. The information session is open to everyone; from freshmen to grad students to community members. If you are unable to attend, feel free to contact our office to set up an appointment to come in and have all your questions answered.

U-M Peace Corps Office
International Center Room 10
Office Hours: Mon: 9-12, Tue: 1-5, Wed: 3-5, Thu: 1-5, Fri: 9-12, or by Appointment
734 647 2182
peace.corps@umich.edu

These programs are UM International Career Pathways events.
http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt/work/resources/ICP

Posted by kkowatch on October 19, 2010 at 10:33 AM | Comments (0)

[Mock Interviews] Ithaka - User Experience Specialist - October 29

The SI Career Development Office will welcome Ithaka to North Quad this fall for Mock Interviews. Please login to iTrack in order to sign up for a Mock Interview Slot!

Friday, October 29
Ithaka – User Experience Specialist

Mock Interviews are first come, first serve and should be treated with the same regard as a real professional interview.

Participating in mock interviews can be a key step towards internship or job search success. You will participate in a simulated interview and the employer will provide you with feedback on how to improve your interviewing skills. Don’t wait until the real thing to learn how comfortable you are with interviewing!

Note: If the organizations or positions offered aren’t exactly what you are targeting, that’s okay – sign up for something close anyway! The feedback you’ll receive will be helpful for your job search no matter what.

To sign up for a Mock Interview, login to iTrack. You must have an approved resume on iTrack in order to sign up for a slot. Then, click on “Campus Interviews I Qualify” For to view the listings.

If you have questions, please contact the SI Career Development Office.

University of Michigan School of Information
Career Development Office
(734) 647-7650
si.careers@umich.edu

Posted by kkowatch on October 18, 2010 at 03:07 PM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] LinkedIn Etiquette Guide for Students & Recent Grads

Last week, the SI-CDO did a five-part series on how to use LinkedIn most effectively. To round out the series, check out this resource on the etiquette related to this great online networking resource!

Q&A: LinkedIn Etiquette Guide for Students & Recent Grads

Etiquette rules in the offline world are pretty clear: Say please and thank you; shake hands firmly; keep your elbows off the table. But what are the rules for interacting professionally online? Here are some guidelines for managing your e-manners.

Q: How often should I check LinkedIn?
A: While logging in daily is ideal, what’s most important is that you maintain a consistent presence and respond to messages and connection requests in a timely fashion. LinkedIn will send you a Network Update once a week or once a day -- you can use that email as a reminder to log in and send someone a note, respond to a request or post to a group discussion.

Q: How do I make sure my LinkedIn profile is professional?
A: First, be totally truthful and never stretch the facts -- remember that your profile is public. Next, post a photo that is professionally appropriate (no pets, quirky backgrounds or funny expressions). Finally, write up your experience and credentials as you would present them on a resume or cover letter. Your writing can be a little less formal on LinkedIn, but proper grammar, spelling and
proofreading are essential.

Q: What’s the best way to request to connect with someone?
A: LinkedIn provides a basic message “I'd like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn,” but it’s a good idea to customize your requests. You’ll get a better response rate if you write a brief, personalized, polite note to each potential connection reminding them how you met (if necessary) and explaining why you’re interested in connecting -- e.g., to ask for advice or to keep in touch after meeting at a conference.

Q: How do I ask for an introduction?
A: When you request an introduction, you’ll be prompted to write a note to your mutual connection and then a separate note to the person you want to meet. In both cases, draft a compelling subject line and a short note that introduces you and explains why you hope to connect. Just remember never to ask directly for a job -- it’s not polite or appropriate.

Q: What should I do if someone doesn’t respond to my connection request or message?
A: There is no guarantee that everyone you want to connect with will want to connect with you. If you haven’t heard from a potential connection in over a month, it’s okay to send that person an email to say that you’ve reached out and would like to connect. If that doesn’t work, it’s best to move on to people who are more interested or responsive.

Q: How do I handle a request from someone I don’t know or don’t want to connect with?
A: You can either reply with a short note requesting an explanation (“Hi - can you remind me how we know each other?”) or you can click “Archive” to ignore the request or save it for the future. If you definitely don’t want to connect, simply click “Archive” and move on. If you want to report the person as a spammer, then click “I don’t know this user.” Users who receive several of these clicks are
removed from LinkedIn.

Q: Will people know if I un-connect from them?
A: If you unconnect from someone, that person will not be alerted. Of course, if that person looks through his or her contacts or attempts to send you a message, you will no longer be shown as a 1stdegree connection.

Q: How many groups should I join?
A: The number of groups you belong to on LinkedIn should reflect approximately the number of professional affiliations you have (or want to have) in real life. For instance, if you attend college, are an accounting major and love social media, it would be great to join your alumni group, an accounting group or two and a social media group or two. To get the most benefit from group participation, quality trumps quantity.

Q: What is the most polite way to ask someone to write a recommendation for me?
A: Most importantly, you want to request recommendations from people who really know you and your work, such as former bosses or professors. Customize each Recommendation Request with a polite, gracious and personalized note, and provide a few words outlining the accomplishments or qualities this person might mention about you. And, of course, always thank the person for writing the
recommendation.

Q: What’s appropriate to write in my LinkedIn status updates?
A: Although LinkedIn status updates can cross-post with Twitter, be careful only to post professional comments to LinkedIn. This means no posts about the weather or your crazy cat. The best status updates are like snippets from a networking conversation: quick notes about events you’re attending, accomplishments you’re proud of, articles or books you’ve read and professional announcements like
a new position. Overall, use your judgment, be polite and act maturely. If you wouldn’t do it in person, don’t do it on LinkedIn!

Posted by kkowatch on October 18, 2010 at 10:14 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 18, 2010

In this Edition:
Mock Interviews @SI
International Career Events
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know?
Workshops/Programs
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Mock Interviews @SI
Ann Arbor District Library
Wednesday, October 20
1:00-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Monday, October 18 at 11:59 p.m.

UM Kresge Business Administration Library
Friday, October 22
Thursday, November 18
1:00-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 20 at 11:59 p.m.

Take advantage of this valuable opportunity to practice your interview skills. Employers are volunteering their time to help you practice and hone your interview skills. Even if the employer isn’t not a targeted employer for your job search, you can still gain some valuable feedback and skills to prepare you for upcoming interviews.

International Career Events
Global Careers in Engineering, Information and Technology
Tuesday, October 19
5:30-7:00 p.m.
Chrysler Center Lobby (North Campus)

This panel discussion regarding Global Careers in Engineering, Information and Technology will feature representatives from Schlumberger, Whirlpool, P3, Deloitte, IBM and an international student from India who had an internship in Shanghai.

This panel is part of the International Career Pathways events, which brings University of Michigan students together with educators and employers to explore pathways to international careers through opportunities for significant experiences abroad (work, internships, volunteering and research abroad) and international education, both on-campus and abroad.

Please RSVP for this event at https://www.engin.umich.edu/form/globalcareerspanel as light food will be served. Information regarding the International Career Pathways events is available online at http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt/work/resources/ICP

Careers in Global Health
Wednesday, October 20
5:00-6:30 p.m.
Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room

Representatives from organizations involved in various aspects of international health and humanitarian relief will share the paths they took to reach their current positions, as well as discuss the key elements to preparing for a successful career in international health. http://www.globalhealth.umich.edu/pdf/careersinglobalhealth.pdf

International Environmental Careers Panel
Wednesday, October 20
3:00-4:30 p.m.
1040 Dana Building

International Opportunities Fair
Thursday, October 21
2:00-6:00 p.m.
Michigan Union

The International Opportunities Fair is a great way to connect with organizations with an international focus right here on campus! Go to http://www.careercenter.umich.edu/students/events/intlfair.html for more information.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Foreign Services Officer Program
Friday, October 22
11:00 a.m.-Noon
School of Public Health, 1690 Crossroads Building (Lane Auditorium)

Come hear about opportunities through USAID’s Foreign Service Officer Program!

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Oct 25 Day in the Life of an Interaction Designer
Oct 27 Abbott Presentation
Oct 28 Electronic Publishing Webinar
Oct 29 UM Art, Architecture, and Engineering Library Mock Interviews
Oct 29 Career Talk with ALA Policy Office

Did You Know?
Menlo Innovations offers tours of their office space open to students (free pizza!). Check out this truly unique organizational culture. RSVP to attend - or if that doesn’t fit your schedule, check out other upcoming tour dates at http://www.menloinnovations.com/events/index.htm

410 N. 4th Avenue, 3rd Floor
Wednesday, October 20
5:00-6:00 p.m.

Workshops/Programs
Federal Internships: Find and Apply for Summer 2011
Wednesday, October 20
5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

This webinar, a product of the Partnership’s Making the Difference Campaign, is for students interested in finding and applyingfor internships for Summer 2011, as well as those advisors looking for more information about federal opportunities to share with their students. During this session, we will highlight a number of exciting internships across government, and show you how to research, find and apply for an internship that’s right for you.

SAA Day in the Life of a Digital Archivist
Thursday, October 21
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 North Quad

Digital Archivists from a range of units and organizations will come to SI to talk about their daily responsibilities, career paths, and related skills. Tips and advice will be shared on how to gain a career in this field, what skills and courses are most needed, and much more. Please bring questions!

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Kelly Kowatch (kkowatch@umich.edu)
Friday, October 22 from 2:00-3:00 p.m. - SI Student Lounge, North Quad

Emily Bowman Appointment/Walk-In Hours
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Wednesday, October 20 from Noon to 5:00 p.m. - 3360 North Quad
Friday, October 22 from Noon to 4:00 p.m. – 3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on October 18, 2010 at 08:48 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] 10 Online Job Hunting Tips

Checklist: 10 Online Job Hunting Tips

Want to increase your chances of landing a great job online? LinkedIn can help you find -- and attract -- the best opportunities. Here are some tips:

1. Make time
It’s easy to let job hunting fall to the bottom of your to-do list, but you can’t afford to let that happen. Schedule at least 15 minutes a day in your calendar to work on your resume, update and check online networking profiles and search job listings. Opportunities come and go quickly, so you need to be in the game on a daily basis.

2. Get noticed
What better way to impress a recruiter than to have a professional networking profile appear as the first search result for your name? Completing your LinkedIn profile to 100% with your education, experience, recommendations and group memberships will increase your search ranking and give employers a strong impression before you ever meet in person.

3. Be keyword savvy
Make sure your profile is chock-full of keywords that will attract a recruiter’s attention. Look through job postings and LinkedIn profiles that appeal to you and incorporate some of the same words or phrases. In addition to job- and industry specific words, recruiters also love leadership terms (captain, president) and action words (managed, designed).

4. Reach out
Connect on LinkedIn with everyone you know -- friends, family, neighbors, professors, family friends, internship colleagues and others. Once you’re connected, send each person a friendly message on LinkedIn, asking if they would keep an eye out for the particular kind of job or jobs you’re seeking or if they can introduce you to other helpful contacts.

5. Spread the word
To build your credibility and stay on people’s radar screens during your job hunt, regularly update your status on LinkedIn and other social networks. You might share links to articles you think would be relevant to people in your field (to show you are up on the news), announcements about events you’re attending (to show that you are actively networking) and good career news (to show that you’re headed for success). Just remember to keep your updates clean and appropriate.

6. Get into groups
Beyond connecting to individuals, join LinkedIn groups related to your alma mater, professional associations, volunteer organizations and industries you want to join. Every discussion in which you comment is an opportunity to market yourself to people who might be hiring, and every group contains a “Jobs” tab where members post opportunities to one another.

7. Search high and low
What makes LinkedIn’s job postings different from others is that they don’t just tell you who is hiring, they tell you how you are personally connected to that company through your network. Even when you see a job listed on another site, LinkedIn can help you research people at that company and tell you how you are personally connected through your network. No matter where you look for jobs, cast a wider net by altering your search terms and location criteria from time to time.

8. Follow companies
When you see a job you like on another job board, use LinkedIn as a company research tool. Check out the LinkedIn Company Page of any organization where you’d like to work and click “Follow company.” Activities of that organization on LinkedIn (job postings, hires, announcements) will appear on your homepage and alert you to potential opportunities.

9. Persist (without pestering)
While you don’t want to be a pest, persistence is a very important component of the job search process. Sending followup messages through LinkedIn can help you stand out from other candidates. Every time you send someone a message through LinkedIn, the recruiter or hiring manager can easily click over to your profile and check out your credentials.

10. Consider Job Seeker Premium
Once you have a strong LinkedIn profile, you want to make sure it gets to the top of recruiters’ inboxes when you apply for jobs. LinkedIn offers an upgrade feature called Job Seeker Premium that, among other benefits, places your profile at the top of the list of applicants to the jobs you apply for on LinkedIn. Premium subscribers are twice as likely to be contacted by recruiters and 80% more likely to be found in search. Check it out at http://www.linkedin.com/jobseeker.

Posted by kkowatch on October 15, 2010 at 09:21 AM | Comments (0)

[Employers@SI] Abbott Labs - Abbott Park, Illinois

Abbott Labs will be on campus Wednesday, October 27, 2010 for an employer presentation and interviews.

About Abbott:
We are a global, broad-based health care company devoted to discovering new medicines, new technologies and new ways to manage health. Our products span the continuum of care, from nutritional products and laboratory diagnostics through medical devices and pharmaceutical therapies. Our comprehensive line of products encircles life itself - addressing important health needs from infancy to the golden years.

Abbott has sales, manufacturing, research and development, and distribution facilities around the world, close to where our customers need us to be. We are recognized for our global reach and our ability to serve our customers around the world.

On-Campus Recruiting at SI:
• Corporate Records Information Session, Wed. Oct 27th, 12:00-1:30, Ehrlicher Room - Sign up is required through iTrack! Lunch is provided.
• Corporate Records Summer 2011 Internship Interviews, Wed. Oct 27th 1:30-4:30 3360 NQ

To be considered for an interview, apply through iTrack by Oct. 18th (at midnight). For either of these postings (they are the same so only apply for one):
• Corporate Records Intern, Job #715559
• Corporate Records Intern, Job#715558

You MUST have an approved resume in iTrack to be able to apply. If you don't have an approved resume in iTrack, remember that it takes at least one business day for our staff to review resumes. If you won't meet the deadline, please contact si.careers@umich.edu to indicate your resume is waiting for approval in iTrack. However, we can't guarantee we will be able to review it, and will simply approve with no review, if needed.

Contact the SI Career Development Office with any questions.

Posted by kkowatch on October 15, 2010 at 09:04 AM | Comments (0)

Library Mock Interviews at UMSI - Fall 2010

The UM Art, Architecture & Engineering Library will be on campus Friday, October 29th to participate in mock interviews.

Participating in mock interviews can be a key step towards internship or job search success. You will participate in a simulated interview and the employer will provide you with feedback on how to improve your interviewing skills. Don’t wait until the real thing to learn how comfortable you are with interviewing!


Keep in mind, if the organization or positions offered aren’t exactly what you are targeting, that’s okay – sign up anyway! The feedback you’ll receive will be helpful for your job search no matter what.

Wednesday, October 20th
Ann Arbor District Library – Production Libraria
n (1 slot available)
Note: Schedule closes Monday, October 18th at 11:59pm

Friday, October 22nd
UM Kresge Business Administration Library – Business Reference Librarian
(1 slot available)
Note: Schedule closes Wednesday, October 20th at 11:59pm

Friday, October 29th
UM Art, Architecture, & Engineering Library – Science Librarian
(5 slots available)
Note: Schedule closes Wednesday, October 27th at 11:59pm

Thursday, November 18th
UM Kresge Business Administration Library – Business Reference Librarian
(3 slots available)
Note: Schedule closes Tuesday, November 16th at 11:59pm

To sign up, login to iTrack at http://si.umich.edu/careers/students.htm. You must have an approved resume on iTrack in order to sign up for a slot. Then, click on “Campus Interviews I Qualify” For to view the listings.

If you have questions, please contact the SI Career Development Office.

Posted by kkowatch on October 14, 2010 at 04:08 PM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] How to Conduct Essential Employer Research on LinkedIn

We're halfway through our How to Use LinkedIn Effectively Series. We hope that you are learning about valuable tips to aid in your successful job search!

How to Conduct Essential Employer Research on LinkedIn

One of recruiters’ biggest complaints about entry-level job candidates is their lack of knowledge about an employer’s organization. Before attending a career fair, networking meeting, or job interview, you must do your homework. Here are some tips on how to use LinkedIn to research effectively and gain an advantage over your less-prepared peers.

1. Be open to new opportunities
While you may have some idea of the company you want to work for, there are lots of opportunities at organizations you’ve never even heard of. Keep an open mind as you conduct your research and remember that the wider you expand your search, the more likely you are to find a great job.

2. Just start searching
LinkedIn’s Advanced Search is a powerful tool for job seekers like you. Simply type in any keyword -- “marketing,” “accounting,” “theater,” “baseball,” “Seattle,” India,” anything -- and you’ll see the LinkedIn profiles of people whose careers include that keyword. This is a great way to explore potential career paths and to learn about companies or job titles that might be a perfect fit for you. Save your searches to keep a record of careers and people that interest you.

3. Put yourself in good Company (Pages)
As you find employers you might want to work for, check out their LinkedIn Company Pages. Each page provides a wealth of information about an organization’s operations, employees, locations, available jobs, and more. Plus, when you visit any of the 150,000 Company Pages on LinkedIn, you’ll see how you are personally connected to people at that organization. Then you can reach out for advice or to request informational interviews and referrals to open positions. Not connected to anyone at your target company? Join a university alumni,industry, or interest group.

4. Know before you go
It’s the night before a big career fair, informational interview, or job interview and you’re feeling really nervous. Calm those jitters by using LinkedIn to research the person or people you’ll be meeting. You can discover facts about someone’s education, work experience, interests, group memberships, and connections you might have in common. This will make you feel more prepared and confident and provide you with some good conversation starters.

5. Follow the buzz
Want to keep up to the nanosecond with a particular company’s news and image? Add the LinkedIn Company Buzz application and you’ll be able to view a constant feed of everything people are saying about that organization on Twitter. This is an absolute must the night before a big job interview!

Posted by kkowatch on October 14, 2010 at 09:30 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] How to Find Your Career Passion

Day Three in our How to Use LinkedIn Effectively Series....

Checklist: How to Find Your Career Passion

Everyone tells you to “Do what you love!” It’s great advice, but what if you don’t yet know what kind of work will be most fulfilling? Check out the ways that LinkedIn can help you find your professional passion.

Search high and low
Pick absolutely anything that interests you and type that word or phrase into the “Advanced Search” box on LinkedIn. For instance, let’s say you love basketball. Just type “basketball” and your results will include the profiles of anyone on LinkedIn who mentions the sport in his or her profile. Review these profiles to discover
the professional and educational experience, skills and qualities needed to land various positions related to basketball and see if any organizations, job functions or groups in these peoples’ profiles catch your eye as potential options for you. Don’t love what you find? Try searching on a different term!

Be a joiner
You can join groups on LinkedIn related to any career interest that even vaguely appeals to you. Go ahead and explore! If you like cooking, join a group for professional chefs. If you’ve fantasized about starting your own business, join a group for entrepreneurs. Then, if you find yourself really engaged in the content, start
contributing to discussions and connecting with other members. Your interest may be an indication that this is a career path you should pursue. On the other hand, if you lose interest after receiving a few updates from a group, then that profession might not be the best choice for you.

Eavesdrop on employers
You might have a few organizations in your mind that sound like good places to work -- organizations you’ve seen around campus or heard about through your friends or family -- but you’re not sure exactly what kinds of jobs exist at that company or even what that company actually does. LinkedIn Company Pages will give you insight into any organization’s employees, divisions and types of jobs. Plus, by “following” any company on LinkedIn, you can “listen in” on their news, events, announcements and more. Company Pages provide a
window into a company’s culture as well as alerting you to available positions.

Be curious
Once you’ve explored some things you know you’re interested in, start expanding your horizons. Scan the discussions in your college’s LinkedIn Group and read about something new and different. Click on the “Jobs” tab on LinkedIn and start searching through thousands of unique possibilities. You can limit your job search to
positions within 10 miles from home or broaden it to include cities around the world. Finding job openings in Paris or Sydney is just as easy as finding a job down the street. Play around. Experiment. It’s quick, it’s easy, and it’s free. You never know what might ignite a passion.

Connect with passionate people
Look around your life for other people who share your passions -- or any passion. Just as you should connect on LinkedIn with people who share your alma mater or a past internship employer, you should also connect with people who share your personal interests or hobbies. Look for people who inspire you in groups and send them a connection request asking for a few words of wisdom. Most passionate people are happy to share their excitement about what they do.

Don’t be afraid to fail
It’s unlikely that you’ll find your passion just by sitting at your computer. You have to go out in the world and try new things. Do more volunteering, take on part-time work, sign up for a class in something you’ve never studied. Use LinkedIn to discover your passion and find opportunities, and then get out there and take action! Your path is out there, just waiting to be discovered.

Visit the Learning Center at http://learn.linkedin.com/students for more tips and advice on making the most of LinkedIn!

Posted by kkowatch on October 13, 2010 at 10:20 AM | Comments (0)

International Events at UM including 50th Anniversary Peace Corps Celebration

It all started here. University of Michigan students helped shape history, and you are invited to join the celebration.

At 2:00 a.m. on October 14, 1960, standing on the steps of the Michigan Union, U.S. Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy delivered an impromptu speech before thousands of U-M students who had waited for hours. He shared for the first time his vision of a corps of American volunteers who would travel the world to work for peace.

U-M students jumped into action, leading the petition drive in support of Kennedy's dream. Their efforts traveled to campuses all around the country. A few months later, the Peace Corps was established.

Fifty years later, the national celebration of the Peace Corps will kick off at U-M, and U-M students will be at the center of the action.

A full schedule of events is available at http://peacecorps.umich.edu/events.html.

******Highlights of Peace Corps 50th Celebration Events******

Documentary: “A Passing of the Torch”
Monday Oct. 11– 7 p.m.
Hatcher Graduate Library, Library Gallery (Room 100)
And don’t miss the wonderful exhibit in the Hatcher Graduate Library about how University of Michigan students advocated for Peace Corps, on display in October and November


Documentary: “Atumpan: The Talking Drums of Ghana”
Tuesday Oct. 12– 6:30 p.m.
African Studies Center @ International Institute; Room 1636, School of Social Work Bldg


National Symposium: The Future of International Service
Wednesday Oct. 13, 8:30AM – 5:30PM
Blau Auditorium, Ross School of Business

For panels and presenters see: http://peacecorps.umich.edu/natl-details.html . This symposium features speakers and panelists who are national and world leaders in international service. The event will focus on new initiatives, research and policies related to global service and kicks off a year-long series of events across the nation that will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Peace Corps. Sponsored by the University of Michigan, The Brookings Institution, and the National Peace Corps Association, with support from the Building Bridges Coalition. All are welcome to attend this free conference!


Paul Theroux: How the Peace Corps Changed My Life
Wednesday Oct. 13 – 7 p.m.
Hatcher Library, Room 100/Gallery
American travel writer and novelist will discuss the impact of the Peace Corps on his life.


Student Symposium: Challenges and Opportunities of International Service
Wednesday evening Oct. 13 – 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Pendleton Room, Michigan Union
Please note that space is limited; students who preregistered will have priority.


Documentary: “A Passing of the Torch”
Early Thursday Oct. 14 – 1 a.m.
Michigan Union steps


First Ceremony on Michigan Union steps
Oct. 14 – 2 a.m.
Program will include audio of JFK's speech followed by remembrances of those who were there on the steps the night of October 14, 1960. Special guest speaker will be Dr. Alan Guskin, student leader in 1960 who with others advocated for the creation of the Peace Corps.


Second Ceremony on the Michigan Union steps
Thursday Oct. 14 – 11 a.m.
Participate with special guests in the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of JFK’s speech that led to the creation of the Peace Corps. Special guest speakers include former Kennedy aide and architect of the Peace Corps, Sen. Harris Wofford; Jack Hood Vaughn, second director of the Peace Corps and U-M alumnus; and Aaron Williams, current director of the Peace Corps.


Spending Your Days in Ghana: Responding to JFK’s Challenge – Symposium
Thursday Oct. 14 – 1:30-5:00 PM
Pendleton Room, Michigan Union
JFK asked, “How many of you who are going to be doctors are willing to spend your days in Ghana?” Learn about the U-M’s long history—and exciting future—in Ghana and how both Ghana and U-M have benefitted from partnerships in a number of fields including medicine, engineering, technology and museum studies.


Peace Corps Director Aaron Williams: Inspiring the Next Generation of Volunteers
Thursday Oct. 14 – 6:30 p.m.
Kuenzel Room, Michigan Unio
n
Calling all future Peace Corps Volunteers! Peace Corps has thousands of new volunteer positions available for 2011. Learn more about the personal and professional rewards of international Peace Corps service.


Tom Hayden: The Importance of Community Organizing: From the Peace Corps to Barack Obama
Thursday Oct. 14 – 8 p.m.
Hatcher Library

Program will include audio of JFK's speech followed by remembrances of those who were there on the steps the night of October 14, 1960. Special guest speaker will be Dr. Alan Guskin, student leader in 1960 who with others advocated for the creation of the Peace Corps.

Complete list of events: http://peacecorps.umich.edu/events.html

We hope you will participate in the celebration -- a tribute to the Peace Corps and to the legacy of U-M student commitment to activism and service.

Go Blue!

E. Royster Harper
Vice President for Student Affairs
John Greisberger, Director, University of Michigan International Center
Bill Nolting and Kelly Nelson, University of Michigan International Center, Education Abroad and Peace Corps Offices

Posted by kkowatch on October 12, 2010 at 03:54 PM | Comments (0)

[events] Speed Networking with the SI Alumni Board - Friday

Don’t miss out on this rare networking opportunity! Only a few more spaces available!

Speed Networking with the SI Alumni Board
Friday, Oct 15th
12:00-1:30
Ehlicher Room NQ

RSVP now through iTrack -- space is limited! We will cap the attendance at 25, so the first 25 to sign up will get in. Lunch will be provided!

Take advantage of this rare opportunity to network with the SI Alumni Board. This is a structured networking activity where you can learn how to effectively network while gathering valuable career and job search advice from prominent SI alumni.

Event Format:
You and 4 other students will be seated at a table with one of the alumni board members. We will provide you with brief bios for each ahead of time. You will have 10 minutes to introduce yourself, ask questions and gather career information. Please come prepared with a few questions that you would like each board member to answer. After 10 minutes, a bell will ring, and you will rotate to the next table and so on. Remember, you can get valuable information even from someone who isn’t in your industry of choice—so please be open to meeting with all of the alumni board members. You will have the opportunity to rotate to each table to network with each board member. Shortly after 1:00, if you don’t have class, stick around for some general networking and continued discussions with the board.


SI ALUMNI BOARD PARTICIPANTS:

Eva Davis
Eva graduated from SI with a specialization in Library and Information Services. During school, she completed an internship at the Plymouth District Library in Michigan, and her graduation coincided with a posting for a teen librarian. Josie Parker (MILS '96), director of the Ann Arbor District Library, recruited Eva to become youth manager at the downtown location in 2002. She describes the AADL as a rollercoaster ride of challenges, change, and opportunity. "I became the systemwide youth services manager in 2003, the branch services manager in 2005, and associate director of public services in 2006," she adds. "One of the things I have most enjoyed is my experience managing our internship program for library school students, and I welcome the opportunity to bring alumni and current SI students together." She has been director of the Canton Public Library since January 2008.

Ken Varnum
Ken is the manager of Library Web Systems at the University of Michigan library. His responsibilities include managing the library's Web and article discovery environments. Before coming to the University of Michigan in 2007, Ken previously worked at Tufts University (2004-07), Ford Motor Company's research library (1997-2004), and the Open Media Research Institute in Prague, Czech Republic (1995-97). He has master's degrees in library studies and Russian and East European studies from the University of Michigan and a BA in history and Russian from Grinnell College.

Andrew MacLaren
Andrew graduated from SI in 2007 with a specialization in Library and Information Science. Since 2007 he has held the position of Productions Librarian at the Ann Arbor District Library. In this role, he serves as the library website content editor and oversees the creation of digital products, which primarily involves the digitization of local history resources.

Lija Hogan
Lija is a usability team lead at ForeSee Results. She evaluates the usability of websites across a variety of industries, including government, retail, finance, healthcare, and consumer package goods. She has also been an interaction designer and information architect across many of these industries. In addition to her MSI (LIS) from the University of Michigan, she has an MLA from the University of Chicago and a BA in history and Russian from the University of Pennsylvania.

Christina York
Christina York is the User Experience Manager at ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. ITHAKA’s User Experience Design team currently has eight members specializing in information architecture, usability, interaction design, and visual design. In the past year, Christina has hired three team members from SI.

Christina has a Master’s in Library and Information Science from Wayne State University. She graduated in 2002 and has worked in academic, corporate, and not-for-profit environments for the last 8 years. She is active in the professional community and has given talks at several events this year, including IUE 2010 in Ann Arbor, MI-UPA meetings, and the 2010 Usability Professionals Association Conference in Munich.

Posted by kkowatch on October 12, 2010 at 10:03 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] How to Network Professionally Online

Day Two in our How to Use LinkedIn Effectively Series....

How to Network Professionally Online

You’ve heard it a million times (so it wouldn’t hurt to hear it again): “Success is not just about what you know; it’s about
who you know.” With LinkedIn, the world’s largest professional online network, the “who” is at your fingertips. Follow these
easy steps to get connected now—and to turn those connections into opportunities.

1. 100% complete = 100% more likely to get noticed
You can’t build connections if people don’t know you exist or see what you have to offer. Your LinkedIn profile is your online business card, your resume, and your letters of rec all in one. Don’t be shy: users with complete profiles are 40 times more likely to receive opportunities through LinkedIn.

2. You’re more experienced than you think
Complete profiles are so important because the more information you provide, the more people will find reasons to connect with you. Think really broadly about all the experience you have, including summer jobs, unpaid internships, volunteer work, and student organizations. You never know what might catch someone’s eye.

3. Use your inbox
Contrary to popular belief, networking doesn’t mean reaching out to strangers. The best networks begin with those you know and trust, and then grow based on personal referrals. Start building your LinkedIn network by uploading your online address book and connecting to friends, relatives, internship colleagues, and professionals you know in the “real world.”

4. Get personal
As you build your connections on LinkedIn, always customize your connection requests with a friendly note and, if necessary, a reminder of where you met or what organization you have in common. If you’re being referred by a mutual friend, write a brief intro of who you are and why you’d like to connect. You’ll impress people with your personal touch.

5. Join the “in” crowd
Another way to form new online relationships is to join LinkedIn Groups. Start with your university group—alums love to connect with students—and then find volunteer organizations or professional associations you already belong to. As a member, you can comment on discussions, find exclusive job listings, and meet people who share common interests.

6. Lend a (virtual) hand
As you build connections and group memberships, think about what you can do to support other people. Comment on a classmate’s status update, forward a job listing that fits the criteria of a friend, or write a recommendation for a summer job colleague. You’ll find that your generosity is always rewarded (and, of course, it feels really good to help someone!).

7. Update your status #early and #often
Networking is not just about who you know; it’s about who knows you. Stay on other people’s radar screens by updating your LinkedIn status at least once a week—you can do this directly on LinkedIn or by linking your Twitter account and marking tweets with #in. Mention events you’re attending, projects you’ve completed, and other professional news.

8. Question (and answer) everything
LinkedIn’s Answers feature is a great place to seek advice from a wide variety of people all around the world. You can also show the world what you have to offer by answering people’s questions about a topic where you have some expertise. The more active you are in Answers, the more people will view your profile and want to connect with you.

9. Do your homework
Before an informational interview, a job interview, or a networking get-together, use LinkedIn to learn about the background and interests of the people you’re scheduled to meet. Access Company Pages to research organizations and their employees, and use Advanced Search to find things you have in common with people you’re meeting.

10. Now step away from the computer...
There’s a perception that young people are only comfortable communicating online, so be sure to support your online networking with real human contact. Set up phone calls, attend live events, and send snail mail notes to people you interact with on LinkedIn. Remember that online methods should supplement, not replace, in-person relationship-building.

Posted by kkowatch on October 12, 2010 at 09:47 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 11, 2010

In this Edition:
Application Deadlines
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know?
Workshops/Programs
Other Career Events on Campus
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Application Deadlines
Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF)
For those of you planning on applying to the Presidential Management Fellowship program, the application on usajobs.gov is now open until October 15th.

Steps to take for nomination consideration:
• Apply through usajobs.gov (develop your federal resume through the system)
• Print out the nomination form
• Submit nomination form, resume, unofficial transcripts, along with a brief essary (Why Do I Want to Be a PMF?) to Joanna Kroll by October 15th at midnight.
• Students who are selected for nomination will be notified by October 29th

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Ann Arbor District Library Mock Interviews
Wednesday, October 20 - 1 slot available
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Monday, October 18 at 11:59 p.m.

Federal Internships: Find and Apply for Summer 2011
Wednesday, October 20
5:00-6:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

UM Kresge Business Administration Library Mock Interviews
Friday, October 22 - 1 slot available
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 20 at 11:59 p.m.

Abbott Information Session
Wednesday, October 27
Noon-1:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Careers in Electronic Publishing Webinar
Thursday, October 28
3:00-4:00 p.m.
4446 North Quad

Career Talk with the ALA Policy Office
Friday, October 29
Noon-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Did You Know?
Welcome Wednesdays
8 a.m.-Noon
UM Alumni Center

Stop by the Alumni Center for free bagels and coffee and enjoy comfortable chairs, free WiFi and TV!

Workshops/Programs
A Day in the Life of an... Entrepreneur Panel
Tuesday, October 12
5-6:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Panelists include:
• Dug Song, Founder of Scio Security
• John Wood, Founder of Functional Hand Strength
• Peter Morville, President, Semantic Studios
• Hung Truong, Creater of MapsKrieg, Notocentric and AnimeNano

Each panelist will speak about their path to becoming an entrepreneur and share about their challenges and successes, highlighting tips for those that are considering being an entrepreneur.

We will be serving pizza at this session, so please RSVP on iTrack so that we have enough for everyone.

What Can You Do With an MSI? Information Analysis and Retrieval
Thursday, October 14
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 North Quad

In this session, the Information Analysis and Retrieval specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Speed Networking with SI Alumni Board
Friday, October 15
Noon-1:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Take advantage of this rare opportunity to network with the SI Alumni Board and other prominent SI alumni. This is a structured networking activity where you can learn how to effectively network while applying what you learn.

Other Career Events on Campus
International Career Pathway Series: German-American Career Day
Tuesday, October 12
5:00-7:00 p.m.
Vandenberg Room, Michigan League

50 Years of Peace Corps at University of Michigan
Wednesday, October 13 - Saturday, October 16
http://peacecorps.umich.edu

30-Minute Mentors
Friday, October 22
11:00-5:00 p.m.
UM Alumni Center

Got 30 Minutes? Get a Michigan Mentor. Talk one-on-one with successful Michigan alumni in a variety of career fields. Register at www.umalumni.com/students.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Joanna Kroll (jckroll@umich.edu)
Tuesday, October 12 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. - 3360 North Quad

Kelly Kowatch (kkowatch@umich.edu)
Thursday, October 14 from 10:00-Noon - 3360 North Quad
Friday, October 15 from 10:30-11:30 am - SI Student Lounge, North Quad

Emily Bowman Appointment/Walk-In Hours
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on October 11, 2010 at 02:36 PM | Comments (0)

Interested in a Federal Career? Consider the Presidential Management Fellowship Program

For those of you planning on applying to the Presidential Management Fellowship (PMF) program, the application on usajobs.gov is now open until October 15th, 2010.

The purpose of the PMF Program is to attract to the Federal service outstanding men and women from a variety of academic disciplines and career paths who have a clear interest in, and commitment to, excellence in the leadership and management of public policies and programs.

Steps to take for nomination consideration:
• Apply through usajobs.gov (develop your federal resume through the system)
• Print out the nomination form
• Submit nomination form, resume, unofficial transcripts, along with a brief essay (Why Do I Want to Be a PMF?) to Joanna Kroll by Oct 15th at midnight.
• Students who are selected for nomination will be notified by Oct 29th.

Please let me know if you have any questions. I have attached the PMF presentation to this email that covers all of the details and key deadlines (for those that missed the information session in Sept).

Good luck!

Joanna Kroll
Sr. Associate Director of Career Development
University of Michigan School of Information
ph 734-615-8294 fax 734-615-3587

Posted by kkowatch on October 11, 2010 at 01:02 PM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] How to Build a Professional Student LinkedIn Profile

This week, the SI CDO will feature a five-part series on how to use The online networking resource, LinkedIn.

How to Build a Professional Student LinkedIn Profile

Think of your LinkedIn profile as an interactive business card. It’s a summary of your professional experience, interests, and capabilities that is designed to attract the attention of important people who are searching for you online — recruiters, networking contacts, and grad school admissions officers. A strong profile is a key differentiator in the job market. So let’s get started...

1. Craft an informative profile headline
Your profile headline gives people a short, memorable way to understand who you are in a professional context. Think of the headline as the slogan for your professional brand, such as “Student, National University” or “Recent honors grad seeking marketing position.” Check out the profiles of students and recent alums you admire for ideas and inspiration.

2. Display an appropriate photo
Remember that LinkedIn is not Facebook or MySpace. If you choose to post a photograph — and we recommend that you do — select a professional, high-quality headshot of you alone. Party photos, cartoon avatars, and cute pics of your puppy don’t fit in the professional environment of LinkedIn.

3. Show off your education
Be sure to include information about all institutions you’ve attended. Include your major and minor if you have one, as well
as highlights of your activities. It’s also appropriate to include study abroad programs and summer institutes. Don’t be shy — your LinkedIn profile is an appropriate place to show off your strong GPA and any honors or awards you’ve won.

4. Develop a professional summary statement
Your summary statement should resemble the first few paragraphs of your best-written cover letter — concise and confident about your goals and qualifications. Remember to include relevant internships, volunteer work, and extracurriculars. Present your summary statement in short blocks of text for easy reading. Bullet points are great, too.

5. Fill your “Specialties” section with keywords
“Specialties” is the place to include key words and phrases that a recruiter or hiring manager might type into a search engine to find a person like you. The best place to find relevant keywords is in the job listings that appeal to you and the LinkedIn profiles of people who currently hold the kinds of positions you want.

6. Update your status weekly
A great way to stay on other people’s radar screens and enhance your professional image is to update your status at least once a week. Tell people about events you’re attending, major projects you’ve completed, professional books you’re reading, or any other news that you would tell someone at a networking reception or on a quick catch-up phone call.

7. Show your connectedness with LinkedIn Group badges
Joining Groups and displaying the group badges on your profile are the perfect ways to fill out the professionalism of your profile and show your desire to connect to people with whom you have something in common. Most students start by joining their university’s LinkedIn group as well as the larger industry groups related to the career they want to pursue.

8. Collect diverse recommendations
Nothing builds credibility like third-party endorsements. The most impressive LinkedIn profiles have at least one recommendation associated with each position a person has held. Think about soliciting recommendations from professors, internship coordinators and colleagues, employers, and professional mentors.

9. Claim your unique LinkedIn URL
To increase the professional results that appear when people type your name into a search engine, set your LinkedIn profile to “public” and claim a unique URL for your profile (for example: www.linkedin.com/in/yourname). This also makes it easier to include your LinkedIn URL in your email signature, which is a great way to demonstrate your professionalism.

10. Share your work
A final way to enhance your LinkedIn profile is to add examples of your writing, design work, or other accomplishments by displaying URLs or adding LinkedIn Applications. By including URLs, you can direct people to your website, blog, or Twitter feed. Through Applications, you can share a PowerPoint or store a downloadable version of your resume.

Posted by kkowatch on October 11, 2010 at 11:04 AM | Comments (0)

Finding Your Career Passion

The following article is by a Guest Blogger from TechMediaNetwork.

For many students, choosing a Specialization is the most difficult part of their college experience as it means committing to a chosen profession despite obvious inexperience in the field. This leads many students to change majors frequently, wasting valuable time and resources, and creates undue anxiety among uncertain students who are afraid to commit wholeheartedly to an unknown.

Fortunately, there are many, many resources, both on campus and off, to help students learn about prospective careers and be able to feel comfortable and passionate about embarking down a particular career path.

The School of Information (http://www.si.umich.edu/) in the North Quad offices for example, offers students a comprehensive Career Development Office to navigate the myriad career possibilities including Career Counseling, Internships and Employer Research, to name just a few.

There are also many incredible resources online that can help a student winnow down the career options, such as NorthOrion.com(http://www.northorion.com/careers) which offers in-depth information on a vast selection of professions and trades.

When choosing a Specialization and finding your career passion, there are a few essential factors students should consider:

Skills and talents—If you are a born writer, you aren’t much good at math and don’t enjoy it, it wouldn’t make any sense at all to struggle to become a math teacher and then not enjoy your job each day. By the time you reach college age, you will have acquired many talents and it’s important to recognize that they’ve become your talents because they are things you enjoyed doing growing up. So, start by writing down your skills and talents and brainstorming careers where they might be employed.

Interests—Being very interested in your profession will bring continuous fulfillment throughout your career and is crucial to consider when preparing to enter the workforce. A very wise woman once said, “Do what you love and the rest will follow…the money, career advancement, everything.” This sage advice has proved true time and again and is a good rule of thumb when choosing between careers.

Marketability—You may be passionate about and good at underwater basket weaving, but you must consider whether there is a market for your particular trade. If you search the want ads or internet and can’t find a single job listing for underwater basket weavers, you may want to reconsider your career choice. On the flip side, you should consider whether a market is completely saturated with talented and more experienced candidates.

Potential Earning Capability—Although this shouldn’t be your primary focus in finding your career passion, it will play a definite role in deterring you if entering the field means taking a 50% pay cut from your part-time college job. You must consider whether your prospective job will pay even modest bills. If not, then you might consider making that your hobby, volunteer work or part-time job and choosing another profession as your primary career.

Ultimately, if you use the resources as your disposal to research careers, find one you will enjoy, be good at and works with the life you want, and you will indeed find your career passion.

Posted by kkowatch on October 08, 2010 at 03:48 PM | Comments (0)

Developing a Resume With Help From SI-CDO

There aren’t too many folks out there that would argue with the fact that your resume is the most important document you will ever write. And the folks that would, would probably be arguing about calling it a curriculum vita (CV) instead of a resume. But those folks are likely academics or Europeans, so pay them no mind (unless, of course, you meet that description... or hope to be hired by one!).

Yes, this is one written work that you really ought to put your all into, even if that means hiring someone else to do it. I’m sure we can all agree that writing your resume isn’t necessarily fun--even hiring someone to write your resume doesn’t get you off the hook entirely--but start off with some good, solid effort and give it a little TLC every few months, and you will always have an impressive, up-to-date resume that is sure to land you an interview for that job you’ve been dreaming about.

Thankfully, the SI Career Development Office has a complete resume and cover letter writing guide that can help you figure out how to best present all of the amazing things you’ve done in your career in one or two short pages. As the SI-CDO points out in the guide, there are a number of ways to format and present yourself in a resume... while there are best practices, there is no absolutely right way to do it. It is all about highlighting your strengths as a candidate, which will not only be different for each person, but also for each position to which you apply.

Now that you’ve got a hard copy to impress everyone with, here’s the fun part: get it on the web! Digital and interactive resumes are on the rise in nearly all fields and adopting this strategy now will give you an edge in more ways than one. Interactive resumes, from social resumes to Visual CV’s, engage the reader (hopefully the hiring manager for that job you’re dreaming about) and provide the opportunity to showcase skills and information that would be difficult to include on a paper resume. Some folks are even taking to video to summarize not only their experience, but also their personalities.

While some of these methods may not suit your style, the bare minimum for a professional digital presence is your LinkedIn profile . Seriously, if you don’t have a complete profile set up, you are missing out on an effective method of showcasing what you can do, a boost for your name’s page rank, and countless opportunities to connect and network with people who could potentially lead you to your next job.

So, go forth SI’ers... knock out that killer resume! The SI-CDO provides some awesome resources (including specialization-specific info) on the SI Career Development cTools site. And if you can’t find what you are looking for there, the SI-CDO staff is always available to help.

Posted by embow on October 08, 2010 at 11:51 AM | Comments (0)

Entrepreneurship at SI and In Detroit

On Tuesday, the UM SI-CDO office will host its first "A Day in the Life of an Entrepreneur" event, featuring a panel of 4 local entrepreneurs. Register on iTrack to attend.

With this topic on my mind, I wanted to share the following article that came to me via means of Ann Arbor Spark:

Inc. - 5 Reasons to Start a Business in Detroit

Despite the decline of its vital auto industry, Detroit aims to become a more diversified, sustainable economy for the 21st century. Here are five reasons why it will succeed.

By Evan Klonsky | Oct 7, 2010

There's no hiding the fact that the past decade hasn't been easy on the Motor City. Once a paragon of stability and the nation's fourth largest city, Detroit has seemed to fade alongside the auto industry on which it so vitally depends – now sitting at 11th place on that very same list.


In spite of the decline, those who stay refuse to see this as an anything other than an opportunity. With tons of open space, inexpensive rent, and legions of talented workers, the city was – and is – ripe for the kind of fresh and innovative thinking that drives new business. "Detroit needed to decrease its reliance on manufacturing," says Ross Sanders, CEO of Bizdom U, a local business accelerator formed in 2007. It needed to transform into a "brain economy," he adds, rooted in innovation and entrepreneurship.

Bizdom U, founded and funded by Quicken Loans CEO Dan Gilbert, is among the many organizations formed the past few years with the aim of diversifying and sustaining business in the region. These places recognized the ingredients – the new ideas, the support, the passion – already in place to make Detroit into a 21st century economy.

"The entrepreneurial spirit that exists in this region has been here forever," says David Egner, director of the New Economy Initiative for Southeast Michigan. What organizations like his have done is shine a light back on would-be entrepreneurs and provide them the resources to start strong.

While returns remain modest, small ripples of new businesses have begun to pop up around the city’s tri-county area. Ranging from high-tech battery-makers to downtown storefronts, these new businesses hope to grow into the impending wave of prosperity down the road. Here are five reasons why they will succeed.

1. Innovation is in the air.

Egner of the New Economy Initiative isn't hyperbolizing when he talks about Detroit's unique, longstanding entrepreneurial spirit. He's just trying to characterize a city that paved the way for automotive innovation for more than 70 years. The problem, however, was that the city became extremely rooted in its past success.

Perhaps too rooted. "What's held Detroit back has been the success of entrepreneurs in the last century," says Chris Rizik, one of the region's most prominent venture capitalists.

"What it created were two generations of employees, not of entrepreneurs," says Rizik, whose Renaissance Venture Capital Fund invests only in Michigan start-ups.

Once the large corporations – or the "safety net" as Rizik describes them collectively – began to falter, many of their employees were left jobless. "People had the choice to stay and do things more entrepreneurial, or leave," Rizik adds.

Ah: a silver lining. Those who stayed have started to bring about dramatic changes in the culture, not unlike New Orleanians after the flood.

To see the change, you needn’t look further than the SPARK Business Accelerator in Ann Arbor. Located 45 miles outside the city center, SPARK has helped more than 200 innovation-related start-ups in the region. Its convenient location next to one of the world's leading research institutions – the University of Michigan – doesn't hurt either. "We think Ann Arbor represents a wonderful hub of activity that can serve as a catalyst for the rest of the state of Michigan," says Michael Finney, president and CEO of SPARK.

Entrepreneurs also look to the region's automotive pedigree to tackle new industries. They can parlay the region's swath of talented engineers to make innovations in areas like battery technology, which Rizik says fits "hand-in-glove" with the auto industry. SPARK has, in fact, sought funding for a few battery makers in Ann Arbor, aiming to establish Michigan as a leader in the technology for the rest of the country.

2. Training and support abound.

Integral to the success of any entrepreneur is, after all, having the right tools get there. Organizations like Bizdom U and the Kauffman Foundation have poured resources into training business owners in how to sustain growth for the future. In June of 2009, the New Economy Initiative helped bring Kauffman's FastTrac program to the city without cost. Since then, FastTrac has worked with and graduated more than 1,200 entrepreneurs from an assortment of backgrounds.

Two FastTrac graduates include Austin Black and James Canning, longtime friends and Detroit natives who both started their own businesses this past year. After completing the course last year, Black encouraged Canning to enroll as a way to shore up the direction he wanted to take his new PR company. "As someone whose job it is to help people tell their stories, this class helped me to tell my own story," Canning says. Soon he learned strategies like how to develop his mission, create his competitive advantage, and attract new clients to the businesss.

FastTrac courses typically run 10 weeks and help entrepreneurs to carry out certain early business plan objectives. Bizdom U, by contrast, provides an intense, full-scale experience from the idea stage all the way to acquiring funding. Each year, twenty chosen entrepreneurs partake in a four-month regimen where they get feedback from consultants, a professional workspace to operate from, and help with business plan development. At the end participants are eligible to receive up to $100,000 in funding to invest in their businesses.

Bizdom U largely came out of the vision Dan Gilbert had for the city in 2006. By moving the Quicken Loans headquarters to downtown Detroit, Gilbert staked his faith in the future of the city. And, as Sanders points out, entrepreneurs have responded to the call. These aggressive, forward-thinking leaders, he says, will lay the groundwork for the city’s next generation of innovators.

3. A vibrant support network exists.

Though a diverse lot, Detroit entrepreneurs all seem to share one common trait: they want to see each other succeed. Owners of businesses large and small, across dozens of different industries, have united under this belief to help the city progress as a whole.

"You have this community in Detroit where entrepreneurs want other entrepreneurs to succeed because it brings more business and more people to the city," says Black, who started his own real estate company devoted to city living. Black's passion for Detroit and its success extends to his work with Detroit Synergy, a group he helped found to give people the resources they need to revitalize the city.

Detroit's collaborative and collective mindset is one of the primary catalysts for the creation of groups like Open City Detroit. Started by two women entrepreneurs, Open City invites its network of loosely connected business owners to share thoughts on how to run better businesses. "No one is competing here as much as they are trying to help one another through forums like Open City," says James Canning. Open City is just one of a number of similar resources such as Motor City Connect, Business Leaders for Michigan, and Fusion Detroit that aim to bring these enthused leaders together.

One such leader is Jonathan Citrin, the 34-year-old founder of the aptly titled financial services firm CitrinGroup. Citrin considers himself lucky that he was on the early end of the city’s entrepreneurial upswing – the firm started in 2003 and has doubled its revenue in the past 18 months alone. Now, after all his success, Citrin hopes to guide others along a similar path. "I made a ton of mistakes," he admits. "But had I had some of the support that’s here now, I know I would’ve done even better."

Part of helping others to do better involves mentoring other business owners and teaching part-time at Wayne State University's School of Business Administration. Citrin says he loves to talk with students and aspiring entrepreneurs about their projects, particularly Wayne State’s high-tech business park, TechTown. "I don’t know if they get enough credit, but Wayne has been a real bright spot in fostering entrepreneurship in town," he says.

Similar to SPARK, TechTown works with innovators from the university community to bring ideas into fruition. It hosts 70 high-tech, growing companies from its facility in the heart of midtown and has enrolled a host of entrepreneurs in Kauffman’s FastTrac program as well. While TechTown and SPARK and other accelerators operate independently, each has its own strengths. Rizik helps spawn capital for many of these accelerators and has seen increased communication between them in recent years. He says that "it’s only through the coordination and efforts between them that they can each be optimized."

4. There's access to space, leadership, and capital.

These three elements combine to make the Detroit landscape an untapped territory for starting business on the cheap.

Austin Black worked in the Detroit real estate market for nearly a decade before opening up his own shop specializing in urban communities. He says he's witnessed a lot of movement over the past five years into neighborhoods that had traditionally sparse residential populations. Lately, though, Midtown in particular has turned many of its vacant lots into mixed-use structures that combine storefronts and residences.

"You have a lot of landlords that really want to work with entrepreneurs and help them open businesses because of the benefit of storefront sales," Black says. This seamless "barrier of entry," he says, is what drives entrepreneurs to open businesses they are passionate about and fill a need for the city.

The hospitable disposition you get from the city trickles down from the its stable of strong, accessible leaders. James Canning says he doesn't have trouble getting meetings with some of the top CEOs in his industry, willing to lend a helping hand to those starting out. "The established leadership are looking for new ideas and next wave leaders to step up," he says. "Those that are taking the initiative to do so are being heard."

Named Crain Detroit Businesses' Newsmaker of the Year in 2009, Chris Rizik is certainly one of those leaders looking for the next big idea. He founded Renaissance Venture Capital Fund under the notion that Michigan was brimming with opportunities for investment. He cites that it has been a top-five region for research and development over the past few decades on both the corporate and university levels. Now it is his responsibility to convince investors of the state's potential for innovation and business development. And to a large extent, Rizik has been quite convincing.

"So far we've invested a certain amount in venture capital, and they've invested four times that amount in Michigan," Rizik says of the investors.

While funding from companies like Rizik's makes for a good start, investors aren't exactly throwing money around, especially for non-high-tech industries. Egner believes that the region's access to capital will grow even stronger once it has a more robust entrepreneurial ecosystem. "VCs will come here when they see something to invest in," he says. "We have to make sure the infrastructure is in place, so that companies that come here will stay here."

For now, Egner advocates freeing up capital for companies in the second stage of growth looking to reach the next level. He doesn't want to freeze capital for proven companies while earlier stage companies misallocate funds. He says that only once they align the right resources – the research, development, and communication – can they use capital to fortify growth.

5. Government support is plentiful.

Apart from all the independent accelerators out there, the government itself remains dedicated to small-business growth as well. Michael Finney of SPARK says that government cooperation has been vital to the growth of Ann Arbor's now-vibrant entrepreneurial community. "We have a very seamless voice to local and state government with respect to the needs of our entrepreneurs," he says. "And these governments respond very nicely to ensure they're not inhibiting the ability of the entrepreneur to be successful."

Organizations like the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation also serve as liaisons between business owners and the state. Bizdom U CEO Ross Sanders says his businesses have received assistance from the DEGC as well as support from the city government. Entrepreneurs from the program have presented their progress in front of City Council meetings and have even gotten pep talks from Detroit's mayor, Dave Bing. "The government is really recognizing need to foster entrepreneurship and to retain talent in Michigan to do so," Sanders says.

Grant programs such as the 21st Century Jobs Fund prove the state's commitment to aiding Michigan businesses. So far Michigan has committed close to $100 million to the 21st Century Jobs Fund, which aims to grow new industries in technology and alternative energy that will bring a diverse, robust economy to the state.

Ultimately the burden to change will fall in the hands of the entrepreneurs and their passions. The government, the leaders, and the community have given them the means to succeed. Now it will be up to them to make it happen.

Posted by kkowatch on October 08, 2010 at 09:57 AM | Comments (0)

Free UM Business Cards for Current SI Students

To help SI students represent themselves and represent SI in a variety of settings, and in response to student requests, we are offering SI students (MSI and Ph.D.) a set of 100 free business cards with the SI logo and block M, and personalized with individual student names etc. SI students assisted with the card design and the design has been approved by the University.


For those of you who ordered cards in a previous semester and still have plenty, please use the cards you have rather than order more. If you ordered last year and have used most of your cards, it’s fine to order again.

In order to keep the cost down and thus allow for providing free cards to all students who request them, we must order the cards in a single batch. Thus, only students who submit the request form by 3pm on Friday, October 15th will be included in the order. Don’t delay – get your order in soon!

We are not able to process individual or small group requests after the deadline. We will send TWO reminders after this email to help you meet the deadline.

You can access the request form via the SI intranet (login with your uniqname and kerberos password) at:
https://www.si.umich.edu/intranet/students/bus_cards.htm

Remember, submit your request by 3PM ON Friday, October 15th.

We will send an email to those who request the cards with details on when the cards will be ready and where to pick them up.

We hope you will enjoy using these cards at conferences, interviews, etc. as well as giving them to prospective students or professionals who may be able to refer students to our program or who may want to recruit SI students for internships or jobs.

Enjoy!

Veronica Falandino
Student Affairs Program Manager
School of Information
University of Michigan

Posted by kkowatch on October 07, 2010 at 05:31 PM | Comments (0)

Health Informatics Faculty Position Available at University of Michigan School of Information

Faculty Position Postings
2010-11 Faculty Search Assistant/Associate/Full Professor

Health Informatics
Rank: Associate/Full Professor

The School of Information at the University of Michigan seeks an outstanding faculty candidate at the Associate or Full Professor rank in the field of health informatics. We invite applications not only from researchers in traditional academic positions, but also from practitioners such as health care or informatics professionals. For this position, we aspire to recruit an accomplished researcher and intellectual leader who will initiate a vigorous research agenda and help to build our proposed new professional master's degree program in health informatics. Our program will adopt a broad approach that incorporates clinical, consumer, and public health informatics.

We are particularly interested in faculty candidates whose research interests complement our existing expertise in such areas as social computing, computer-supported cooperative work, human-computer interaction, incentive-centered design, social informatics, large-scale data analysis, and information seeking, sharing and use.

The University of Michigan's new two-year master's degree in health informatics will be offered jointly by the School of Public Health and the School of Information (pending approval). It will combine School of Information strengths with those of the School of Public Health in health care management, health policy, health behavior, health education, and epidemiology. A certificate option will make the program available to working professionals and to students enrolled in other U-M programs.

The mission of the School of Information, where this position will reside, is to connect people, information, and technology in more valuable ways. The School is home to a dynamic and vibrant research and teaching program, with 35 FTE faculty, 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. In partnership with other units, we recently launched an undergraduate informatics major. The School of Information is internationally recognized for its research strengths in social informatics, network analysis and text mining, human computer interaction, digital archives, cyberinfrastructure, digital preservation, and information seeking, sharing and use. More about the School, its vision, and its activities can be found at the School's website: si.umich.edu

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan has a long and distinguished history as one of the first public universities in the nation. It is one of only two public institutions consistently ranked among the nation's top ten universities. The University has one of the largest health care complexes in the world and one of the best library systems in the United States. With more than $1 billion in research expenditures annually, the University has the second largest research expenditure among all universities in the nation. The University has an annual budget of more than $1.4 billion and an endowment valued at more than $7.57 billion.

Qualifications:

* Recognized contributions as a scholar and expert in clinical, consumer, or public health informatics
* An excellent record of leadership in health informatics education and/or professional practice
* Successful record of sponsored research and ability to foster a collaborative research enterprise
* A strong commitment to teaching, interdisciplinary research, and cultural diversity


Review of applications will begin Nov. 1 and continue until the position is filled.

How to Apply:
Applicants should submit the following materials online:

* Cover letter
* Curriculum vita
* Statement of research
* Statement of teaching interests and experience
* Three representative publications
* Names of three references

The School of Information at the University of Michigan seeks outstanding faculty candidates also in the following areas:

* Digital Environments/Digital Humanities. Rank: assistant professor, tenure-track.
* Information in Organizations. Rank: assistant professor, tenure-track.
* Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Rank: open.

The School's mission is to connect people, information, and technology in more valuable ways. The School currently has 35 FTE faculty; 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. We have recently partnered with other units to launch a new undergraduate major in informatics as well. We encourage you to learn more about the School, its mission, and its activities at si.umich.edu.

Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2010 and continue until the positions are filled.

All candidates should have completed or be nearing completion of a Ph.D. in a relevant field, and be committed to working in an interdisciplinary, culturally diverse environment. To apply, please see the individual job descriptions.

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action educator and employer.

Posted by kkowatch on October 07, 2010 at 03:14 PM | Comments (0)

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) Faculty Position Available at University of Michigan School of Information

Faculty Position Postings
2010-11 Faculty Search Assistant/Associate/Full Professor

Human-Computer Interaction
Rank: Open

The School of Information at the University of Michigan seeks an outstanding tenure-track faculty candidate at any rank in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). For this position, we aspire to recruit a skilled researcher who will contribute to teaching, research, and intellectual leadership in HCI. While we encourage applications from all areas of HCI, we are particularly interested in candidates with experience teaching design courses and whose research interests are related to the design of interactive systems, encompassing areas such as design methods, design tools, new forms of interaction, or designing for novel application domains. Successful candidates will be passionate about interdisciplinary work and be prepared to join a large and diverse community of researchers in the areas of interactive and social computing, with dozens of faculty and graduate students spanning several departments across the university. For more information about School of Information research and activities related to HCI and social computing, see misc.si.umich.edu.

The mission of the School of Information, where this position will reside, is to connect people, information, and technology in more valuable ways. The School is home to a dynamic and vibrant research and teaching program, with 35 FTE faculty, 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. In partnership with other units, we recently launched an undergraduate informatics major. The School of Information is internationally recognized for its research strengths in social informatics, network analysis and text mining, human computer interaction, digital archives, cyberinfrastructure, digital preservation, and information seeking, sharing, and use. More about the School, its vision, and its activities can be found at the School's website: si.umich.edu

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan has a long and distinguished history as one of the first public universities in the nation. It is one of only two public institutions consistently ranked among the nation's top ten universities. The University has one of the largest health care complexes in the world and one of the best library systems in the United States. With more than $1 billion in research expenditures annually, the University has the second largest research expenditure among all universities in the nation. The University has an annual budget of more than $1.4 billion and an endowment valued at more than $7.57 billion.

Qualifications:

* A Ph.D. (or nearing completion) in an area such as human-centered computing, design, computer science, sociology, psychology, computer-supported cooperative work, communication studies, or related fields concerned with human-computer interaction
* Demonstrated potential for successful teaching at the undergraduate and graduate level
* Demonstrated potential for high scholarly impact
* A strong commitment to teaching, interdisciplinary research, and cultural diversity

Review of applications will begin Nov. 1 and continue until the position is filled.

How to Apply:
Applicants should submit the following materials online:

* Cover letter
* Curriculum vita
* Statement of research
* Statement of teaching interests and experience
* Three representative publications
* Three letters of reference (required for junior applicants) or names of three references (senior applicants)


The School of Information at the University of Michigan seeks outstanding faculty candidates also in the following areas:

* Digital Environments/Digital Humanities. Rank: assistant professor, tenure-track.
* Information in Organizations. Rank: assistant professor, tenure-track.
* Health Informatics. Rank: associate/full professor.

The School's mission is to connect people, information, and technology in more valuable ways. The School currently has 35 FTE faculty; 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. We have recently partnered with other units to launch a new undergraduate major in informatics as well. We encourage you to learn more about the School, its mission, and its activities at si.umich.edu.

Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2010 and continue until the positions are filled.

All candidates should have completed or be nearing completion of a Ph.D. in a relevant field, and be committed to working in an interdisciplinary, culturally diverse environment. To apply, please see the individual job descriptions.

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action educator and employer.

Posted by kkowatch on October 07, 2010 at 03:12 PM | Comments (0)

Information in Organizations Faculty Position Available at University of Michigan School of Information

Faculty Position Postings
2010-11 Faculty Search Assistant/Associate/Full Professor

Information in Organizations
Rank: Assistant Professor

The School of Information at the University of Michigan seeks an outstanding tenure-track faculty candidate at the Assistant Professor rank in the field of information in organizations. For this position, we aspire to recruit an accomplished researcher and intellectual leader focused on the role of information and information technology in organizations.

The University of Michigan hosts one of the strongest organizational research communities in the world, encompassing several hundred faculty and graduate students across more than a dozen departments, including the Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies. The School of Information (SI) both contributes to and draws upon this community. SI is home to a dynamic and vibrant research and teaching program, with 35 FTE faculty, 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. In partnership with other units, we recently launched a new undergraduate informatics major. The School of Information is internationally recognized for its research strengths in social informatics, information economics and management, network analysis and text mining, human computer interaction, digital archives, cyberinfrastructure, digital preservation, and information seeking, sharing and use. More about the School, its vision, and its activities can be found at the School's website: si.umich.edu

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan has a long and distinguished history as one of the first public universities in the nation. It is one of only two public institutions consistently ranked among the nation's top ten universities. The University has one of the largest health care complexes in the world and one of the best library systems in the United States. With more than $1 billion in research expenditures annually, the University has the second largest research expenditure among all universities in the nation. The University has an annual budget of more than $1.4 billion and an endowment valued at more than $7.57 billion.

Qualifications:

* A Ph.D. (or nearing completion) in a relevant area, such as organizational behavior, sociology, organizational psychology, computer-supported cooperative work, social informatics, management, business information technology, management information systems, communication studies, or related fields concerned with information in organizations
* Demonstrated potential for successful teaching at the undergraduate and graduate level
* Demonstrated potential for high scholarly impact
* A strong commitment to teaching, interdisciplinary research, and cultural diversity


Review of applications will begin Nov. 1 and continue until the position is filled.

How to Apply:
Applicants should submit the following materials online:

* Cover letter
* Curriculum vita
* Statement of research
* Statement of teaching interests and experience
* Three representative publications
* Three letters of reference

The School of Information at the University of Michigan seeks outstanding faculty candidates also in the following areas:

* Digital Environments/Digital Humanities. Rank: assistant professor, tenure-track.
* Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Rank: open.
* Health Informatics. Rank: associate/full professor.

The School's mission is to connect people, information, and technology in more valuable ways. The School currently has 35 FTE faculty; 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. We have recently partnered with other units to launch a new undergraduate major in informatics as well. We encourage you to learn more about the School, its mission, and its activities at si.umich.edu.

Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2010 and continue until the positions are filled.

All candidates should have completed or be nearing completion of a Ph.D. in a relevant field, and be committed to working in an interdisciplinary, culturally diverse environment. To apply, please see the individual job descriptions.

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action educator and employer.

Posted by kkowatch on October 07, 2010 at 03:07 PM | Comments (0)

Digital Environments/Digital Humanities Faculty Position Available at University of Michigan School of Information

Faculty Position Postings
2010-11 Faculty Search Assistant/Associate/Full Professor

Digital Environments/Digital Humanities
Rank: Assistant Professor

The University of Michigan's School of Information (SI) seeks an outstanding tenure-track faculty member at the Assistant Professor level to help establish a vigorous program of research and teaching in Digital Environments/Digital Humanities. New technologies and digital environments offer transformative opportunities for the humanities. At the same time, they bring unheralded challenges for accountability, authority, representation, intelligibility, and the assessment of value. Candidates for this position should have a demonstrated research record investigating topics of concern in the digital humanities. Potential areas of research include (but are not limited to) virtual collaboration in the humanities; design of interactive humanities-related media; credibility and authority of digital content; ethnography or history of digital culture; and curation of digital resources.

This position is part of a Digital Environments faculty cluster aimed at transforming humanities scholarship and engaging faculty and students in new modes of research, teaching, and learning. The Digital Environments cluster represents a partnership between the School of Information; the departments of English Language and Literature and Communication Studies; and the Program in American Culture, each of which is hiring a new faculty member through independent searches. Candidates for the School of Information position will engage with these new faculty as well as colleagues across the university, through such venues as research projects, a speaker series, reading groups, and teaching initiatives.

Application letters for this position must discuss the candidate's ideas for interacting with the cluster group. Before doing so, please read the full description of the Digital Environments cluster.

The mission of the School of Information, where this position will reside, is to connect people, information, and technology in more valuable ways. The School is home to a dynamic and vibrant research and teaching program, with 35 FTE faculty, 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. In partnership with other units, we recently launched a new undergraduate informatics major. The School of Information is internationally recognized for its research strengths in social informatics, network analysis and text mining, human computer interaction, digital archives, cyberinfrastructure, digital preservation, and information seeking, sharing and use. More about the School, its vision, and its activities can be found at the School's website: si.umich.edu

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan has a long and distinguished history as one of the first public universities in the nation. It is one of only two public institutions consistently ranked among the nation's top ten universities. The University has one of the largest health care complexes in the world and one of the best library systems in the United States. With more than $1 billion in research expenditures annually, the University has the second largest research expenditure among all universities in the nation. The University has an annual budget of more than $1.4 billion and an endowment valued at more than $7.57 billion.

Qualifications:

* Ph.D. (or nearing completion) in a relevant area, such as literature, history, cultural studies, cultural anthropology, archaeology, communication studies, design, information science, library science, archival studies, or technical fields involving significant interactions with the humanities
* Demonstrated potential for successful teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels
* Demonstrated potential for high scholarly impact
* A strong commitment to teaching, interdisciplinary research, creative activity, and cultural diversity

Review of applications will begin Nov. 1 and continue until the position is filled.

How to Apply:
Applicants should submit the following materials online:

* Cover letter, including your ideas for interacting with the Digital Environments cluster group
* Curriculum vita
* Statement of research
* Statement of teaching interests and experience
* Three representative publications
* Three letters of reference

The School of Information at the University of Michigan seeks outstanding faculty candidates also in the following areas:

* Information in Organizations. Rank: assistant professor, tenure-track.
* Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Rank: open.
* Health Informatics. Rank: associate/full professor.

The School's mission is to connect people, information, and technology in more valuable ways. The School currently has 35 FTE faculty; 49 doctoral students, and 380 students in its professional program, the Master of Science in Information. We have recently partnered with other units to launch a new undergraduate major in informatics as well. We encourage you to learn more about the School, its mission, and its activities at si.umich.edu.

Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2010 and continue until the positions are filled.

All candidates should have completed or be nearing completion of a Ph.D. in a relevant field, and be committed to working in an interdisciplinary, culturally diverse environment. To apply, please see the individual job descriptions.

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action educator and employer.

Posted by kkowatch on October 07, 2010 at 03:00 PM | Comments (0)

UM International Career Pathways Series Events This Week

If you are interested in international career opportunities, check out these two UM International Career Pathways Series this week!

Careers and Internships in US Government Foreign Affairs - Tuesday
Marketing Your International Experience Workshop - Thursday

Careers and Internships in US Government Foreign Affairs
Tuesday October 5
6:00-7:00 PM
1120 Weill Hall (Ford School Building)

Interested in a career formulating, representing, or implementing US foreign policy?

This panel features UM's Diplomat-in-Residence, Michael McClellan along with Prof. John Ciorciari from the Ford School (and former Treasury official), Ambassador Melvyn Levitsky from the Ford School (retired Ambassador to Brazil and Bulgaria), Lin Jones (master’s student who did an internship in Beijing with the US Trade Rep), and Mayela Montenegro (master’s student, who did State Dept internship in Zimbabwe). They will talk about the foreign and civil service opportunities within the State Department and other federal agencies. Please note that US government agencies require U.S. citizenship.

State Department internships are open to undergraduates (all majors) who will have completed their sophomore year by the time they go (current sophomores may apply) as well as graduate students in all disciplines. Students must return to their studies after the internship. For more information, see the International Center’s article at: http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt/work/options/usgovt.html

Application deadline for State Department summer internships is November 1—apply online at: http://www.careers.state.gov/students/programs.html#SIP


________________________________________
Marketing Your International Experience Workshop
Thursday October 7
4:30-6:00 PM
Johnson Room in the Lurie Engineering Center (North Campus)
Location--http://www.engin.umich.edu/facilities/maps/luriecenter.html

How do you maximize your international experience when talking to employers? When they ask about your time abroad, is 'It was awesome!' all you can say??
Develop strategies and techniques in this interactive workshop to help you successfully market your study, work, internship or volunteer abroad skills and experience to employers.

Presenters are from the LSA Center for Global and Intercultural Study (CGIS), International Programs in Engineering (IPE), and the Engineering Career Resource Center (ECRC)

These programs are UM International Career Pathways events.

Posted by kkowatch on October 04, 2010 at 03:47 PM | Comments (0)

Job Search and Recruiting Tips from an UMSI Alum

Every now and then, we'll get some words of advice from an alumnus who is out in the field. I always ask if we can share this, and of course, they always agree as they want their knowledge and experience and tips shared to help everyone. See below for some tips that this alumnus thought would be helpful based on several conversations that have been had with SI students over the past few years:

1. Female students don't seem to be familiar with the Grace Hopper Conference going on right now in Atlanta. From previous students I've heard that it was a very important place to make connections and I know a few people that actually got jobs from there.

2. Conferences in general don't seem to be high on students' list of priorities. There is usually a way to attend for a reduced price or for free through volunteer or stipend opportunities and that students should explore these options so that they can attend conferences, which are usually a great networking opportunity.

3. Almost every student that I've talked to indicated to be interested in developing for mobile devices. This is great, but I want to make sure that they are aware that they will be joining a pool of already very talented people when they come fresh from college. Being familiar with design for mobile is expected, but it does not mean they will be working on iphone/android/ipad apps all day right from the start. I think it's important to know that having worked on a mobile app for a class project and owning an iphone (yes, I had this comment) will not be enough. I also want to make sure that students don't specialize themselves too much for the job world by focusing on mobile design, since there is already a very big group of people working on these products and the experience of a 2-year grad program won't prepare them enough for this niche. They need to make sure to also have some presentable work for "web" projects.

4. Quite a few people are still undecided about research versus interaction design which I understand but at large internet companies like Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, and Apple, these positions rarely overlap. Students need to know the difference and pursue opportunities that will provide them with the relevant experience for these separate, but related fields. Check out these links to get a general idea of the differences:
User Experience Research
User Experience Design
Interaction Design

I also think that students mix up the role of a UX designer with a specific job description. Most of the times UX design is the practice within a company that has a UX department along with engineering and project management. User Researcher and Interaction Designers can both be User Experience Designers.

5. When students talk to employers they should make sure to at least know one or a few products from that employer. Even if it's just to start a conversation. I am pretty surprised that many students did not know anything about what we do at my company, one of the largest internet firms in the world. I also had a student respond "I'm not that big of a fan of {your company}", which is not the best statement in any situation of job searching.

Posted by kkowatch on October 04, 2010 at 10:50 AM | Comments (0)

ARMA Detroit: Six Starting Points for a Records Management Rookie

Six Starting Points for a Records Management Rookie

Date: October 13, 2010
Time: 5:00 - 7:30 p.m.

Speaker(s): Richard E Smith, CRM, Express Scripts Inc.

Few choose records management as a career; most are assigned to this job while doing something else. Inevitably, they ask the same question that has been asked by thousands before them: “Where should a rookie like me start?” This session offers six starting points that most professionals follow to be successful in leading a records and information management effort for their organizations.

Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:
1. Outline six strategic objectives for rookies to follow for getting started
2. Identify resources available to simplify getting started
3. Identify the most common rookie mistakes and techniques to recognize and avoid them

Go to http://www.armadetroit.org/pages/meetingsevents.html?dis=detail&ID=75 for more information and register;

Posted by kkowatch on October 04, 2010 at 08:57 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 4, 2010

In this Edition:
Mock Interviews @SI
Internship Presentations
Other Career Events on Campus
Did You Know?
Workshops/Programs
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Mock Interviews @SI - Sign-up NOW!
Ann Arbor District Library
Wednesday, October 20
1:00-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad

UM Kresge Business Administration Library
Friday, October 22
Thursday, November 18
1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad

Note: If the organization or positions offered aren’t exactly what you are targeting, that’s okay – sign up for something close anyway! The feedback you’ll receive will be helpful for your job search no matter what.

Please login to iTrack in order to sign up for a Mock Interview Slot! We will be offering more mock interview schedules throughout the year. Watch for publicity!

Internship Presentations
SOCHI Internship Presentations (Sponsored by: SOCHI)
Monday, October 4
7:00-9:30 p.m.
2255 North Quad

ALA Internship Presentations (Sponsored by: ALA)
Tuesday, October 5
Wednesday, October 6
11:30-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Learn about all of the amazing internships SI students obtain. Second year SI student panelists will present on their summer internship experiences. Panels will be career/industry-specific. This is a wonderful opportunity to explore the type of internship you would like to obtain for next summer.

Other Career Events on Campus
Career in US Foreign Affairs
Tuesday, October 5
6:00-7:00 p.m.
1120 Weill Hall

Marketing Your International Experience to Employers
Thursday, October 7
4:30-6:00 p.m.
Lurie Engineering Center, Johnson Room (North Campus)

30-Minute Mentors
Friday, October 22
11:00-5:00 p.m.
UM Alumni Center

Got 30 Minutes? Get a Michigan Mentor. Talk one-on-one with successful Michigan alumni in a variety of career fields. Register at www.umalumni.com/students.

Did You Know?
Welcome Wednesdays
8 a.m.-Noon
UM Alumni Center

Stop by the Alumni Center for free bagels and coffee and enjoy comfortable chairs, free WiFi and TV!

Workshops/Programs
Introduction to ePortfolios
Tuesday, October 5
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 North Quad

Learn what an ePortfolio is, how to develop one, how to use it, and what and what not to include in your own. Examples of real portfolios will be shown.

How to Network with SI Alumni
Friday, October 8
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 North Quad

SI Alumni are an excellent resource for networking for success in your internship and job search. In this workshop, tips and resources will be shared on how to make the most of the SI Student-Alumni Network, LinkedIn Groups, and other UM resources and events that provide connections to alumni. This workshop will help prepare you for the Speed Networking with the SI Alumni Board the following week!

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Joanna Kroll (jckroll@umich.edu)
Tuesday, October 5 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. - 3360 North Quad

Kelly Kowatch (kkowatch@umich.edu)
Tuesday, October 5 from 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. - 3360 North Quad
Friday, October 8 from 10:30 – 11:30 am - SI Student Lounge, North Quad

Emily Bowman Appointment/Walk-In Hours
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Wednesday, October 6 from Noon to 2:00 p.m. - 3360 North Quad
Friday, October 8 from Noon to 1:30pm – 3360 North Quad

Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on October 04, 2010 at 08:36 AM | Comments (0)