Do You Have a "Sampler Platter" of Skills?

Interested in content marketing? Kinvey's VP of Marketing, Joe Chernov, describes the "sampler platter" of skills you'll need to be successful with SoftwareAdvice.com's Lauren Carlson.

WATCH VIDEO

Posted by kgdunn on January 17, 2013 at 03:38 PM | Comments (0)

ePortfolio Employer Tips

The UMSI Career Development Office recently hosted a Portfolio Review Panel where several students shared their online portfolios and received employer feedback. Here's what the employers had to say!

As the panelists from ForeSee, TechSmith and Seelio shared their thoughts, the main message I heard was that exhibiting your passion and motivation throughout your portfolio is key to setting yourself apart.

For those of you that were unable to attend, you can be sure I took fast and furious notes to share with you all!

Form/Function
-If you use a pre-built platform (e.g., Seelio or Behabce) you won’t be judged on the portfolio design. If you custom build it, the design will be judged. If you use a publishing platform tool such as Wordpress, choose a tasteful template that won't take away from your content.
-When working on the design and layout keep in mind your ePortfolio may be projected onto a large screen, viewed on a mobile device, or printed out.
-Portfolios should still be optimized for Internet Explorer usage.
-Apply what you’ve learned in courses regarding usability best practices.
-Make navigation easy and simple to understand.
-Give your reader direction or tips for where to look and where to go. You can use a hub and spokes layout or include arrows or hints where to go next.
-Use bullet points over paragraphs of text.
-Using image thumbnails is great, but be sure to link to the full-size image.

Content
-Be sure to prioritize the projects highlighted on your portfolio.
-Your experience should be front and center – employers want to be intrigued by WHAT you’ve done, before learning more about you as a person and how you’d fit into their team.
-If you’ve done personal projects put them up front! These show your initiative and will help set you apart.
-Use teaser text to give projects context before clicking through to the full explanation.
-Be honest about what your role on each project was – they’ll be able to tell if you’re lying.
-It’s important to show you can play multiple roles within teams.
-Lower the barriers for getting in touch with you. No recruiter is going to fill out a “contact me” form – make it easy for them to find your phone number and email address.

Upcoming ePortfolio Sessions
-SOIAR and SOCHI are holding a Wordpress Workshop Wednesday, October 24, at noon-1 p.m. in 1255 North Quad. More information can be found at https://www.facebook.com/events/482108235155048/.
-Join the CDO for “Developing Your ePortfolio,” on Tuesday, Oct. 30 noon-1:30 p.m. in 2185 North Quad. For more information and to RSVP, login to iTrack at http://www.si.umich.edu/careers/itrack.
-If you’d like to receive feedback on your ePortfolio, make an appointment to meet with the CDO staff at http://www.si.umich.edu/careers/career-development-office.


Posted by kgdunn on October 19, 2012 at 01:34 PM | Comments (0)

Create your pitch in 5 minutes or less

Use this free, step by step tool to develop an effective pitch. No elevator required!

http://www.15secondpitch.com/new/

Posted by jckroll on November 01, 2011 at 02:27 PM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 24, 2011

In This Edition:
Workshops and programs
Employers @SI
Mock Interviews @SI
Other events on campus

Workshops and programs
How to network with SI alumni
Tuesday, October 25
Noon - 1:00 pm
2185 North Quad

SI Alumni are an excellent resource for networking for success in your internship and job search. In this workshop, tips and resources will be shared on how to make the most of the SI Student-Alumni Network, LinkedIn Groups, and other UM resources and events that provide connections to alumni.

Social Computing - What can you do with an MSI?
Career exploration information session

Thursday, October 27
Noon - 1:00 pm
2185 North Quad

In this session, the Social Computing specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

RSVP in iTrack to attend!

Employers @SI
Access Sciences Information Session
Monday, October 24
Noon - 1:00 pm
2245 North Quad

Interviews
Monday, October 24
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
3360 North Quad
Schedule closed

Marketing Associates Information Session
Tuesday, October 25
Noon - 1:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

RSVP in iTrack to attend!

Mock Interviews @SI
Cengage Learning
Monday, October 24
8:15 am - 4:15 pm
User Experience Specialist (schedule full)
Schedule closed

Ithaka
Friday, November 4
9:00 am - Noon
User Experience Specialist
Schedule closes Wednesday, November 2 at 11:59 pm

Note: If the organization or positions offered aren't exactly what you are targeting, that's okay - sign up for something close anyway! The feedback you'll receive will be helpful for your job search no matter what.

Please login to iTrack in order to sign up for a Mock Interview Slot!

We will be offering more mock interview schedules throughout the year. Watch for publicity!

RSVP in iTrack to attend!

Other Events on Campus
Statement of purpose writing workshop (for International Funding)

Digital Preservation internships information session

CNA information session

More information available on the iTrack Calendar of Events!

Posted by shamille on October 21, 2011 at 02:53 PM | Comments (0)

Check out the Top 25 Companies for Career Opportunities

Glassdoor.com announces the Top 25 Companies for Career Opportunities

Employees have reported how their companies rate for career opportunities – find out which 25 companies provide the best career opportunities.
http://www.glassdoor.com/Top-Companies-for-Career-Opportunities-LST_KQ0,38.htm?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=topco-ne-link&utm_campaign=topco-ne

Posted by jckroll on September 30, 2011 at 03:46 PM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 3, 2011

In This Edition:
Workshops and programs
Employers @SI
Mock interviews @SI
RSVP for upcoming events
Other events on campus

Workshops and programs
Resume Writing Workshop
Tuesday, October 4
Noon - 1:00 pm
2245 North Quad

In this hands-on workshop, learn how to write and utilize a well-written and formatted resume. The main components of a resume will be included, including tips on how to tailor a resume and make it catch the eye of an employer. Please bring your own resume.

Find your federal dream job or internship
Federal webinar series: Part one

Tuesday, October 4
5:00 - 6:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

Interested in successfully finding and applying for federal internships and full-time jobs? If so, we are offering a 3-part Federal Job/Internship Series to help you reach that goal!

Part one: During this webinar, we'll share best practices for federal jobseekers including where to look for government positions, how to determine which ones are a good fit for various backgrounds and skill sets, and tips for analyzing job opportunity announcements. RSVP in iTrack to attend!

Information Analysis and Retrieval - What can you do with an MSI? Career exploration information session
Thursday, October 6
Noon - 1:00 pm
2185 North Quad

In this session, the Information Analysis and Retrieval specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

International Internships & Careers
Thursday, October 6
5:00 - 7:00 pm
2435 North Quad

Come learn about the wide range of international careers that are associated with the field of Information. The information industry is rapidly growing and encompasses careers from international development to consulting to librarianship to web design and usability. Panelists will include those with experience in internationally-oriented librarianship, international development, technology and research, and more.

Employers @SI
3CSI
Interviews
Wednesday, October 5
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Monday, October 3 at 11:59 pm

Vectorform
Information Session
Tuesday, October 11
Noon - 1:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

Interviews
Tuesday, October 11
1:30 - 5:00 pm
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Thursday, October 6 at 11:59 pm

Access Sciences
Information Session
Monday, October 24
Noon - 1:00 pm
2245 North Quad

Interviews
Monday, October 24
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Thursday, October 20 at 11:59 pm

Mock interviews @SI
Eastern Michigan University Library
Friday, October 7
9:00 am - Noon
Processing Archivist and University Archivist (3 slots available)
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 5 at 11:59 pm

Cengage Learning
Monday, October 24
8:15 am - 4:15 pm
User Experience Specialist (schedule full)
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 19 at 11:59 pm

Note: If the organization or positions offered aren't exactly what you are targeting, that's okay - sign up for something close anyway! The feedback you'll receive will be helpful for your job search no matter what.

Please login to iTrack in order to sign up for a Mock Interview Slot!

We will be offering more mock interview schedules throughout the year. Watch for publicity!

RSVP for upcoming events
Cover Letter Writing Workshop
Wednesday, October 12
Noon - 1:00 pm
2185 North Quad

In this hands-on workshop, learn how to write and utilize a well-written and formatted cover letter. The main components of a cover letter will be included, including tips on how to tailor a cover letter and make it catch the eye of an employer.

<>emApply for the position that's right for you
Federal webinar series: Part one
Wednesday, October 12
3:00 - 4:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

Interested in successfully finding and applying for federal internships and full-time jobs? If so, we are offering a 3-part Federal Job/Internship Series to help you reach that goal!

Part two: In the second segment of this series, we'll walk students and jobseekers through the federal application process. From building a federal resume to filling out questionnaires to using the Application Manager on USAJOBS.gov, we'll break down the steps individuals need to take to complete and submit an application.

Resume Panel Workshop
Friday, October 14
Noon - 1:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

Ever wonder what happens after you've spent all that time posting your resume to every major on-line job board or to dozens of company web sites? Do actual human beings ever see it? Do you feel like it goes off into a perceived 'black hole' never to be seen again? We have information that will guarantee your resume gets noticed on-line! A panel of resume experts from various departments on campus will provide advice/tips on how to create an effective resume for any industry.

Other events on campus
Funding for Internships and Research Abroad

Idealist Grad Fair

Fall Career Expo

Careers and Internships with German companies

More information available on the iTrack calendar of events

Posted by shamille on September 30, 2011 at 03:14 PM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, September 19, 2011

In This Edition:
Announcements
Workshops and programs
Employers @SI
Mock Interviews @SI
RSVP for upcoming events
Did you know?
Other events on campus

Announcements
We are happy to announce that Katy Ross has joined the Career Development team! Many of you know Katy from her role in recruiting at SI. She is now transitioning into a new role at the school which will consist of her providing career and internship search advising with first year students, as well as helping to coordinate Alternative Spring Break while Kelly Kowatch is out on maternity leave.

Katy will start offering resume reviews and internship advising appointments soon. Watch for that announcement, and make an appointment to see her in the coming weeks by emailing katross@umich.edu.

***
Just a reminder that for MSI students who have secured an internship for Fall 2011 and would like to receive credit for the experience, the deadline to request credit is Friday, September 30. Students can read more about gaining academic credit for their Internship experience at this link and also submit their request for credit. Note that first term MSI students are not eligible to receive credit for internships.

Workshops and Programs
Resume review walk-in hours
Monday, September 19
3:00 - 4:00 pm

Wednesday, September 21
10:30-11:30 am

Thursday, September 22
3:00 - 4:00 pm
3360 North Quad (all sessions)

Whether you have just updated your resume and want a quick review or need to have your resume reviewed for the first time, this is a great opportunity to get some quick feedback on your professional resume and to get you thinking about your internship or job search.

International Internship Search Panel
Tuesday, September 20
Noon - 1:00 pm
2185 North Quad

Interested in an international internship for your summer PEP intern experience? Hear from second-year students who participated in an internship abroad during 2011. Panelists will share information on how they found their internship, funding opportunities, and what they did. Please come with questions!

SI 681 Career Development Seminar
Wednesday, September 21
Thursday, September 22
Monday, September 26
Noon - 2:00 pm
2435 North Quad

All students who receive Fall 2011 SI 681 PEP credits are required to attend to attend a SI 681 Career Development Seminar.

You do not need to prepare for your seminar attendance except to print out your reflections from the ePortfolio system (not the public portfolio) and read them over before you come. Be prepared to discuss your reflections. Refreshments and snacks will be served.

Due to the large number of students who participated in internships this past summer and the extreme time commitment that it takes to coordinate and attend the presentations for the SI-CDO, we decided to instead have students create LinkedIn profiles and develop a single slide that you will add to your public portfolio. The details of these two requirements will be outlined in the seminar.

Information Policy - What can you do with an MSI?
Career exploration information session

Friday, September 23
Noon - 1:00 pm
2185 North Quad

In this career exploration information session on what you can do with an MSI, the Information Policy specialization will be introduced and examined, and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Employers @SI
Compuware
Information Session
Tuesday, September 20
Noon - 1:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

Interviews
Tuesday, September 20
9:00 - 3:00 pm
3360 North Quad
Schedule closed

Sapient
Information Session
Tuesday, September 27
5:30 - 7:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

Interviews
Wednesday, September 28
9:00 - 5:00 pm
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Wednesday, September 21 at 11:59 pm

Mock Interviews @SI
Cengage Learning
Monday, October 24
8:15 am - 4:15 pm
User Experience Specialist (2 slots available)
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 19 at 11:59 pm

Note: If the organization or positions offered aren't exactly what you are targeting, that's okay - sign up for something close anyway! The feedback you'll receive will be helpful for your job search no matter what.

Please login to iTrack in order to sign up for a Mock Interview Slot!

We will be offering more mock interview schedules throughout the year. Watch for publicity!

RSVP for upcoming events
Getting started (or at least thinking about) your job search
Wednesday, September 28
Noon - 1:00 pm
2245 North Quad

Don't worry, you don't need to start sending out your resume today. Just come hear about all of the resources you have available to help you in your job search and recommended timelines. Learn about the top three most effective job search methods for SI graduates in this session on "Getting Started (or at Least Thinking About) Your Job Search."

ePortfolio panel
Thursday, September 29
Noon - 1:00 pm
Ehrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad

Join local employers and recruiters in this interactive panel experience. Panelists will publicly review and critique current SI students' online portfolios. A must-attend event for anyone who has an ePortfolio or plans to develop one.

Did you know?
Did you know that the CDO has a start of the art interview room that offers students and employers the opportunity to participate in Skype or video conference interviews?

Contact si.careers@umich.edu to schedule a Skype interview for your job or internship search as they come up.

Other events on campus
U.S. State Department Foreign Service Exam Information Session

Law Day

Lunch and Learn with McKinsey & Company

McKinsey & Company Information Session

Engineering Career Fair

More information available on the iTrack Calendar of Events

Posted by shamille on September 19, 2011 at 11:47 AM | Comments (0)

User Experience Career Guide

A cool infograph by Onward Search that offers a breadth of highlights of some interesting data points if you are exploring the user experience field (market, job titles, salaries, and more). This could be a fairly good resource for exploring just some of the options for this career field.

http://www.onwardsearch.com/careers/user-experience-careers-guide/

Posted by jckroll on September 09, 2011 at 03:09 PM | Comments (0)

Interested in Web Analytics? Opportunities for NPOs, Students, or Professionals as Mentors

A current student shared with the SI-CDO office a very interested resource for students and alumni interested in getting more involved with web analytics. This is also a free resources for non-profits to get free web analytics consulting performed.

The Analysis Exchange is an effort to dramatically increase the number of people on Earth doing web analytics the right way. By connecting great causes with experienced mentors and motivated students, The Analysis Exchange is creating an entirely new way to teach digital measurement best practices.

Causes gain access to a global network of free web analytics resources, mentors contribute to the growth of the entire industry, and students gain experience mining data for actionable, analytics-driven business insights.

What is the Analysis Exchange?

The Analysis Exchange is an effort designed to provide hands-on training opportunities for aspiring web analytics professionals while providing free web data analysis to the entire nonprofit community. The effort works by connecting organizations, mentors, and student participants:

Organizations include nonprofits, and non-governmental organizations who rarely benefit materially from web analytics but have a tremendous opportunity for optimization;

Students are motivated and intelligent individuals who are looking for hands-on experience with web analytics systems and real business questions;

Mentors come from the community of analytics experts willing to pledge their time to help nonprofits and students around the world, all for the sake of Analysis Exchange!

Projects are designed to be completed in around three weeks. Nonprofits and mentors will spend fewer than five hours on each project. The Analysis Exchange is 100 percent free for everyone!

Posted by kkowatch on June 29, 2011 at 02:18 PM | Comments (0)

Quicken Loans launches Twitter account

Quicken Loans recently launched a Twitter site for Quicken Loans Careers, http://www.twitter.com/QLCareers and we would like you to spread the word!

This is a great way for us to connect and network with various students interested in a career with Quicken Loans.

The goal is to have our Twitter account service as a means of 2 way communication. We will tweet out new career positions and job-search related content, but we will also respond to each and every student who has an inquiry or comment.

Posted by shamille on June 09, 2011 at 02:36 PM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, April 11, 2011

In This Edition:
Workshops/Programs
Other Events on Campus
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Workshops/Programs
A Day in the Life of a... K-12 Media Specialist
Tuesday, April 12
4:00-5:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

Attend this panel session to learn about what is takes to get a job as a K12 School Media Specialist. A panel of K12 School Media professionals will provide an overview of what they do, how they got their jobs, critical skills required, employment outlook, and anything else you want to know about their career paths and/or about the field in general.

Other Events on Campus
Education Job Fair (Sponsored by the U-M Career Center)
Thursday, April 14
9:30-2:00 p.m.
Michigan Union (register on-site)

There are over 50 schools participating in the Fair this year. This is a great opportunity to network with schools to talk about your career aspirations, skills and talents in person! You will likely discover job opportunities that you didn’t know were available. Check it out—even if just for a short time!

For a complete listing of the participating schools, check out the Career Center’s web site http://www.careercenter.umich.edu/students/events/edfair.html. You will also find tips and advice for preparing and navigating the fair as well.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu.

Wednesday, April 13 from 2 to 4
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on April 11, 2011 at 09:16 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, April 4, 2011

In This Edition:
Workshops/Programs
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Other Events on Campus
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Workshops/Programs
What Can You Do With a MSI?
Career Exploration Series: Information Management

Tuesday, April 5
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

In this session, a range of careers in Information Management will be introduced. This workshop will help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Silliman University Summer Opportunities - Philippines Information Session
Wednesday, April 6
11:30-12:30 p.m.
1270 North Quad

The SI CDO will host Virginia Rezmierski to talk about Silliman University and summer opportunities.

INTERNATIONAL SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES in Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental, Philippines

Silliman University is one of the best known and respected institutions of higher education in the Philippines. It is located in the southern Visayas, the central island cluster of the Philippines. Silliman University has a rich history as a Christian founded university. Taken over during WWII by the Japanese and used as a garrison, it also has deep history associated with that war.

Students who are selected to participate in these opportunities are eligible to apply for international internship funding through the SI Career Development Office.

If you plan to attend, please email Kelly Kowatch at kkowatch@umich.edu.

PEP Rally: Practical Engagement Program Information Session
Friday, April 8
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

All first year students are REQUIRED to attend a Practical Engagement Program (PEP) information session if you intend on receiving academic credit for a Summer or Fall internship. Learn how to obtain your 8 PEP credits (required to graduate). Find out about the Practical Engagement Program requirements, registration process, including the CPT process for international students, in order to be eligible to receive academic credit for your upcoming internships.

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Apr 12 K12 School Media Panel Session

Other Events on Campus
Hire Big 10 Plus|Virtual Career Fair
Tuesday, April 5 - Thursday, April 7

Students and Alumni are invited to attend the Virtual Career Fair, a unique virtual event that helps job seekers meet employers in an efficient, environmentally-conscious way.

Register at www.hirebig10.careereco.net

Did You Know?
The Student-Alumni Network (accessible via iTrack) has almost 200 SI alumni that students can reach out to get answers to questions about courses, internship and employment opportunities, interviewing tips, and resume questions?

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu.

Monday, April 4 from Noon to 5
Wednesday, April 6 from 2 to 3
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on April 04, 2011 at 09:21 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, March 21, 2011

In This Edition:
Employers @Si
Workshops/Programs
On-Campus Recruiting @SI
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Other Events on Campus
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Employers @SI
Blackbaud Information Session
Monday, March 28
5:00-6:00 p.m.
2185 North Quad

Cataphora Information Session
Monday, March 28
6:00-7:00 p.m.
2185 North Quad

Workshops/Programs
What Can You Do With a MSI?
Career Exploration Series: Information Management

Thursday, March 24
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

In this session, the Information Mangement specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

On the Road to Kenya: U-M Librarians Making a Difference
Friday, March 25
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Come hear U of M librarians Charles Ransom and Loyd Mbabu share their experiences leading a Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates (GIEU) program. Chuck and Loyd will be taking a dozen Michigan students to Kenya to teach Bishop Lawi Imathiu Secondary School faculty and students how to use the internet to aid in teaching and learning this summer. This is an excellent example of the non-traditional roles academic librarians are playing today.

Please RSVP to attend at http://bit.ly/kenyatalk.

On-Campus Recruiting @SI
Blackbaud Interviews (Candidates pre-selected)
Tuesday, March 29
8:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad

Microsoft Interviews (Candidates pre-selected)
Tuesday, March 29
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Mar 28 Networking Fair / expoSItion
Mar 31 The Art of Negotiation
Apr 1 Internship Orientation

Other Events on Campus
Global Information Week 2011
Monday, March 21 - Friday, March 25

Global Information Week provides events and a venue for students to reflect on globalization and its effect on their lives. All are welcome!

Visit http://www.lib.umich.edu/events/global-information-week-2011 for details on all events!

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Monday, March 21 from 3 to 5
Tuesday, March 22 from 1 to 2:30
Wednesday, March 23 from 2 to 5
Friday, March 25 from 1:30 to 4
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on March 21, 2011 at 01:33 PM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, March 14, 2011

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
Mock Interviews @SI
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Other Events on Campus
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Workshops/Programs
PEP Rally: Practical Engagement Program Information Session
Thursday, March 17
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

All first year students are REQUIRED to attend a Practical Engagement Program (PEP) information session if you intend on receiving academic credit for a Summer or Fall internship. Learn how to obtain your 8 PEP credits (required to graduate). Find out about the Practical Engagement Program requirements, registration process, including the CPT process for international students, in order to be eligible to receive academic credit for your upcoming internships.

Note: This is the last session of the term.

Mock Interviews @SI
Visteon
Friday, March 18
3360 North Quad
Schedule FULL

RSVP for Upcoming Events
What Can You Do With a MSI?
Career Exploration Series: Information Management

Thursday, March 24
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

In this session, the Information Management specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Other Events on Campus
Global Grads Fair: Information for Travel, Internships, and Research Abroad
Friday, March 18
10:00am-3:00pm
Rackham Graduate School, 4th floor

If you are planning to travel for academic purposes, this event is meant for you! There will be sessions on what to do before you leave, being a positive U-M ambassador, and the ethics of research abroad. There will also be a multi-booth Information Fair, as well as regional travel panels where you can interact with peers and professionals who have traveled to specific areas and have advice and insights to share. This event is open to all graduate students.

On the Road to Kenya: U-M Librarians Making a Difference
Friday, March 25
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Come hear U of M librarians Charles Ransom and Loyd Mbabu share their experiences leading a Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates (GIEU) program. Chuck and Loyd will be taking a dozen Michigan students to Kenya to teach Bishop Lawi Imathiu Secondary School faculty and students how to use the internet to aid in teaching and learning this summer. This is an excellent example of the non-traditional roles academic librarians are playing today.

Please RSVP to attend at http://bit.ly/kenyatalk.

Did You Know?
Did you know that the exposition is only 2 weeks away? We still have a few spots available so don’t miss out on your chance to win big cash prizes! The deadline to register your project is 3/21. Register online at http://www.si.umich.edu/stulife/expo-register.htm!

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Monday, March 14 from 12:30 to 5
Wednesday, March 16 from 2 to 5
Friday, March 18 from 2 to 5
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on March 14, 2011 at 09:18 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, March 7, 2011

In this Edition
Mock Interviews @SI
ASB Events
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know

Mock Interviews
Visteon
Friday, March 18
9:00-3:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule FULL

Practice and hone your interview skills by participating in a mock interview at SI. This is a valuable opportunity to practice with a real employer who is volunteering their time to support SI students in the professional development. Sign up for an interview in iTrack by March 16!

YOU MUST HAVE AN APPROVED RESUME in iTrack to be able to schedule an interview.

ASB Events
SI Post-ASB Reflection Session
All 2011 ASB participants are invited to share about their experiences at this post-reflective session. Come learn about what everyone else did while they were on ASB or share your own story!

Tuesday, March 8
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Wednesday, March 9
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

RSVP in iTrack to attend!

RSVP for Upcoming Events
PEP Rally: Practical Engagement Program Information Session
Thursday, March 17
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

All first year students are REQUIRED to attend a Practical Engagement Program (PEP) information session if you intend on receiving academic credit for a Summer or Fall internship. Learn how to obtain your 8 PEP credits (required to graduate). Find out about the Practical Engagement Program requirements, registration process, including the CPT process for international students, in order to be eligible to receive academic credit for your upcoming internships.

RSVP for all workshops in iTrack to attend!

Did You Know
Did you know that SI hosts a Networking Fair to connect with you employers? Stop by the event to start networking for your job or internship search!

Monday, March 28th
9:00am-11:00am
Michigan League Ballroom

Registered Employers: Ann Arbor District Library, Biggs|Gillmore, BlackBaud, Cengage Learning, EMU Libraries, Enlighten, Ford Motor Company, ForeSee Results, HathaiTrust, ITHAKA/JSTOR, Kane Koval Associates, M Library LIT/Library Systems, Media Genesis, Menlo Innovations, MSU Libraries, Open.Michigan, ProQuest, Quicken Loans, Systems in Motion, UM Kresge Business Administration Library, UM Law Library, UM Libraries Human Resources, UM Library MPublishing, UM Museum of Art, UM Special Collections Library, UM Taubman Health Sciences Library, Washtenaw Community Health Organization and more!

RSVP in iTrack to attend!

Posted by shamille on March 07, 2011 at 11:18 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, February 21, 2011

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
ASB Events
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Workshops/Programs
PEP Rally: Practical Engagement Program Information Session
Tuesday, February 22
4:00-5:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

All first year students are REQUIRED to attend a Practical Engagement Program (PEP) information session if you intend on receiving academic credit for a Summer or Fall internship. Learn how to obtain your 8 PEP credits (required to graduate). Find out about the Practical Engagement Program requirements, registration process, including the CPT process for international students, in order to be eligible to receive academic credit for your upcoming internships.

The Art of Negotiation
Thursday, February 17
11:30-1:00 p.m.
1255 North Quad

Come to this great workshop and learn the do’s and don’ts of the job offer negotiation process. Tips for how to most effectively negotiate your salary — and other benefits — will be presented.

ASB Events
Pre-Departure Meetings
All students who are participating in the 2011 School of Information Alternative Spring Break Program are required to attend their city session.

Detroit/Make-up Session
Monday, February 21
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Washington D.C.
Tuesday, February 22
11:30-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Chicago
Wednesday, February 23
11:30-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

New York
Thursday, February 24
11:30-1:00 p.m.
1255 North Quad

Did You Know?
Did you know that spring break is a prime time to develop useful networking contacts? Set up informational interviews with people who work in your desired career area to gain valuable job search knowledge.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Monday, February 21 from Noon to 5
Wednesday, February 23 from 3 to 5
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on February 21, 2011 at 10:02 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, February 14, 2011

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Workshops/Programs
What Can You Do With a MSI?
Career Exploration Series: Library and Information Services

Wednesday, February 16
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

In this session, the Library and Information Services specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Internship Search Panel
Thursday, February 17
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

What organizations are hiring SI students for summer internships? How can you make yourself more marketable to a specific industry? What resources and methods have proven most effective for obtaining an internship? When do I need to start my search? Does networking really work?

Job Searching in a Tight Market
Friday, February 18
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

Are you experiencing a challenging job search? You’re not alone! Come to this workshop to find out what it takes to get a job in this economy. Get tips and advice from UM career experts on what it takes to succeed! Hear stories from other students on what’s working for them… and what’s not.

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Feb 22 PEP Rally (Practical Engagement Program) Information Session
Feb 23 The Art of Negotiation

Did You Know?
Twitter is fast becoming a common job search tool?

Using Twitter for Your Job Search Lifehacker’s Katharine Brooks provides a good run-down http://lifehacker.com/#!5749380/how-to-use-twitter-to-help-you-find-a-new-job on using Twitter to generate job leads, connect with industry professionals, and position yourself as knowledgeable in your field. Additional job search tips and tricks can be yours for the low, low price of a @sicareers follow.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Emily Bowman
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Tuesday, February 15 from 12:30 to 5
Wednesday, February 16 from 2 to 3
Friday, February 18 from 1 to 5
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on February 14, 2011 at 10:49 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, February 7, 2011

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
Employers @SI
Mock Interviews @SI
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Other Events on Campus
Did You Know?
ASB Update
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Workshops/Programs
PEP Rally (Practical Engagement Program Information Session)
Monday, February 7
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

All first year students are REQUIRED to attend a Practical Engagement Program (PEP) information session if you intend on receiving academic credit for a Summer or Fall internship. Learn how to obtain your 8 PEP credits (required to graduate). Find out about the Practical Engagement Program requirements, registration process, including the CPT process for international students, in order to be eligible to receive academic credit for your upcoming internships.

Using LinkedIn For Your Job Search
Tuesday, February 8
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

Join SI Career Development in a comprehensive overview of how to effectively use LinkedIn for your internship or job search. Tips for how to develop a profile, network with contacts, and utilize the system to gather contacts and company information. Students with and without LinkedIn profiles are encouraged to attend.

Interviewing For Success
Wednesday, February 9
12:00-1:00 p.m.
1255 North Quad

Gain an overview of how to prepare and present yourself best in an interviewing situation. Research resources, what to wear, what to say, what sort of questions you’ll be asked, how to answer interview questions, and follow-up techniques will be reviewed.

What Can You Do With a MSI?
Career Exploration Series: Library and Information Services

Thursday, February 10
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

In this session, the Library and Information Services specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

SLA Internship Panel
Friday, February 11
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Learn about all of the amazing internships SI students obtain. Second year SI SLA student panelists will present on their summer internship experiences. Panels will be career/industry-specific. This is a wonderful opportunity to explore the type of internship you would like to obtain for next summer.

Employers @SI
Cengage Learning
User Experience Intern, Summer 2011
Wednesday, February 9
3360 North Quad
Schedule is full

Portland State University Information Session
eGov Internships, 2011 Oregon Fellowship Program
Friday, February 11
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3356 North Quad

Sign up in iTrack is REQUIRED by Wednesday, February 9th. Space is limited!

Mock Interviews @SI
The Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village
Friday, February 11
2:00-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule is full

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Feb 17 Internship Search Panel
Feb 18 Job Searching in a Tight Market
Feb 22 PEP Rally (Practical Engagement Program Information Session)
Feb 23 The Art of Negotiation

Other Events on Campus
MPowered Career Fair
Wednesday, February 9
1:00-5:00 p.m.
Michigan Union

The MPowered Career Fair is designed specifically for small businesses to connect with University of Michigan students for both full-time and internship opportunities.

For more information, visit: http://mpowered.umich.edu/careerfair.

Did You Know?
Have you missed a CDO workshop this year, and now would like to access the information presented? For your convenience, all CDO workshops are available on the Career Development ctools site http://ctools.umich.edu.

ASB Update
Bring your pennies THIS WEEK for PENNY WARS!

Help raise money for Alternative Spring Break 2011 by participating in PENNY WAR!

SI Students will be collecting money at a table outside of the SI Student Lounge on the first floor of North Quad from 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. daily from February 7 - 11, 2011.

If you don’t have any change or you are not going to be near North Quad this week, you can make a donation via the SI ASB 2011 Crowdrise site (http://www.crowdrise.com/siasb2011/fundraiser/umsi).

This is a battle, so if you have never done a penny war before here are a few Rules of Engagement:

• Offense - Put pennies (and checks) in the container corresponding with your SI affiliation.
• Defense - Put silver change and bills in the containers of your opponents to detract from their totals.

Checks made out to the University of Michigan are acceptable, will be counted as an offense, and are considered to be a tax-deductible donation to the university.

Thanks for your support! You can follow Penny Wars activities on Facebook and Twitter all day long.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Monday, February 7 from 12:30 to 5
Wednesday, February 9 from 2 to 5
Friday, February 11 from 2 to 5
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on February 07, 2011 at 10:55 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, January 31, 2011

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
Mock Interviews @SI
On-Campus Recruiting @SI
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Other Events on Campus
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Workshops/Programs
Resume Writing Workshop
Tuesday, February 1
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

In this hands-on workshop, learn how to write and utilize a well-written and formatted resume. The main components of a resume will be included, including tips on how to tailor a resume and make it catch the eye of an employer. Alternative resume strategies will also be covered.

***Please bring your own resume.****

Marketing Your PEP Experience For Your Job Search
Thursday, February 3
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Come to this workshop to learn how to market the valuable hands-on experience you have gained through your PEP projects and PEP internships for your job search.

RSVP for all workshops in iTrack!

Mock Interviews @SI
The Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village
Friday, February 4
2:00-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Wednesday, February 2

Practice and hone your interview skills by participating in a mock interview at SI. This is a valuable opportunity to practice with a real employer who is volunteering their time to support SI students in the professional development. Sign up for an interview in iTrack by February 2.!

YOU MUST HAVE AN APPROVED RESUME in iTrack to be able to schedule an interview.

On-Campus Recruiting @SI
Cengage Learning
User Experience Intern, Summer 2011
Wednesday, February 9
9:45-3:45 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Monday, February 7

Open sign-up begins Monday, January 31!

YOU MUST HAVE AN APPROVED RESUME in iTrack to be able to schedule an interview.

UPDATE: Please note the date change!

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Feb 7 PEP Rally: Practical Engagement Program Information Session
Feb 8 Using LinkedIn for Your Job Search
Feb 9 Interviewing for Success Workshop
Feb 10 What Can You Do With an MSI? LIS

Other Events on Campus
Winter Engineering Career Fair
Thursday, February 3
10:00-3:00 p.m.
North Campus

This is a great opportunity for you to network and connect with high profile organizations for your job or internship search. While this fair is geared towards Engineering students, SI students are welcome to attend, and often stand out to employers given your unique perspective and skill set that you can offer to any employer. Check out the list of participating organizations here http://www.careercenter.umich.edu/students/events/enginfair.html.

Cosponsored by: the Engineering Career Resource Center and The Career Center

Did You Know?
The UM Career Center offers comprehensive career services and resources to all UM students. They should definitely be ONE of your job or internship resources. This week-- check out their website to prepare for the Engineering Career Fair http://www.careercenter.umich.edu/students/events/enginfair.html.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Monday, January 31 from 12 to 5
Tuesday, February 1 from 11 to 2
Friday, February 4 from 2 to 5
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on January 31, 2011 at 10:10 AM | Comments (0)

HOW TO: Find Employer-Specific Job Search Advice

It is not uncommon for SI students to set their sights on where they want to be when all of this "grad school stuff" is said and done pretty early in the game. Orientation was rife with exclamations of where SI students want to be two years down the road: "I want to work at Microsoft!" or "I'll be at the Library of Congress when I'm finished".

Perhaps you're dreaming of dining at the limitless cafeteria, courtesy of Google. Maybe you're ready to cross a night at the (Smithsonian) museum off of your bucket list. And maybe Twitter is your employer of choice (you ought to get paid for how much time you spend on the service, right?). And let's not forget the startups!

If you've got it narrowed down, good for you! But chances are that a lot of other people are aiming for that bullseye as well. So, in addition to the general career advice you'll be stocking up on throughout graduate school, make sure you take the time to research your employer of choice specifically. Find out what they are looking for now, while you still have plenty of time to rack up internship hours and open source project contributions. A simple google search will often suffice, but if the web doesn't deliver, head to mLibrary for access to career databases and research assistance from the mid-west's finest librarians.

Posted by embow on January 21, 2011 at 01:09 PM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, January 17, 2011

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
Other Events on Campus
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week
Career Tip of the Week

Workshops/Programs
International Internship Search Panel
Tuesday, January 18
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Interested in an international internship for your summer PEP intern experience? Hear from second year students who participated in an internship abroad during 2010. Panelists will share information on how they found their internship, funding opportunities, and what they did. Please come with questions!

Resume Writing Workshop
Wednesday, January 19
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

In this hands-on workshop, learn how to write and utilize a well-written and formatted resume. The main components of a resume will be included, including tips on how to tailor a resume and make it catch the eye of an employer. ***Please bring your own resume***

What Can You Do With a MSI?
Career Exploration Series: Human-Computer Interaction

Thursday, January 20
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

In this session, the Human-Computer Interaction specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Uganda Summer Archives Internship
Thursday, January 20
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3356 North Quad

Students interested in learning more about archival internship opportunities in Uganda should attend this information session. Derek Peterson, Associate Director at the UM African Studies Center, will be at SI to share information on the project opportunity and to answer any questions.

expoSItion 2011 Information Session
Friday, January 21
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

Come by the expo information session to learn more about this great SI event, what to expect, how to prepare, and to view some of the past projects. WHAT IS THE EXPOSITION? It’s an annual SI event where students exhibit projects to potential employers, peers, prospective students, faculty, and the U-M community.

Other Events on Campus
Winter Global Education Fair
Thursday, January 20
2:00-5:30 p.m.
Michigan Union, Ballroom

Come attend an informational fair and learn about CGIS programs.

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Jan 25 Federal Careers Day
Jan 25 Cover Letter Writing Workshop
Jan 26 U.S. Job Search for International Students
Jan 28 Social Networking and Your Job Search

Did You Know?
The SLA offers a mentoring program that can help you navigate your career path. Mentors are still available from SLA/Michigan, but only if you act now!

The Special Libraries Association (SLA) is an organization of dynamic and change-oriented information professionals (IPs), who strategically use information in their jobs to advance the mission of the organization. Information organizations (such as libraries, information centers, competitive intelligence units or knowledge resource centers) are defined as those entities that deliver information-based solutions to a given market. IPs develop, deploy, and manage information resources and services, harnessing technology as a critical tool to accomplish goals.

You can be a part of this, just by filling out a simple form at http://units.sla.org/chapter/cmi/mentor.html. Mentors are standing by.

Opportunity is knocking— answer the door!

Walk-in Hours for the Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Wednesday, January 19 from 2 to 5
Friday, January 21 from 1 to 4
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Career Tip of the Week
UPDATE your resume and profile on iTrack!

Posted by shamille on January 18, 2011 at 10:20 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, January 10, 2011

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know

Welcome back! We hope you had a fun, restful, and rejuvenating holiday break.

CDO events are in full swing! We will be offering MANY professional skills and career development workshops/programs to help you manage and succeed in your career development and job search efforts this term.

We try to make sure all students know what we are doing every week so watch for our event information in our weekly newsletter so please read it each week so you don’t miss anything. If you miss a newsletter, don’t worry, our events can also be found in iTrack, *some* email reminders, and the CDO blog http://mblog.lib.umich.edu/sicareers/ as these are the primary resources we use to communicate and share information with students. WE ENCOURAGE (and sometimes require) all students to RSVP for all of our events through iTrack!

Remember, we’re here to help you with your career and job search needs. Make an appointment with us to get that resume updated or just to strategize your job/internship search plans this semester.

Scheduled appointments are encouraged and can be made by emailing si.careers@umich.edu. Please indicate your year in the program and topic to discuss.

Or contact us directly:
Joanna Kroll jckroll@umich.edu (2nd+ students)
Kelly Kowatch kkowatch@umich.edu (1st year students)

Workshops/Programs
Career Development Orientation for Winter 2011 Students
Monday, January 10
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Get up to date on the services and resources provided by the SI Career Development Office. “Help! I need to find a part-time job fast!” Learn about the most effective resources and methods for landing a PT job! Receive career advising from your “buddy”. “Internship this summer or not? What’s this PEP thing all about?” We’ll address these questions and many more! The SI Career Development Staff will provide you with tips and advice to get you up to speed on the services we offer and related activities this term!

International Opportunities Funding Workshop with the UM EAO
Thursday, January 13
12:00-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

Staff from the UM International Center’s Education Abroad Office will come to SI to share information on how to identify and apply for funding for international internships, research projects, and other international opportunities.

International Internships Information Session with UM AIESEC and UM IAESTE
Friday, January 14
12:00-1:00 p.m.
3100 North Quad

Representatives from the UM student organizations AIESEC and IAESTE will be at North Quad to talk about international internship opportunities related to their organizations. Both student organizations are groups that facilitate the exchange of internships with international organizations, providing an economical means to secure internships internationally for UM students.

About AIESEC – http://www.aiesecmichigan.com/
About IAESTE – http://www.iaestemichigan.com/wiki/

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Jan 14: International Internships Information Session
Jan 18: International Internship Search Panel
Jan 19: Resume Writing Workshop
Jan 20: What Can You Do With an MSI? HCI
Jan 21: expoSItion Information Session
Jan 25: Cover Letter Writing Workshop
Jan 26: U.S. Job Search for International Students
Jan 28: Social Networking and Your Job Search

Did You Know?
Gaming is becoming a fast growing industry. For those interested in a career in gaming, here is a great resource for jobs and industry information http://www.gamasutra.com/.

Posted by shamille on January 10, 2011 at 10:01 AM | Comments (0)

Need a bright, motivated MSI student?

The School of Information is actively soliciting host organizations for Alternative Spring Break. Last year more than 100 SI master’s degree students spent the week of spring break working at over 50 nonprofit, cultural, educational, and government organizations in New York, Chicago, Detroit, and Washington, D.C. They worked on information-management service projects for institutions like the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens, the Huffington Post, the Cabrini-Connections Tutor/Mentor Connection, the United Nations, and the Detroit Public Library.

Projects included archiving, cataloging, research, web development, digitizing, curating, creating online tutorials, and database development.

If your organization, or one you know, could use a dedicated, capable — and best of all, free — graduate student (or two or three!) for a week in March, please contact Kelly Kowatch at kkowatch@umich.edu.

Alternative Spring Break host sites must be:

• A public sector organization (non-profit, government, education, or cultural)

• In the metropolitan area of Chicago, Detroit, New York City, or Washington, D.C., accessible through public transportation from the downtown area (with the exception of Detroit)

• Willing to provide a professional-level project or projects related to the School of Information’s areas of study

• Willing to spend time with the students, providing them with a well-rounded experience, educating them on the purpose of the organization, and introducing them to relevant colleagues

The application deadline for host organizations is Jan. 7, 2011.

Posted by kkowatch on December 06, 2010 at 08:39 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, December 6, 2010

In this Edition
Workshops/Programs
Recruiting @Ross
Walk-in Hours for the Week
RSVP for Winter Events

Workshops/Programs
Creating Your Brand II
Tuesday, December 7
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

This is a follow-up session to the Creating Your Brand I session in which participants will be able to share and refine their personal branding statement. Attendance to the first work shop is not required, but suggested.

What Can You Do With a MSI?
Career Exploration Series: Archives and Records Management

Wednesday, December 8
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

In this session, the Archives and Records Management specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Holiday Job Search Planning with the Career Development Office
Wednesday, December 8
5:00-6:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Take a break from your studying, for some festive holiday refreshments, and to ask any questions you might have regarding your job search planning over the holidays. The Career Development Office (CDO) staff will be available to review resumes and cover letters, offer strategic job search tips over the holidays, or we can simply be available to answer any job search or career questions you might have.

Recruiting @Ross
These employer visits are facilitated through the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and is not an employer event at the School of Information. All UM students are welcome to attend employer visits at Ross; however, SI students should be prepared to discuss with recruiters and company representatives what it is that they are studying at the School of Information and how they are a fit for their company.

Some of the companies this week include: The Cambridge Group, Goldman, Sachs & Company, Deloitte, and more!

Check iTrack for the full list of employer visits!

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Emily Bowman
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Wednesday, December 8 from Noon to 5
Friday, December 10 from Noon to 4
3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

RSVP for Winter Events
We have lots of programs and workshops planned for the Winter 2011 semester - see iTrack for a complete listing. Enjoy your break!

Posted by shamille on December 03, 2010 at 03:12 PM | Comments (0)

Capitalizing on the Holiday Season: Informational Interviews

With the semester winding down and the holidays drawing near, the last thing on your mind may be your inevitable job search. But the few weeks leading up to the winter holidays may be a great time for one key task: the informational interview. The period of time between Thanksgiving and New Years is one where relatively few industries are swamped with work. Libraries, archives, web development firms... nearly all of the staff in these establishments will be counting the days until vacation and postponing major projects until after the new year. There is no better time to identify a professional that you want to learn from, set up an interview, and spend 30-60 minutes discussing the field in which you want to explore.

Ready to take a stab at it? Check out these resources for tips on informational interviewing:

How Does Informational Interviewing Work?
Mastering the Informational Interview
My Pet Peeves About Informational Interviews

Posted by embow on December 03, 2010 at 01:18 PM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, November 29, 2010

In this Edition
Employers @SI
ASB Updates
Workshops/Programs

Employers @SI
Abbott Labs
Information Session
Tuesday, November 30
Noon-1:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Informational Interviews
Tuesday, November 30
1:15-4:30 p.m. (30 minute interviews)
3360 North Quad

Are you a full-time student interested in a Records Management Internship with Abbott Laboratories?

If so, please join us Tuesday, November 30, 2010 in the Ehrlicher Room (3100 NQ) at Noon for an informative presentation. Lunch will be provided and interviews for candidates interested in a summer internship with Abbott Corporate Records will begin at 1:15 p.m.

Abbott Corporate Records offers summer interns opportunities to work in a variety of areas, such as: Records Policy and Procedure, Information Analysis and Retrieval and eRecords Management. The facility is located near Abbott’s global headquarters just north of Chicago, with easy access to expressways, railways and airports.

Abbott Internships can offer students:
Paid, relevant work experience
12-week assignment (average)
Subsidized housing and transportation available for eligible students
Networking opportunities for future employment
Access to industry experts and senior leaders
Career development, social and philanthropic activity opportunities

ASB Updates
Book SALE
All proceeds go to the ASB program!

Wednesday, December 1
Thursday, December 2
9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
NQ Media Gateway

GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT LOW PRICES!!!!

Workshops/Programs
Demystifying the Federal Job Search
Sponsored by the Career Development Office & SIIP (Student Interested in Information Policy)
Wednesday, December 1
Noon-1 p.m.
3100 NQ (Ehrlicher Room)

Have you been on USAJOBS recently and wondered how to find and get your dream job at the Library of Congress, National Archives or FTC? Join SIIP and Joanna Kroll as we demystify the Federal hiring process. Joanna will lead a practical overview of the Federal job seeking and hiring process. She will provide some tips on Federal resumes, position details such as pay grades and titles, tips on how to use Federal job sites, and more!

ePortfolio Panel
Thursday, December 2
Noon-1 p.m.
3100 NQ (Ehrlicher Room)

Join local employers and recruiters in this interactive panel experience. Panelists will publicly review and critique current SI students online portfolios. A must-attend event for anyone who has an ePortfolio or plans to develop one.

International Opportunities Funding
Friday, December 3
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 NQ

Staff from the UM International Center’s Education Abroad Office will come to SI to share information on how to identify and apply for funding for international internships, research projects, and other international opportunities.

Career Exploration Series: Archives and Preservation
Wednesday, December 8 (new date)
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 NQ

In this session, the Archives and Records Management specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Posted by shamille on November 29, 2010 at 09:40 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, November 22, 2010

In this Edition
Job Search Tip over Thanksgiving Break
Employers @SI
ASB Updates
Workshops/Programs
Did You Know?

Job Search Tips over Thanksgiving Break
1)Enjoy, relax and have some fun!
2)Eat lots of yummy food, and embrace quality time with friends and family!
3)To keep your job/internship search momentum going, take a little time to think about your top 10 dream organizations—make a list, and bring it into our office after the break. We can help you strategize your search methods to position yourself for a job within these organizations.

Put these events on your calendar for AFTER BREAK...

Employers @SI
Abbott Labs
Information Session
Tuesday, November 30
Noon-1:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Informational Interviews
Tuesday, November 30
1:15-4:30 p.m. (30 minute interviews)
3360 North Quad

Are you a full-time student interested in a Records Management Internship with Abbott Laboratories?

If so, please join us Tuesday, November 30, 2010 in the Ehrlicher Room (3100 NQ) at Noon for an informative presentation. Lunch will be provided and interviews for candidates interested in a summer internship with Abbott Corporate Records will begin at 1:15 p.m.

Abbott Corporate Records offers summer interns opportunities to work in a variety of areas, such as: Records Policy and Procedure, Information Analysis and Retrieval and eRecords Management. The facility is located near Abbott’s global headquarters just north of Chicago, with easy access to expressways, railways and airports.

Abbott Internships can offer students:
Paid, relevant work experience
12-week assignment (average)
Subsidized housing and transportation available for eligible students
Networking opportunities for future employment
Access to industry experts and senior leaders
Career development, social and philanthropic activity opportunities

ASB Updates
Book SALE
All proceeds go to the ASB program!

Wednesday, December 1
Thursday, December 2
9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
NQ Media Gateway

GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFTS AT LOW PRICES!!!!

Workshops/Programs
Career Exploration Series: Archives and Preservation
Wednesday, December 1
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 NQ

In this session, the Archives and Records Management specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Demystifying the Federal Job Search
Sponsored by the Career Development Office & SIIP (Student Interested in Information Policy)
Wednesday, December 1
Noon-1 p.m.
3100 NQ (Ehrlicher Room)

Have you been on USAJOBS recently and wondered how to find and get your dream job at the Library of Congress, National Archives or FTC? Join SIIP and Joanna Kroll as we demystify the Federal hiring process. Joanna will lead a practical overview of the Federal job seeking and hiring process. She will provide some tips on Federal resumes, position details such as pay grades and titles, tips on how to use Federal job sites, and more!

ePortfolio Panel
Thursday, December 2
Noon-1 p.m.
3100 NQ (Ehrlicher Room)

Join local employers and recruiters in this interactive panel experience. Panelists will publicly review and critique current SI students online portfolios. A must-attend event for anyone who has an ePortfolio or plans to develop one.

International Opportunities Funding
Friday, December 3
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 NQ

Staff from the UM International Center’s Education Abroad Office will come to SI to share information on how to identify and apply for funding for international internships, research projects, and other international opportunities.

Did You Know?
The Career Development Office is open and available for student
appointments M-W of this week. Contact si.careers@umich.edu
for an appointment.

Posted by shamille on November 22, 2010 at 09:36 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, November 15, 2010

In this Edition:
Mock Interviews @SI
Workshops/Programs
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Other Events on Campus
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Mock Interviews @SI
UM Kresge Business Administration Library
Thursday, November 18
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Tuesday, November 16th at 11:59 p.m.

Take advantage of this valuable opportunity to practice your interview skills. Employers are volunteering their time to help you practice and hone your interview skills. Even if the employer isn’t not a targeted employer for your job search, you can still gain some valuable feedback and skills to prepare you for upcoming interviews.

Workshops/Programs
Creating Your Brand I - This is a two-part series. To get the most out of this series, you are encouraged to attend both sessions!
Tuesday, November 16
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

Do you have trouble articulating what it is that you are learning at SI? Not sure exactly how to develop an “elevator pitch”? Join this interactive workshop and develop a plan for sharing what it is that you are seeking in your future career and how to sell yourself and your skills. All participants will collaboratively create a personal branding statement.

Practical Engagement Program (PEP) Information Session
Thursday, November 18
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 North Quad

All first year students are REQUIRED to attend a Practical Engagement Program (PEP) information session if you intend on receiving academic credit for a Winter 2011 internship. Learn how to obtain your eight PEP credits (required to graduate). Find out about the Practical Engagement Program requirements, registration process, including the CPT process for international students, in order to be eligible to receive academic credit for your upcoming internships.
1st year students who plan on participating in a Summer 2011 internship, you will be required to attend a PEP Information Session next semester. Watch for details!

The Unpanel for Uncareers
Friday, November 19
Noon-2 p.m.
3100 NQ (Ehrlicher Room)

SLA and SI-CDO are co-sponsoring a panel on other careers for librarians. Four non-tradiational librarians will talk with students about what they do and how they got started.

Panelists include:
Jeremy York, Hathi Trust
Shana Kimball, MPublishing Outreach
Rebecca Welzenbach, MPublishing Digital Production
Lanell James, Proquest Market Development Manager

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Nov 30 Abbott Presentation
Dec 1 Archives and Preservation: What Can You Do With an MSI?
Dec 2 ePortfolio Panel
Dec 3 International Opportunities Funding

Other Events on Campus
Entrepreneurship: The Unintentional Career Path
Hosted by the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan
Monday, November 15
6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.
Alumni Center

Identifying a need and doing something about it is what is at the heart of entrepreneurship. But how do you find those needs? How do you figure out what to do about it? What does it take to become an entrepreneur? How do you overcome challenges you might face?

Learn how two recent U-M alumni did all of this and more to create their own company, Real Time Farms. Karl, ’03, MSE’05, and Cara, ’03, Rosaen created Real Time Farms to engage and educate consumers about their local food ecosystem; connecting them to their local farmers and all of the ways they can find local, farm fresh food in their communities, and to provide tools for restaurants and food retailers to showcase to consumers all of the ways they source locally.

You’ll walk away from this session of Real Life 101 with a clearer vision of how to become an entrepreneur and knowing how to capitalize on the needs the greater population may have.

The event is free, and dinner will be provided.

Check http://mpowered.umich.edu/node/213 for information and to register.

Recruiting @Ross Events
There are multiple Recruiting @Ross company information sessions this week.

These employer visits are facilitated through the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and is not an employer event at the School of Information. All UM students are welcome to attend employer visits at Ross; however, SI students should be prepared to discuss with recruiters and company representatives what it is that they are studying at the School of Information and how they are a fit for their company.

Some of the companies this week include: Boston Consulting, P&G, AT Kearney, Tencent Company, A2TechMeetUp, and more.

Check iTrack for the full list of employer visits!

Did You Know?
The 2009 SI Employment Report is now
available online at http://www.si.umich.edu/careers/2009-employment-report.pdf.htm.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Emily Bowman
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Tuesdday, November 16 from Noon to 2:30 p.m. – 3360 North Quad
Wednesday, November 17 from Noon to 5:00 p.m. – 3360 North Quad
Thursday, November 18 from Noon to 1:00 p.m. – 3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on November 16, 2010 at 08:40 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, November 8, 2010

In this Edition:
Employers @SI
Other Events on Campus
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Workshops/Programs
Did You Know?
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Employers @SI
Cataphora, Inc
Thursday, November 11
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad
Speaker: Chris Kurecka, Software Engineer specializing in User Experience

About Cataphora
Cataphora’s technical staff comprises experts in a variety of fields and methodologies, including software engineering, mathematics, linguistics, sociology, and information retrieval. We constantly strive to invent new technologies to help our customers, and to improve the technologies we already have.

Cataphora’s founding technology was invented to address the real business problem of making sense of fast growing volumes of information that were communicated in ever shorter messages across an increasing variety of channels. We have continued to build on our initial ideas and extend them. For example, we have since invented and patented high-performance search technology that powers our own Cataphora Query Engine and we continually develop sophisticated analytics to provide our customers with ever better insights into their digital data.

North Carolina State University Libraries Information Session & Informational Interviews
Friday, November 12

Information Session
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2185 North Quad - Lunch provided

Informational Interviews - Job# 715758
1:30-4:00 p.m. (20 minute interviews)
3360 North Quad
Open sign-up in iTrack -- whether you want to apply or just want to get more information. Sign-up for informational interviews are open to any interested candidates by Wednesday, November 10th.

Other Events on Campus
Graduate Internships with the UN
Tuesday, November 9
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Annenburg Auditorium, 1120 Weill Hall

Practical Idealists: Changing the World and Getting Paid
Series: “What Makes Life Worth Living?” LSA Fall 2010 Theme Semester

Tuesday, November 9
7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery in Room 100
913 S. University Ave

For more information please visit http://www.lib.umich.edu/gallery/events/practicalidealists

Public parking is available in the structure at 650 S. Forest, just south of S. University (free and open to the public).

From Ann Arbor to the White House - White House Fellows Program
Friday, November 12
2:00-3:30 p.m. (Reception to follow)
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Betty Ford
Classroom - 1110 Weill Hall

Each summer graduate students from a wide range of UM programs accept internships with UN agencies around the world. Hear from a panel of former interns about the nature of their UN work and their tips for identifying and securing UN internships.

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Nov 16 Eastern Michigan University Library Mock Interviews
Nov 16 Creating Your Brand I
Nov 18 UM Kresge Business Administration Library Mock Interviews
Nov 18 Practical Engagement Program (PEP)Information Session
Nov 30 Creating Your Brand II
Nov 30 Abbott Information Session and Informational Interviews

Workshops/Programs
SI ASB Interest Meeting
Wednesday, November 10
Noon-1:00 p.m.
1255 North Quad

Interested in ASB? Not sure why you should go? Come learn about the benefits of participating, logistics, costs, and potential sites for the School of Information’s 2011 Alternative Spring Break program. Past participants will be available to share about their experience and to answer questions.

Did You Know?
Ever wonder what federal agencies are the best places to work? You can check out the top 100 rankings here http://bestplacestowork.org/BPTW/rankings/

The Best Places to Work rankings are the most comprehensive and authoritative rating and analysis of employee satisfaction and commitment in the federal government.

NOTE: Five of the top ten agencies have recruited and hired SI grads over the past 5 years.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Emily Bowman
Tuesday, November 9 from Noon to 2:30 p.m. - 3360 NQ
Wednesday, November 10 from Noon to 5:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ
Friday, November 12 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ

If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on November 08, 2010 at 09:16 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, November 1, 2010

In this Edition:
Mock Interviews @SI
Other Career Events on Campus
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know?
Workshops/Programs
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Mock Interviews @SI
Visteon
Interaction Designer (Schedule Full)
Thursday, November 4

Cengage Learning
User Experience Specialist (Schedule Full)
Friday, November 5

Login to iTrack to sign-up for upcoming mock interviews!

Other Career Events on Campus
Abbott Recruiting Visit, Ross School of Business
Wednesday, November 3
5:00-6:30 p.m.
Ross School of Business, Office of Career Development - R2230

This employer visit is facilitated through the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and is not an employer event at the School of Information. All UM students are welcome to attend employer visits at Ross; however, SI students should be prepared to discuss with recruiters and company representatives what it is that they are studying at the School of Information and how they are a fit for their company.

NOTE: This is not the Records Management Session that was scheduled for SI. That has been rescheduled for November 30, 2010.

RSVP for Upcoming Events
SI ASB Interest Meeting
Wednesday, November 10
Noon-1:00 p.m.
1255 North Quad
Note the date change!

North Carolina State University Library Information Session
Friday, November 12
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2185 North Quad

Creating Your Brand I
Tuesday, November 16
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

UM Kresge Business Administration Library Mock Interviews
Thursday, November 18
Business Reference Librarian
3360 North Quad

PEP Information Session
Thursday, November 18
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

Creating Your Brand II
Tuesday, November 30
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

Abbott Labs: Information Session & Informational Interviews
Tuesday, November 30

Information Session
Noon-1:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room) - Lunch provided

Informational Interviews
1:15-4:30 p.m. (30 minute interviews)
3360 North Quad

Are you a full-time student interested in a Records Management Internship with Abbott Laboratories?

If so, please join us Tuesday, November 30, 2010 in the Ehrlicher Room (3100 NQ) at Noon for an informative presentation. Lunch will be provided and interviews for candidates interested in a summer internship with Abbott Corporate Records will begin at 1:15 p.m.

Abbott Corporate Records offers summer interns opportunities to work in a variety of areas, such as: Records Policy and Procedure, Information Analysis and Retrieval and eRecords Management. The facility is located near Abbott’s global headquarters just north of Chicago, with easy access to expressways, railways and airports.

Abbott is a global, broad-based health care company with products that span the continuum of care, from nutritional products and laboratory diagnostics to medical devices and pharmaceutical therapies. For more information about Abbott, visit www.abbott.com.

Did You Know?
In 2009 92% of MSI graduates reported high satisfaction rates in their career outcomes in terms of ideal fit for their careers?

Workshops/Programs
Career Exploration Series: Social Computing
Thursday, November 4
Noon-1:00 p.m.
2255 North Quad

In this session, the Social Computing specialization will be introduced, examined and information will be shared on the following to help you envision your career pathway and prepare for success: required skills and abilities, employment outlook, salaries, job outcomes, industry trends, testimonies and tips, and much more.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Emily Bowman
Wednesday, November 3 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ
Thursday, November 4 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ

If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on November 01, 2010 at 08:36 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 25, 2010

In this Edition:
Employers @SI
Mock Interviews @SI
Did You Know?
Workshops/Programs
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Employers @SI
Abbott Labs: Information Session & Informational Interviews
Wednesday, October 27

Information Session
Noon-1:30 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room) - Lunch provided

Informational Interviews
1:15-4:30 p.m. (30 minute interviews)
3360 North Quad

Are you a full-time student interested in a Records Management Internship with Abbott Laboratories?

If so, please join us Wednesday, October 27, 2010 in the Ehrlicher Room (3100 NQ) at Noon for an informative presentation. Lunch will be provided and interviews for candidates interested in a summer internship with Abbott Corporate Records will begin at 1:15 p.m.

Abbott Corporate Records offers summer interns opportunities to work in a variety of areas, such as: Records Policy and Procedure, Information Analysis and Retrieval and eRecords Management. The facility is located near Abbott’s global headquarters just north of Chicago, with easy access to expressways, railways and airports.

Abbott is a global, broad-based health care company with products that span the continuum of care, from nutritional products and laboratory diagnostics to medical devices and pharmaceutical therapies. For more information about Abbott, visit www.abbott.com.

Mock Interviews @SI
UM Art, Architecture & Engineering Library
Science Librarian (4 Slots Available)
Friday, October 29
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 27 at 11:59 p.m.

Ithaka
User Experience Specialist (Schedule Full)
Friday, October 29
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 27 at 11:59 p.m.

Did You Know?
SI CDO has a blog that features a wide array of job search tips and resources. Check out our recent postings on How to Use LinkedIn and Tips on the Federal Internship Search. http://mblog.lib.umich.edu/

Workshops/Programs
A Day in the Life of an... Interaction Designer (sponsored by SOCHI)
Monday, October 25
7-9 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Current and past Interaction Designers will come to SI to talk about their daily responsibilities and the nuances of their field and their working environment. Please bring questions!

Careers in Electronic Publishing Webinar w/ Proquest
Thursday, October 28
3-4 p.m.
4446 North Quad

ProQuest employs more than 100 individuals with library degrees. These employees work in a variety of positions throughout the company and around the world. Join us for an hour-long webinar to learn more about some of their alternative careers in librarianship, the products these information science professionals help make possible, and the steps you can take to better position yourself to enter the job market, no matter what type of library work appeals to you! Ideal for current library or information science students.

Career Talk w/ ALA IT Policy Office (Information
Policy Careers in Washington)

Friday, October 29
Noon-1 p.m.
3100 North Quad (Ehrlicher Room)

Speaker: Alan S. Inouye, Ph.D.
Director, Office for Information Technology Policy, American Library Association, Washington

What information policy jobs are available in Washington? Who are the employers? This session will provide an overview of the diverse array of employers of information policy professionals. What are the characteristics that make them different? What are the implications of these characteristics for jobs and employees? What are some of the trends affecting current employment prospects? These topics will be addressed in a brief presentation with plenty of time for your questions.

Lunch will be provided, so please RSVP on iTrack so that we have enough for everyone.

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Emily Bowman Appointment/Walk-In Hours
Wednesday, October 27 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ
Thursday, October 28 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. - 3360 NQ

If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on October 25, 2010 at 09:38 AM | Comments (0)

Finding a Federal Internship

Finding a Federal Internship

It’s not just making a living, it’s making the difference.
Without a doubt, federal internships are the best way to get your foot in the door for a future government job. Internships are available for high school, college and graduate students, and are a great opportunity for students to learn about working in the public sector. Thousands of students work for our government each year, and you can too.

Using USAJOBS.gov
USAJOBS.gov is the government’s official careers website; the federal equivalent to monster.com. This is where you will find virtually all government job openings, complete with job descriptions and instructions for how to apply. Navigating USAJOBS.gov and understanding how to dissect a job vacancy announcement is extremely important to your federal internship search. Follow these steps to make the process easier:

**Create an account on USAJOBS.gov. Having an account allows you to use the federal resume builder and create up to five customized federal resumes. An account also allows you to generate specific searches and have the results e-mailed to you automatically!

**Keyword search is a great tool for narrowing down your results. When looking for internships, try searching for words that coincide with federal student programs such as “student temporary employment,” “student career experience” or “internship.”

**StudentJobs webpage can be found from the homepage of USAJOBS.gov. This is a great starting point when searching for specific federal student programs. You can also take advantage of student resources, including the Federal Jobs by College Major list, on the StudentJobs page.

**Questions? You should feel free to follow up directly with the human resources contact that is listed at the bottom of the “overview” section of each vacancy announcement. You can ask this contact for more information about the position as well as the hiring timeline.

Important Note: Agencies are not required to post all of their student opportunities on USAJOBS.gov. This means that USAJOBS does not serve as a comprehensive database of all student internships. Keep reading to discover more ways to find a federal internship!

Using Agency Websites
Sometimes it pays to go straight to the source, especially if you’re focusing your search on a limited number of agencies. All agencies will have a “Jobs,” “Careers” or “Opportunities” tab on their websites. These webpages may provide special instructions or have more detailed information about fellowship, internship or co-op programs. Follow these tips to make searching on these sites easier:

**Employment Opportunities is a tab featured on almost every federal agency’s website. Clicking on the employment tab will often lead you to a page featuring student opportunities and internships. Agencies will list open student positions as well as information on how to apply.

**Search Function can be used in a similar manner to the USAJOBS.gov keyword search. If an agency website is overwhelming to you, try a keyword search (often found in the top right corner of the site). Search for phrases like “student temporary employment” and “student career experience.”

**Calling Human Resources can be a very productive tactic if you are still lacking information on student programs after you complete your website research. Most agencies are happy to speak with you; just do your homework first and be polite when you call.

Other Avenues to Federal Internships
Career Fairs are hosted by a variety of organizations, universities and specialized groups of working professionals, and can be a great way to meet agency human resources contacts. Check your local convention center calendars, scour the newspaper, look at career center websites for local colleges and universities and search “federal career days” online.

Special Interest Sites can be a helpful tool in narrowing down your search. If you are considering a specific profession, there may be sites already tailored to address your needs.

Pay and Benefits
Not all federal internships are created equal. While some internships are unpaid, others are paid and include a full benefits package!

Timeline
If you are looking for a summer internship, you should start your search between September/October and January, to give yourself ample time to complete the application process. Also, keep in mind that internships requiring a high-level security clearance—for example, DOD, State, and the Intelligence Community—will have deadlines in early November to allow time for the security clearance process.

Federal Resumes
Highlight relevant coursework. Focus on the duties section of the vacancy announcement. You should cater your resume to reflect the keywords found in this section, and clearly demonstrate why you are the best candidate for the position.

Tips and Pointers
A lot of young jobseekers don’t take time to perfect their application. Jump ahead of the competition by taking the time to have someone else proofread your application!

Federal internships are competitive and sometimes it takes time to hear back from an agency. However, if you haven’t heard back from an agency, be proactive and contact them to inquire about the status of your application.

Find and Apply for Federal Jobs and Internships Online

Student Temporary Employment Program (STEP) positions are paid internships that can range from a summer job to a position that lasts as long as you are in school. STEP is similar to a traditional internship program and will allow you to gain valuable experience in a variety of fields!

Student Career Experience Program (SCEP) offers substantive internship experience with federal agencies. The work must be related to your area of study and requires the agency to have a formal commitment with your institution. Most positions are paid, and you may also receive academic credit. If you successfully complete 640 hours of work as a SCEP, you can be appointed to a permanent position without going through the traditional hiring process.

Fun Facts

**For most federal internships, you can submit a traditional resume without having to respond to any online assessments.

**Federal student internships are considered non-competitive, meaning that agencies do not have to go through all of the steps required for hiring permanent employees.

Brought to you by the Partnership for Public Service. The Partnership for Public Service is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that works to revitalize the federal government by inspiring a new generation to serve and by transforming the way government works.

Posted by kkowatch on October 22, 2010 at 08:37 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] LinkedIn Etiquette Guide for Students & Recent Grads

Last week, the SI-CDO did a five-part series on how to use LinkedIn most effectively. To round out the series, check out this resource on the etiquette related to this great online networking resource!

Q&A: LinkedIn Etiquette Guide for Students & Recent Grads

Etiquette rules in the offline world are pretty clear: Say please and thank you; shake hands firmly; keep your elbows off the table. But what are the rules for interacting professionally online? Here are some guidelines for managing your e-manners.

Q: How often should I check LinkedIn?
A: While logging in daily is ideal, what’s most important is that you maintain a consistent presence and respond to messages and connection requests in a timely fashion. LinkedIn will send you a Network Update once a week or once a day -- you can use that email as a reminder to log in and send someone a note, respond to a request or post to a group discussion.

Q: How do I make sure my LinkedIn profile is professional?
A: First, be totally truthful and never stretch the facts -- remember that your profile is public. Next, post a photo that is professionally appropriate (no pets, quirky backgrounds or funny expressions). Finally, write up your experience and credentials as you would present them on a resume or cover letter. Your writing can be a little less formal on LinkedIn, but proper grammar, spelling and
proofreading are essential.

Q: What’s the best way to request to connect with someone?
A: LinkedIn provides a basic message “I'd like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn,” but it’s a good idea to customize your requests. You’ll get a better response rate if you write a brief, personalized, polite note to each potential connection reminding them how you met (if necessary) and explaining why you’re interested in connecting -- e.g., to ask for advice or to keep in touch after meeting at a conference.

Q: How do I ask for an introduction?
A: When you request an introduction, you’ll be prompted to write a note to your mutual connection and then a separate note to the person you want to meet. In both cases, draft a compelling subject line and a short note that introduces you and explains why you hope to connect. Just remember never to ask directly for a job -- it’s not polite or appropriate.

Q: What should I do if someone doesn’t respond to my connection request or message?
A: There is no guarantee that everyone you want to connect with will want to connect with you. If you haven’t heard from a potential connection in over a month, it’s okay to send that person an email to say that you’ve reached out and would like to connect. If that doesn’t work, it’s best to move on to people who are more interested or responsive.

Q: How do I handle a request from someone I don’t know or don’t want to connect with?
A: You can either reply with a short note requesting an explanation (“Hi - can you remind me how we know each other?”) or you can click “Archive” to ignore the request or save it for the future. If you definitely don’t want to connect, simply click “Archive” and move on. If you want to report the person as a spammer, then click “I don’t know this user.” Users who receive several of these clicks are
removed from LinkedIn.

Q: Will people know if I un-connect from them?
A: If you unconnect from someone, that person will not be alerted. Of course, if that person looks through his or her contacts or attempts to send you a message, you will no longer be shown as a 1stdegree connection.

Q: How many groups should I join?
A: The number of groups you belong to on LinkedIn should reflect approximately the number of professional affiliations you have (or want to have) in real life. For instance, if you attend college, are an accounting major and love social media, it would be great to join your alumni group, an accounting group or two and a social media group or two. To get the most benefit from group participation, quality trumps quantity.

Q: What is the most polite way to ask someone to write a recommendation for me?
A: Most importantly, you want to request recommendations from people who really know you and your work, such as former bosses or professors. Customize each Recommendation Request with a polite, gracious and personalized note, and provide a few words outlining the accomplishments or qualities this person might mention about you. And, of course, always thank the person for writing the
recommendation.

Q: What’s appropriate to write in my LinkedIn status updates?
A: Although LinkedIn status updates can cross-post with Twitter, be careful only to post professional comments to LinkedIn. This means no posts about the weather or your crazy cat. The best status updates are like snippets from a networking conversation: quick notes about events you’re attending, accomplishments you’re proud of, articles or books you’ve read and professional announcements like
a new position. Overall, use your judgment, be polite and act maturely. If you wouldn’t do it in person, don’t do it on LinkedIn!

Posted by kkowatch on October 18, 2010 at 10:14 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Monday, October 18, 2010

In this Edition:
Mock Interviews @SI
International Career Events
RSVP for Upcoming Events
Did You Know?
Workshops/Programs
Walk-in Hours for the Week

Mock Interviews @SI
Ann Arbor District Library
Wednesday, October 20
1:00-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Monday, October 18 at 11:59 p.m.

UM Kresge Business Administration Library
Friday, October 22
Thursday, November 18
1:00-5:00 p.m.
3360 North Quad
Schedule closes Wednesday, October 20 at 11:59 p.m.

Take advantage of this valuable opportunity to practice your interview skills. Employers are volunteering their time to help you practice and hone your interview skills. Even if the employer isn’t not a targeted employer for your job search, you can still gain some valuable feedback and skills to prepare you for upcoming interviews.

International Career Events
Global Careers in Engineering, Information and Technology
Tuesday, October 19
5:30-7:00 p.m.
Chrysler Center Lobby (North Campus)

This panel discussion regarding Global Careers in Engineering, Information and Technology will feature representatives from Schlumberger, Whirlpool, P3, Deloitte, IBM and an international student from India who had an internship in Shanghai.

This panel is part of the International Career Pathways events, which brings University of Michigan students together with educators and employers to explore pathways to international careers through opportunities for significant experiences abroad (work, internships, volunteering and research abroad) and international education, both on-campus and abroad.

Please RSVP for this event at https://www.engin.umich.edu/form/globalcareerspanel as light food will be served. Information regarding the International Career Pathways events is available online at http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt/work/resources/ICP

Careers in Global Health
Wednesday, October 20
5:00-6:30 p.m.
Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room

Representatives from organizations involved in various aspects of international health and humanitarian relief will share the paths they took to reach their current positions, as well as discuss the key elements to preparing for a successful career in international health. http://www.globalhealth.umich.edu/pdf/careersinglobalhealth.pdf

International Environmental Careers Panel
Wednesday, October 20
3:00-4:30 p.m.
1040 Dana Building

International Opportunities Fair
Thursday, October 21
2:00-6:00 p.m.
Michigan Union

The International Opportunities Fair is a great way to connect with organizations with an international focus right here on campus! Go to http://www.careercenter.umich.edu/students/events/intlfair.html for more information.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Foreign Services Officer Program
Friday, October 22
11:00 a.m.-Noon
School of Public Health, 1690 Crossroads Building (Lane Auditorium)

Come hear about opportunities through USAID’s Foreign Service Officer Program!

RSVP for Upcoming Events
Oct 25 Day in the Life of an Interaction Designer
Oct 27 Abbott Presentation
Oct 28 Electronic Publishing Webinar
Oct 29 UM Art, Architecture, and Engineering Library Mock Interviews
Oct 29 Career Talk with ALA Policy Office

Did You Know?
Menlo Innovations offers tours of their office space open to students (free pizza!). Check out this truly unique organizational culture. RSVP to attend - or if that doesn’t fit your schedule, check out other upcoming tour dates at http://www.menloinnovations.com/events/index.htm

410 N. 4th Avenue, 3rd Floor
Wednesday, October 20
5:00-6:00 p.m.

Workshops/Programs
Federal Internships: Find and Apply for Summer 2011
Wednesday, October 20
5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
2245 North Quad

This webinar, a product of the Partnership’s Making the Difference Campaign, is for students interested in finding and applyingfor internships for Summer 2011, as well as those advisors looking for more information about federal opportunities to share with their students. During this session, we will highlight a number of exciting internships across government, and show you how to research, find and apply for an internship that’s right for you.

SAA Day in the Life of a Digital Archivist
Thursday, October 21
Noon-1 p.m.
2255 North Quad

Digital Archivists from a range of units and organizations will come to SI to talk about their daily responsibilities, career paths, and related skills. Tips and advice will be shared on how to gain a career in this field, what skills and courses are most needed, and much more. Please bring questions!

Walk-in Hours for the Week
Kelly Kowatch (kkowatch@umich.edu)
Friday, October 22 from 2:00-3:00 p.m. - SI Student Lounge, North Quad

Emily Bowman Appointment/Walk-In Hours
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Wednesday, October 20 from Noon to 5:00 p.m. - 3360 North Quad
Friday, October 22 from Noon to 4:00 p.m. – 3360 North Quad

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

Posted by shamille on October 18, 2010 at 08:48 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] 10 Online Job Hunting Tips

Checklist: 10 Online Job Hunting Tips

Want to increase your chances of landing a great job online? LinkedIn can help you find -- and attract -- the best opportunities. Here are some tips:

1. Make time
It’s easy to let job hunting fall to the bottom of your to-do list, but you can’t afford to let that happen. Schedule at least 15 minutes a day in your calendar to work on your resume, update and check online networking profiles and search job listings. Opportunities come and go quickly, so you need to be in the game on a daily basis.

2. Get noticed
What better way to impress a recruiter than to have a professional networking profile appear as the first search result for your name? Completing your LinkedIn profile to 100% with your education, experience, recommendations and group memberships will increase your search ranking and give employers a strong impression before you ever meet in person.

3. Be keyword savvy
Make sure your profile is chock-full of keywords that will attract a recruiter’s attention. Look through job postings and LinkedIn profiles that appeal to you and incorporate some of the same words or phrases. In addition to job- and industry specific words, recruiters also love leadership terms (captain, president) and action words (managed, designed).

4. Reach out
Connect on LinkedIn with everyone you know -- friends, family, neighbors, professors, family friends, internship colleagues and others. Once you’re connected, send each person a friendly message on LinkedIn, asking if they would keep an eye out for the particular kind of job or jobs you’re seeking or if they can introduce you to other helpful contacts.

5. Spread the word
To build your credibility and stay on people’s radar screens during your job hunt, regularly update your status on LinkedIn and other social networks. You might share links to articles you think would be relevant to people in your field (to show you are up on the news), announcements about events you’re attending (to show that you are actively networking) and good career news (to show that you’re headed for success). Just remember to keep your updates clean and appropriate.

6. Get into groups
Beyond connecting to individuals, join LinkedIn groups related to your alma mater, professional associations, volunteer organizations and industries you want to join. Every discussion in which you comment is an opportunity to market yourself to people who might be hiring, and every group contains a “Jobs” tab where members post opportunities to one another.

7. Search high and low
What makes LinkedIn’s job postings different from others is that they don’t just tell you who is hiring, they tell you how you are personally connected to that company through your network. Even when you see a job listed on another site, LinkedIn can help you research people at that company and tell you how you are personally connected through your network. No matter where you look for jobs, cast a wider net by altering your search terms and location criteria from time to time.

8. Follow companies
When you see a job you like on another job board, use LinkedIn as a company research tool. Check out the LinkedIn Company Page of any organization where you’d like to work and click “Follow company.” Activities of that organization on LinkedIn (job postings, hires, announcements) will appear on your homepage and alert you to potential opportunities.

9. Persist (without pestering)
While you don’t want to be a pest, persistence is a very important component of the job search process. Sending followup messages through LinkedIn can help you stand out from other candidates. Every time you send someone a message through LinkedIn, the recruiter or hiring manager can easily click over to your profile and check out your credentials.

10. Consider Job Seeker Premium
Once you have a strong LinkedIn profile, you want to make sure it gets to the top of recruiters’ inboxes when you apply for jobs. LinkedIn offers an upgrade feature called Job Seeker Premium that, among other benefits, places your profile at the top of the list of applicants to the jobs you apply for on LinkedIn. Premium subscribers are twice as likely to be contacted by recruiters and 80% more likely to be found in search. Check it out at http://www.linkedin.com/jobseeker.

Posted by kkowatch on October 15, 2010 at 09:21 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] How to Conduct Essential Employer Research on LinkedIn

We're halfway through our How to Use LinkedIn Effectively Series. We hope that you are learning about valuable tips to aid in your successful job search!

How to Conduct Essential Employer Research on LinkedIn

One of recruiters’ biggest complaints about entry-level job candidates is their lack of knowledge about an employer’s organization. Before attending a career fair, networking meeting, or job interview, you must do your homework. Here are some tips on how to use LinkedIn to research effectively and gain an advantage over your less-prepared peers.

1. Be open to new opportunities
While you may have some idea of the company you want to work for, there are lots of opportunities at organizations you’ve never even heard of. Keep an open mind as you conduct your research and remember that the wider you expand your search, the more likely you are to find a great job.

2. Just start searching
LinkedIn’s Advanced Search is a powerful tool for job seekers like you. Simply type in any keyword -- “marketing,” “accounting,” “theater,” “baseball,” “Seattle,” India,” anything -- and you’ll see the LinkedIn profiles of people whose careers include that keyword. This is a great way to explore potential career paths and to learn about companies or job titles that might be a perfect fit for you. Save your searches to keep a record of careers and people that interest you.

3. Put yourself in good Company (Pages)
As you find employers you might want to work for, check out their LinkedIn Company Pages. Each page provides a wealth of information about an organization’s operations, employees, locations, available jobs, and more. Plus, when you visit any of the 150,000 Company Pages on LinkedIn, you’ll see how you are personally connected to people at that organization. Then you can reach out for advice or to request informational interviews and referrals to open positions. Not connected to anyone at your target company? Join a university alumni,industry, or interest group.

4. Know before you go
It’s the night before a big career fair, informational interview, or job interview and you’re feeling really nervous. Calm those jitters by using LinkedIn to research the person or people you’ll be meeting. You can discover facts about someone’s education, work experience, interests, group memberships, and connections you might have in common. This will make you feel more prepared and confident and provide you with some good conversation starters.

5. Follow the buzz
Want to keep up to the nanosecond with a particular company’s news and image? Add the LinkedIn Company Buzz application and you’ll be able to view a constant feed of everything people are saying about that organization on Twitter. This is an absolute must the night before a big job interview!

Posted by kkowatch on October 14, 2010 at 09:30 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] How to Find Your Career Passion

Day Three in our How to Use LinkedIn Effectively Series....

Checklist: How to Find Your Career Passion

Everyone tells you to “Do what you love!” It’s great advice, but what if you don’t yet know what kind of work will be most fulfilling? Check out the ways that LinkedIn can help you find your professional passion.

Search high and low
Pick absolutely anything that interests you and type that word or phrase into the “Advanced Search” box on LinkedIn. For instance, let’s say you love basketball. Just type “basketball” and your results will include the profiles of anyone on LinkedIn who mentions the sport in his or her profile. Review these profiles to discover
the professional and educational experience, skills and qualities needed to land various positions related to basketball and see if any organizations, job functions or groups in these peoples’ profiles catch your eye as potential options for you. Don’t love what you find? Try searching on a different term!

Be a joiner
You can join groups on LinkedIn related to any career interest that even vaguely appeals to you. Go ahead and explore! If you like cooking, join a group for professional chefs. If you’ve fantasized about starting your own business, join a group for entrepreneurs. Then, if you find yourself really engaged in the content, start
contributing to discussions and connecting with other members. Your interest may be an indication that this is a career path you should pursue. On the other hand, if you lose interest after receiving a few updates from a group, then that profession might not be the best choice for you.

Eavesdrop on employers
You might have a few organizations in your mind that sound like good places to work -- organizations you’ve seen around campus or heard about through your friends or family -- but you’re not sure exactly what kinds of jobs exist at that company or even what that company actually does. LinkedIn Company Pages will give you insight into any organization’s employees, divisions and types of jobs. Plus, by “following” any company on LinkedIn, you can “listen in” on their news, events, announcements and more. Company Pages provide a
window into a company’s culture as well as alerting you to available positions.

Be curious
Once you’ve explored some things you know you’re interested in, start expanding your horizons. Scan the discussions in your college’s LinkedIn Group and read about something new and different. Click on the “Jobs” tab on LinkedIn and start searching through thousands of unique possibilities. You can limit your job search to
positions within 10 miles from home or broaden it to include cities around the world. Finding job openings in Paris or Sydney is just as easy as finding a job down the street. Play around. Experiment. It’s quick, it’s easy, and it’s free. You never know what might ignite a passion.

Connect with passionate people
Look around your life for other people who share your passions -- or any passion. Just as you should connect on LinkedIn with people who share your alma mater or a past internship employer, you should also connect with people who share your personal interests or hobbies. Look for people who inspire you in groups and send them a connection request asking for a few words of wisdom. Most passionate people are happy to share their excitement about what they do.

Don’t be afraid to fail
It’s unlikely that you’ll find your passion just by sitting at your computer. You have to go out in the world and try new things. Do more volunteering, take on part-time work, sign up for a class in something you’ve never studied. Use LinkedIn to discover your passion and find opportunities, and then get out there and take action! Your path is out there, just waiting to be discovered.

Visit the Learning Center at http://learn.linkedin.com/students for more tips and advice on making the most of LinkedIn!

Posted by kkowatch on October 13, 2010 at 10:20 AM | Comments (0)

[Using LinkedIn] How to Network Professionally Online

Day Two in our How to Use LinkedIn Effectively Series....

How to Network Professionally Online

You’ve heard it a million times (so it wouldn’t hurt to hear it again): “Success is not just about what you know; it’s about
who you know.” With LinkedIn, the world’s largest professional online network, the “who” is at your fingertips. Follow these
easy steps to get connected now—and to turn those connections into opportunities.

1. 100% complete = 100% more likely to get noticed
You can’t build connections if people don’t know you exist or see what you have to offer. Your LinkedIn profile is your online business card, your resume, and your letters of rec all in one. Don’t be shy: users with complete profiles are 40 times more likely to receive opportunities through LinkedIn.

2. You’re more experienced than you think
Complete profiles are so important because the more information you provide, the more people will find reasons to connect with you. Think really broadly about all the experience you have, including summer jobs, unpaid internships, volunteer work, and student organizations. You never know what might catch someone’s eye.

3. Use your inbox
Contrary to popular belief, networking doesn’t mean reaching out to strangers. The best networks begin with those you know and trust, and then grow based on personal referrals. Start building your LinkedIn network by uploading your online address book and connecting to friends, relatives, internship colleagues, and professionals you know in the “real world.”

4. Get personal
As you build your connections on LinkedIn, always customize your connection requests with a friendly note and, if necessary, a reminder of where you met or what organization you have in common. If you’re being referred by a mutual friend, write a brief intro of who you are and why you’d like to connect. You’ll impress people with your personal touch.

5. Join the “in” crowd
Another way to form new online relationships is to join LinkedIn Groups. Start with your university group—alums love to connect with students—and then find volunteer organizations or professional associations you already belong to. As a member, you can comment on discussions, find exclusive job listings, and meet people who share common interests.

6. Lend a (virtual) hand
As you build connections and group memberships, think about what you can do to support other people. Comment on a classmate’s status update, forward a job listing that fits the criteria of a friend, or write a recommendation for a summer job colleague. You’ll find that your generosity is always rewarded (and, of course, it feels really good to help someone!).

7. Update your status #early and #often
Networking is not just about who you know; it’s about who knows you. Stay on other people’s radar screens by updating your LinkedIn status at least once a week—you can do this directly on LinkedIn or by linking your Twitter account and marking tweets with #in. Mention events you’re attending, projects you’ve completed, and other professional news.

8. Question (and answer) everything
LinkedIn’s Answers feature is a great place to seek advice from a wide variety of people all around the world. You can also show the world what you have to offer by answering people’s questions about a topic where you have some expertise. The more active you are in Answers, the more people will view your profile and want to connect with you.

9. Do your homework
Before an informational interview, a job interview, or a networking get-together, use LinkedIn to learn about the background and interests of the people you’re scheduled to meet. Access Company Pages to research organizations and their employees, and use Advanced Search to find things you have in common with people you’re meeting.

10. Now step away from the computer...
There’s a perception that young people are only comfortable communicating online, so be sure to support your online networking with real human contact. Set up phone calls, attend live events, and send snail mail notes to people you interact with on LinkedIn. Remember that online methods should supplement, not replace, in-person relationship-building.

Posted by kkowatch on October 12, 2010 at 09:47 AM | Comments (0)

Job Search and Recruiting Tips from an UMSI Alum

Every now and then, we'll get some words of advice from an alumnus who is out in the field. I always ask if we can share this, and of course, they always agree as they want their knowledge and experience and tips shared to help everyone. See below for some tips that this alumnus thought would be helpful based on several conversations that have been had with SI students over the past few years:

1. Female students don't seem to be familiar with the Grace Hopper Conference going on right now in Atlanta. From previous students I've heard that it was a very important place to make connections and I know a few people that actually got jobs from there.

2. Conferences in general don't seem to be high on students' list of priorities. There is usually a way to attend for a reduced price or for free through volunteer or stipend opportunities and that students should explore these options so that they can attend conferences, which are usually a great networking opportunity.

3. Almost every student that I've talked to indicated to be interested in developing for mobile devices. This is great, but I want to make sure that they are aware that they will be joining a pool of already very talented people when they come fresh from college. Being familiar with design for mobile is expected, but it does not mean they will be working on iphone/android/ipad apps all day right from the start. I think it's important to know that having worked on a mobile app for a class project and owning an iphone (yes, I had this comment) will not be enough. I also want to make sure that students don't specialize themselves too much for the job world by focusing on mobile design, since there is already a very big group of people working on these products and the experience of a 2-year grad program won't prepare them enough for this niche. They need to make sure to also have some presentable work for "web" projects.

4. Quite a few people are still undecided about research versus interaction design which I understand but at large internet companies like Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, and Apple, these positions rarely overlap. Students need to know the difference and pursue opportunities that will provide them with the relevant experience for these separate, but related fields. Check out these links to get a general idea of the differences:
User Experience Research
User Experience Design
Interaction Design

I also think that students mix up the role of a UX designer with a specific job description. Most of the times UX design is the practice within a company that has a UX department along with engineering and project management. User Researcher and Interaction Designers can both be User Experience Designers.

5. When students talk to employers they should make sure to at least know one or a few products from that employer. Even if it's just to start a conversation. I am pretty surprised that many students did not know anything about what we do at my company, one of the largest internet firms in the world. I also had a student respond "I'm not that big of a fan of {your company}", which is not the best statement in any situation of job searching.

Posted by kkowatch on October 04, 2010 at 10:50 AM | Comments (0)

This Week at SI-CDO - Tuesday, September 14, 2010

In this Edition:
About Us (Staff Profiles)
Meet the new SI Career Development Office Graduate Assistant
CDO Walk-in Hours This Week!
iTrack Updates & Announcements
RSVP for upcoming events

About Us
Joanna Kroll - Sr. Associate Director of Career Development
• Over 13 years working in Career Development - 10 years at SI
• Hold a Bachelors degree in Psychology from Central Michigan University and Masters degree in Counseling from Wayne State University
• I primarily work with 2nd year SI students on their job search and career development needs
• I am the co-author of the book The New Information Professional: Your Guide to Careers in the Digital Age
• Fun facts: I have 2 boys - Nick 7 and Jack 5, along with a cute dog, Shelby. I live in the quaint community of Plymouth. I love to read (but never have enough time with 2 boys and a dog - and husband), and attend professional sporting events. Golf and running are hobbies of mine - wish I had more time to do both! I am a bit of a pop culture junkie as well. I love being a career counselor and working with students, but a career in entertainment reporting would have been another good fit for me.
• Most unique job: I was a janitor at my high school for one summer during college.
• Feel free to check out my LinkedIn profile for more information http://www.linkedin.com/in/

Kelly Kowatch - Assistant Director of Career Development
• Over 7 years working in Career Development in four different career services offices; I’ve been at SI for almost 4 years
• My degrees are a Bachelor of Arts in Policy and Applied Economics from Michigan State University and a Master of Arts in Higher Education and Student Affairs from The Ohio State University
• I primarily work with 1st year SI students on their internship search and career development needs and plan ASB and coordinate international activities at SI
• I am (also) the co-author of the book The New Information Professional: Your Guide to Careers in the Digital Age
• Fun facts: I have 2 cats and live in Ypsilanti. I love to take classes on everything and anything (currently in German), read anything and everything, and I am constantly renovating my house. I am an avid traveler and have been to over 25 countries and 45 US States and received a Fulbright Award in 2009.
• Most unique job: I was a “Bob” (think Office Space) for the State of Ohio when I was a Performance Auditor. I like helping people find jobs now so much more!
• Feel free to check out my LinkedIn profile for more information http://www.linkedin.com/in/kellykowatch

Shamille Orr - Career Development Assistant
• Over 3 years working in Higher Education - 2 years at SI
• Hold a Bachelors degree in Business from Western Michigan University
• I provide administrative support for the Career Development Office and work with all students on their various needs (from overrides to iTrack access)
• Fun facts: I lived in Ann Arbor for 13 years and graduated from Pioneer High School - directly across from the football stadium. I live in Ypsilanti (1.2 miles from my parents) and I love spending time with my family and friends!
• Most unique job: I was a party hostess at a place similar to Chuck E. Cheese - this is where I learned how to make cotton candy!
• Feel free to check out my LinkedIn profile for more information http://www.linkedin.com/in/shamilleorr

Meet the new SI Career Development Office Graduate Assistant
The SI Career Development Office has hired a current MSI student, Emily Bowman, to assist in student advising appointments and the coordination of career development events and other special projects. Emily has a background in student affairs and a M.Ed in College Student Personnel Administration from the University of West Florida.

Emily will be holding office hours next Wednesday from Noon to 4pm and Friday from Noon to 3:30pm. If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

CDO Walk-in Hours This Week!
Joanna Kroll (jckroll@umich.edu)
Tuesday, September 14 from 1:00-2:00—3360 North Quad
Thursday, September 16 from 11:00-12:00—SI Student Lounge, North Quad

Kelly Kowatch (kkowatch@umich.edu)
Wednesday, September 15 from 9:00 – 10:00am – 3360 North Quad
Friday, September 17 from 10:30 – 11:30am – SI Student Lounge, North Quad

Emily Bowman Appointment/Walk-In Hours Next Week
If you have general career development questions, need assistance with your part-time job search, or would like your resume reviewed, you can make an appointment with Emily Bowman by emailing her at embow@umich.edu. Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Wednesday, September 15 from Noon to 4pm – 3360 North Quad
Friday, September 17 from Noon to 3:30pm – 3360 North Quad
Students who schedule appointments will be given first priority but walk-ins are welcome.

Walk-in appointments are meant to answer your quick 10-minutes or less questions. If you need a longer counseling session, please make an appointment by emailing si.careers@umich.edu.

iTrack Updates & Announcements
REGISTER on iTrack today to SEARCH for part-time jobs, internships, and full-time jobs!

UPLOAD your resume to iTrack to apply to jobs through the system AND to make your resume accessible to employers!

UPDATE your resume on iTrack - it’s time to add your summer internship experience to your resume!

SI Resume Book - if you want your resume included in the all SI Resume Book that we send out to employers, please update your resume by Sept 30th in iTrack. We will NOT include resumes that have not been updated in the past 6 months.

Are you new to iTrack and would like a brief tutorial to get started (or you just have questions)? No problem, simply contact si.careers@umich.edu to set up a 15 minute tutorial session.

International Internship Search Workshop
Noon-1 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 17
2255 North Quad

In this workshop, gain tips, advice, and access to resources to guide your international internship search. Because international internships can be more difficult to secure and funding opportunity deadlines are early, it’s best to get an early start on this search.

RSVP for upcoming events:
We are offering many workshops and programs this semester to help arm you with the toolkit to successfully navigate through your internship or job search. Below are just a few of them. For a comprehensive list of all of our events this semester, view the iTrack calendar of events—and sign-up. Don’t worry… if you can’t attend a workshop, we will make most of the information available on our website—or just make an appointment to get the information. Watch for publicity!

• Sep 21 Job Search Resources and Networking Tips
• Sep 23 Yahoo! Presentation
• Sep 24 Resume Writing Workshop
• Sep 27 Sapient Presentation
• Sep 28 Menlo Innovations Presentation
• Sep 28 Google Presentation
• Sep 29 ISKME Presentation
• Sep 29 Career Exploration Information
• Sep 30 Cover Letter Writing Workshop

Posted by shamille on September 14, 2010 at 11:14 AM | Comments (0)

Like it or Not, Social Networking is Effective For Your Job Search

Social Networking Your Way to a New Job
By FARHAD MANJOO
Job hunters must learn to navigate the social protocol of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social networking sites.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/26/education/26SOCIAL.html?_r=1&emc=eta1

Posted by jckroll on August 30, 2010 at 02:45 PM | Comments (0)

$2000 CIC Stipend Available for Community Informatics Related Internships

2010 CIC Internship Stipend
A $2,000 stipend will be awarded to a student who has self-identified an unpaid or low paying CI/CIC-related internship opportunity.

CIC Stipend Requirements:

The Community Informatics (CI) stipend of $2,000 is offered to any SI student specializing in Community Informatics or actively involved in the Community Information Corps (CIC) who is interested in this PEP internship.
Internship MUST approved for PEP credit.
Internship MUST be a full-time spring/summer internship that is at least 360 hours.

Application:
To apply for this stipend please send a 1-3 page single spaced statement of interest to Joanna Kroll, the Senior Associate Director of Career Development, and Dan Atkins, the Kellogg Professor of Community Informatics stating:
1) Why you are interested in this internship;
2) How it fits into your academic plans at the School of Information and how it supports your goals toward gaining a Community Informatics specialization;
3) How you have been involved in the CIC or the CI specialization and how this professional experience can be beneficial to CI or the CIC upon your return;
4) How this internship matches your professional goals.

Please submit this statement of interest to Joanna Kroll at jckroll@umich.edu and Dan Atkins at atkins@umich.edu at the same time you apply for this internship. If you receive this PEP internship and the CI stipend you may be asked to write a short summary report of your experiences to the Community Informatics chair or make a short presentation to the CIC upon your return.

Deadline: Friday, June 4, 2010

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS FUNDING APPLICATION IS SEPARATE FROM THE JOB APPLICATION. YOU WILL RECEIVE THE STIPEND IF YOU ARE HIRED FOR THE INTERNSHIP AND ARE SELECTED BY DAN ATKINS FOR MEETING THE CIC FUNDING CRITERIA.

Posted by kkowatch on May 21, 2010 at 09:27 AM | Comments (0)

SI Career Development Resume & CV Book Campaign

Need a little extra help in your job or internship search? The Career Development Office is starting a Resume Book Campaign to send resume books to a targeted group of employers in iTrack in less than two weeks. Your resume will be sent to hundreds of employers in our database!

If you want to include your resume in this campaign, YOU MUST ADD IT to the one of the Resume Books In iTrack by Friday, April 9th. You will be able to select which resume book that you would like to include it in by industry-area only.

Please save your resume in the following format: LastName/Specialization/Internship or FT Job.

You must also add an Objective Statement to the top of your resume (since a cover letter will not be included). Keep it short and concise, and indicate if you are looking for an internship or a full-time job. Your objective will also have to be somewhat generic and targeted to industry, rather than a specific job. Including a job title would be okay, but make sure not to limit yourself in this effort.

Examples:

Objective: To obtain a Summer 2010 internship in the area of User Experience Research

Objective: To obtain a full-time professional Library position in a public or academic library setting

For PhD students who are on the job market now or in the coming year, we will be asking faculty to send the PhD CV books to their contacts at universities and in industry nationwide.

Our staff realize that many of your might want to have your resume reviewed before submitting it. That’s fine, but if we have already reviewed your resume, please just go ahead and submit it. We are happy to review the resumes of students we haven’t seen before. We will be holding office hours next week specifically for short Resume Review Consultations. We will have sign-up sheets available on our doors starting for timeslots from Monday through Friday. The sign-ups will go up on Monday. Please, do not wait until the last minute as we will not be able to review resumes on April 9th in order to meet the deadline.

For help with your resume, please refer to the Resume and Cover Letter Guidebook online http://www.si.umich.edu/careers/docs/SI_Career_Resume_CL_Guide.pdf

For help with your CV, please contact our office for advice, resources and CV samples at si.careers@umich.edu

Resume Submission Instructions:
In order to submit your resume, login to iTrack at http://www.si.umich.edu/careers/students.htm

Upload a resume:
• Click on Documents
• Click on +Add New
• Please save your resume in the following format: LastName/Specialization/Internship or FT Job.

If you have not previously added a resume to iTrack, you may need to wait up to three business days to have your resume approved.
If you have a previously approved resume on iTrack at this time, your resume will be added and accessible immediately.

To add your approved resume to a Resume Book:
• Click on Documents
• Click on the Opt-In Resume Book tab
• To the right of the resume that you want to add to the resume book, click on “Select Resume Books”
• Select the resume book that you would like your resume to be added to by checking the appropriate box
• Click Submit

If you have any questions, contact us at si.careers@umich.edu

Posted by kkowatch on April 05, 2010 at 01:06 PM | Comments (0)

We are on Facebook Now!

Actually, we've been on Facebook for a couple years now -- BUT, I just learned of this cool new app on Facebook that allows you to directly post your Blog feed to Facebook! So now, every blog post we write will automatically be added to the SI Career Development Facebook page! Check it out!

http://apps.facebook.com/rssgraffiti/?fb_dash_section=my_recent

Posted by kkowatch on March 15, 2010 at 10:14 AM | Comments (0)

This Month at The Career Center for Graduate Students - March 2010

Much of your career success depends on finding the right resources, and The Career Center can help. This Month for Graduate Students for March features several resources that can make a critical difference in your career decision-making and job search process. Because much of this process is individual, you may want to take advantage of a career counseling appointment to dig into the specifics of your situation. As part of our career counseling service, we also offer career assessment tools or "tests" to help you explore your options and make career decisions. Career counseling is a great opportunity to explore the unique aspects of your situation with a member of our graduate student team. We also understand the value of networking for your job search. Use This Month to get started with your network, and learn about the tools that can help you be successful.

Visit This Month at: http://careercenter.umich.edu/students/gradservices/thismonth/index.html

Posted by kkowatch on March 08, 2010 at 04:36 PM | Comments (0)

The Debate Over Objective Statements

In general, I recommend not using an objective statement on a resume. This is for a variety of reasons... for one, if you are going to write a cover letter, which I do recommend, you can say everything that an objective is supposed to say in an entire page rather than one or two line. Also, in general, objective statements are badly written, and because you rarely know your audience, its hard to tailor an objective to their exact preferences. I also believe that those precious two or three lines can be better used to sell yourself through your experiences and education, etc.

The only time I do recommend an objective is when you are going to an event or a conference where there is a chance that you may be handing out your resume to strangers in an impromptu fashion. Because of this, you need to give the recipient some sort of idea of what it is that you are seeking, because when they get back to their office and finally go through that stack of papers that they collected at the conference week later, they just might not remember the details of your conversation. The other situation in which an objective statement may be useful is when your resume is rather general or your experiences are scattered and you need to give definition to what it is that you are seeking (because your experiences don't explain it themselves.)

However, if you do choose to include an objective statement, make it short, concise and about what you can do for the organization -- not what the position will do for you.

Pretty Good example: Inquisitive, data-oriented Master of Science in Information candidate seeking User Experience Research position at Google

Bad example: Seeking a position as User Experience Research Intern in order to gain experience and knowledge and lets me utilize my background in statistical analysis.

On LinkedIn (in one of my groups), there's a discussion going on about Objective Statements. I've included the questions and responses that have been included for you to read. Note that this is from a group of Career Services professionals (and some other certified resume consultants) who work at a wide range of universities. Note that people are all over the board on this one -- so you may need to make up your mind on your own. I've bolded the ones that I think are most useful -- however, you decide for yourself!

Question: Objective Statements--are people still suggesting them for entry level resumes? If not, what do you recommend? Does it vary any by discipline?

Responses:

I still recommend them, but I stress to the students the fact that objectives hold only two purposes---to proclaim what position you're seeking and how you're going to use your assets to benefit the company, not yourself. The employer needs to know what you plan to do for them and/or why they should hire you over someone else.

--

I tell my students that it is optional and that depends on each situation/resume. For example, if a student is sending a resume into an employer with a cover letter, no objective is really needed. Meanwhile, it may useful at a career fair since the cover letter is not provided to the employer.

If a student does include it, I tell them that it should state the actual position title PLUS 2-3 strong skills they have which are relevant to the position. So, the student now has made the objective part of their selling point.

For me, the objective, like the reference category, is a filler on a resume. It doesn't kill a resume from being considered yet, if worked right, can be a reason why the employer keeps reading your resume.

--

My philosophy has always been that anyone who has more than a handful of resumes to go through is going to 'yadda yadda yadda' objective statements and so even the how you're going to benefit the employer doesn't get read until they've already decided they like the candidate at which point it might help a little but you've probably already gotten to the interview pile at that point and the interview is what will make or break you. For on campus/career fair/etc. use I still advocate using them but only to communicate the most bare bones information: i.e., full-time vs. internship + field/industry/whatever.

--

I strongly recommend objective statements to all undergraduate and graduate students and alumni. An objective should contain the job title and job ID (if any) of the position they are applying for. In this economy with recruiters stretched to the limit, candidates have an extremely short amount of time to get an employer’s attention. If a candidate doesn’t have objective statement in the resume but has their intentions in a cover letter, they mustn’t assume the employer takes the time to read cover letters during the initial recruitment process.

--

I still advise students to compose an objective that identifies the position they seek and two to three skills they will bring to the employer. If they've done their research, those skills will be consistent with the keywords the employer scans for in an ATS. Just this past week I encountered employers who validated the value of a well-written objective. In some situations, it may be the only place those all important keywords are included.

--

I believe that an objective varies on the degree and position a graduate holds. For instance, if they are applying for a position as a medical assistant, and that is the degree they hold, then I say no, an objective is not needed because the office manager, DON, etc already knows that is why a medical assistant is applying for the position.

For graduates where have a broader range in their field, such as Criminal Justice or Computer Networking, then I do suggest an objective because with these degrees, there are so many different positions you can apply for. Example of what I suggest for an objective for these situations:

Recent Criminal Justice graduate seeking a position as a parole officer to bring to your organization enthusiasm, dedication, responsibility, and good work ethic, combined with a desire to utilize my skills obtained through experience in the following areas: (then start your resume listing your skills and experience)

When going through the exit interview process with our students, this is when I get a good feel as to where the student/graduate is in knowing (or not knowing) what direction they are leaning towards in starting their new career. This also plays a big part in having an objective or not on their resume.

--

This would be a better question for employers to answer than us career services folks. We are making assumptions about what employers want.. but what do they really want to see? What is helpful to them?

We recommend objectives to our students for a couple of reasons:

1) Employers do not have a lot of time to interpret a resume and try to figure out what kind of position the candidate is seeking. Therefore, if they don't know ahead of time (i.e. through an objective), they may be unwilling to read the resume at all since they can't tell if it will be worth their time. In this case, Christian's "bare bones" approach could be helpful so employers at least know that they have the kind of position the candidate seeks.

2) An Objective is one way for a student to show that their job search is focused and that they're not just shotgun blasting a generic resume to every company. Students who know their passions can typically write a fairly effective resume.

Employers have not spoken to us directly about Objectives recently, but they have told us that generic traits (e.g. hard working) do not help them much. They prefer more tangible information, which is not always easy for students to identify.

--

Employers would probably have as many varied answers as us Career Services folks have now. And because Career Services departments work so closely with employers, I think we can all speak intelligently on the matter without making assumptions. On a side note, just because a person has a degree in a certain field does not mean that what they're looking for is as broad as the degree. For example, a person with a medical assisting degree may prefer to solely focus on phlebotomy instead of the operations of the entire doctor's office or hospital. Or a paralegal may want to work within a specific area of specialization. Any way the graduate can save the employers time and guesswork would surely work to their advantage, in my opinion.

--

Objective statements shouldn't be used on any resume, no matter the career level.

An objective statement is telling the hiring manager what the candidate wants. The hiring manager doesn't care what the candidate wants. They want to know if the candidate can positively impact their company's bottom line.

For the candidate to prove that they can, they need to include an opening summary that dovetails past experience/academics to the requirements of the targeted job. One - or preferably two - quantified accomplishments should be included.


I'd have to disagree with xxx on using an objective. I think that having an objective on a resume is like having the cover from the box a jigsaw puzzle came in. The puzzle solver is faced with many seemingly random pieces to assemble; the box cover depicts what the puzzle will look like when it is successfully put together. That picture gives the assembler lots of clues about how to put the pieces together...and that is exactly what one wants a resume reader to be able to do easily. Obviously, if a resume's entries lead down a clear path to an easily apparent outcome, then I would not suggest using an objective: the reader will quickly ascertain exactly what the job seeker is looking for. But for the resume of someone with a diverse background, or who is trying to change fields, having an objective can help the resume reader make sense of seemingly disparate experiences.

I have learned not to assume that all resume readers are creative problem solvers. Some are, and they will figure out how the pieces come together, objective or no. But for readers who are not good at that sort of visioning (or for those who are simply trying to move through resumes quickly), giving them a sense of how all the resume components come together helps set them up to read the resume more easily and to come to the conclusion the writer was aiming for.

--

In response to xx's statement: Again, objectives tell hiring managers what you want. They don't care. They want to know what you can bring to their company. Your opening summary should tell them that.

If you're in a transitional career, within the opening summary it's perfectly all right to write something like: Transitioning from retail management to accounting, with a degree from ABC University and an internship at XYZ company. That's the objective without it being stated directly on the resume and more importantly with it telling the hiring manager about your background, not your desires, wishes, expectations. Another way to get around it is to use a tag line (a title) at the beginning of the summary to let the hiring manager know what position you're targeting (eg: Accounting Manager, Real Estate Broker, etc. etc.)

There are many ways to get an objective into the opening summary without it being obtrusive or making it sound like - this is what I want. Skilled resume writers do this all the time.

--

Actually, xx, I don't think that telling hiring managers what they want to know and using an objective poses a conflict if the resume is well constructed and strategic in its language. In any marketing effort---and a resume is a marketing document---the goal is to make the reader want to find out more. That's the first step in making the sale. Resume readers are customers to whom job seekers are marketing. Of course hiring managers are looking for folks who can do what they need; it's the job of the job seeker to create a resume that addresses that need. But, as I noted before, resume readers should not have to search around to find the relevant background in the resume---and, in fact, they won't. A strategically worded objective can be the first step in convincing a hiring manager that the candidate understands the needs of the position AND that (s)he is qualified to deliver. I would never suggest an objective be framed as what the candidate wants. It is all about what the employer wants, and then connecting the dots between those needs and the candidate's capabilities and experience. For those whose job titles don't make that connection obvious, an objective can provide a valuable opportunity to grab the attention of a hiring manager by making the connections---and the ability of the candidate to deliver the goods---easy to spot.

--

XX - of course a resume is a marketing document. That's the first thing any competent resume writer learns. And, of course, no resume writer would force a hiring manager to look for pertinent data, because most only afford 7 seconds or less to each resume - unless they're compelled to read further. You compel them to read further by stating what you can do for their company (including listing one or two quantified, recent, relevant accomplishments in the summary), not telling them what you want.

By its very nature, an objective is what the candidate wants. If a candidate is applying for an accounting position, why write: "Objective: An accounting position with your company." Why not put the tag: "Accountant". One word takes the place of seven. Anyone reading that title knows the individual is applying for an accounting position. It's self-explanatory.

As I stated previously, there are elegant, less obvious ways to get an objective into an opening summary. It's done everyday by professional resume writers. It's also industry standard.

--

I personally allow the students to decide if they want to list an objective on their resume. To me listing an objective is tailoring your resume "old school" and not up to the modern expectations of what your resume should state. I tell them if they love the objective portion, then by all means keep it on there because they have to be confident in how they are marketing themselves. As an alternative to an objective I recommend they replace it with a Professional Profile, Summary of Qualifications, or something of the like. If they chose to list an objective I coach them that it needs to state what they offer not what they gain to seek. For example, "To become a .... with your company" or any similar objective is a waste of space and obvious since that is probably the position they just applied to - hence their objective to gain employment in that position. Instead that statement should be reworded to offer something of interest to an employer "Skilled medical professional with over 10 years experience providing quality service eager to positively impact your practice."

--

Yes, I advise my college students to use an objective. It should be short and to the point and should include the position & 3-5 skills from the job description. Such as "Accountant position using my skills in Quickbooks, Data Analysis, and Tax Preparation." The dozens of employers I have spoken to like this type of objective, especially for entry level persons. Yes, an objective is what the job seeker wants so the job seeker should use the objective to show that he / she meets the needs of the employer. Marketing is stating that I have what you need.

--

We've started recommending that students add an objective to their resume if they will not be including a cover letter. For instance, we provide resume books to employers, and the objective gives an insight as to what the student is interested in. From the College Recruiting and Career Services perspective, this still seems to be important to employers. Especially those who are alumni.

--

Great advice, xx. An objective is a very important component of a resume. As I tell students, its primary purpose is to target the position for which you are applying. It tells the reader that you want the position they have available. Unfortunately, this can't be assumed. Objectives should not be wordy and full of fluff that mean nothing to the reader. They should be as direct and specific as possible.

--

I typically suggest students add an objective statement at the top of their resume. However, as with most other aspects of resume writing, I like to lay out the pros and cons and let the applicant decide what is best for them. I'm not certain there are ever any definites in resume writing--other than we all seem to definitely have opinions. If nothing else, when working with those with little job experience or who are writing their first resume, I find the process of having them at least develop an objective they could use to be a helpful exercise in developing the rest of the resume to target a specific field of work.

--

Like many others who responded, I recommend a concise objective that clearly states what position the applicant is trying to obtain. This was validated at a recent event our career services office hosted, where we informally posed the question to an audience of approximately 40 employers. Almost all responded that they did in fact like to see an objective IF it was concise and specific (and did not include what I refer to as "the fluff" such as "to contribute to a meaningful and worthwhile workplace, blah, blah, blah...")

Posted by kkowatch on March 03, 2010 at 09:21 AM | Comments (0)

Check out the new Global Michigan Portal Website

This week the University launched a new web portal called Global Michigan. This portal will help students more easily access opportunities abroad, and help students from other countries to find their way here. The site also houses a new online magazine, Explore, which showcases the University's global impact and resources. This magazine will highlight the University's global activities and student experiences.

Explore may repurpose articles written for other University publications, or examine new topics. We will strive to include a cross-section of disciplines and geographic areas in each update. Please keep this new venue in mind for your international stories. The editor is Amy Whitesall, and she may be contacted at amy.whitesall@gmail.com

New features will be added regularly, including student blogs and photographs. Eventually we hope to provide links and information about faculty research abroad. Meanwhile, please take a look at the site and enjoy:

Global Michigan, http://www.globalportal.umich.edu

See the Record’s article about Global Michigan: http://www.ur.umich.edu/update/archives/100216/global

Posted by kkowatch on February 21, 2010 at 08:17 PM | Comments (0)

Seeking Funding for A Community Based Media Project?

Have an idea for informing your community?

Submit it to the Knight Community Information Challenge, a matching grant program that helps community and place-based foundations find creative ways to fund media projects that inform and engage residents about pressing issues.

Community Information Challenge

Have an idea? The Community Information Challenge is open through March 8.

The Knight Community Information Challenge is a five-year, $24 million initiative to help place-based foundations find creative ways to use new media and technology to keep residents informed and engaged.

A matching grant program, the challenge is premised on two strongly held beliefs: 1) in a democracy, information is essential for a community to function properly, it is a core community need; 2) since community foundations are formed to meet core community needs, they are logical partners in meeting the information needs of communities.

The challenge is part of Knight Foundation's Media Innovation Initiative, a multi-faceted effort that includes projects to reform national media policy, increase broadband access nationally and transform journalism education, among addressing other issues.

Three Rules

There are three simple rules for this contest: Applicants must be U.S. community or place-based foundations (though community partners are welcome); projects have to meet a local information need; and foundations must match Knight's investment.

For more information on the challenge, read our Frequently Asked Questions.

Applications are short -- Apply Now!

Posted by kkowatch on February 19, 2010 at 11:18 AM | Comments (0)

More Funding Resources for International Opportunities

Here’s a list of some of the main international funding opportunities available to U-M students. We (including our graduate peer advisors) may also be able to assist you with strategies for finding internships abroad. Let us know if you have any questions.

Bill Nolting and Kelly Nelson, U-M International Center, icoverseas@umich.edu, tel. 647-2299, http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt

Winter 2010 Deadlines for U-M funding sources to support graduate/professional overseas internships, research & study.

See these overview websites:
• International Institute’s Graduate Fellowships page, http://www.ii.umich.edu/ii/funding/gradstud
• For Rackham awards see: http://www.rackham.umich.edu/financial_assistance/
• International Center’s funding site (with tips for writing funding proposals and presentation), http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt/work/internfunding.html
LISTED IN ORDER OF DEADLINES:
• Thursday, Jan. 28, NSEP Boren Graduate Fellowships, http://www.borenawards.org/boren_fellowship
• Monday, Feb. 1, Rackham International Research Awards, http://rackham.helpserve.com/index.php?_m=knowledgebase&_a=viewarticle&kbarticleid=27&nav=0,2
• Monday, Feb. 1, Center for Chinese Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/ccs/academics/fellowshipsandgrants
• Monday, Feb. 1, Center for Japanese Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/cjs/academics/fundstudents
• Monday, Feb. 1, Foreign Language & Area Studies Fellowships (FLAS), http://www.ii.umich.edu/ii/funding/gradstud (Scroll down for FLAS information)
• Monday, Feb. 1, Foreign Language Enhancement Program (FLEP), http://www.cic.net/Home/Projects/SharedCourses/FLEP/Introduction.aspx
• To be announced in January or February: Nonprofit & Public Management Center’s Self-Directed Internship grants for students in the Schools of Business, Public Policy and Social Work: http://nonprofit.umich.edu/students/fsppssw_internship_support.php
• Monday, Feb. 15, International Internship Individual Fellowships (for all continuing students), 100+ awards annually—check with the I.I. for additional funding sources such as Fulbright-Hays, http://www.ii.umich.edu/ii/funding
• Tuesday, Feb. 16, African Initiative Grant, http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/caas/as/index.html
• Monday, Feb. 22, Ginsberg Center’s Wallenberg Fellowship for Community Service Abroad, http://ginsberg.umich.edu/resources/for_students.html#fellowships
• Monday, March 15, Center for European Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/ces-euc/academics/opportunity
• Monday, March 15, Center for Russian & East European Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/crees/academics/studentfund
• Monday, March 15, Center for Korean Studies, SeAH-Haiam Arts and Science Scholarship, http://ii.umich.edu/cks/academics/fellowshipsandgrants/seah
• Wednesday, March 17, Center for International & Comparative Studies Research Fellowship, http://www.ii.umich.edu/UMICH/cics/Home/Funding%20Opportunities/Student%20Research%20Fellowships%20CALL%202010.pdf
• Soon to be announced!--TBA: College of Engineering Fellowships for Internships Abroad (for COE students only)-http://www.engin.umich.edu/ipe/workabroad/index.html

Check with other Area Studies Centers in the International Institute for additional funding sources:
• Center for Korean Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/cks/academics/fellowshipsandgrants/studentfunding
• Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/lacs (Click on Academics, Graduate Students, and then Fellowships & Grants)
• Center for Middle Eastern & North African Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/cmenas/academics/opportunities
• Center for South Asian Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/csas/academics/funding
• Center for Southeast Asian Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/cseas/resources/fundopp
• Center for World Performance Studies, http://www.ii.umich.edu/umich/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=e0c5d177fe282110VgnVCM10000096b1d38dRCRD

Posted by kkowatch on January 08, 2010 at 05:56 PM | Comments (0)

Be a Good Networker and Get SI Business Cards!

To help SI students represent themselves and represent SI in a variety of settings, and in response to student requests, we are offering SI students (MSI and Ph.D.) a set of 100 free business cards with the SI logo and block M, and personalized with individual student names etc. SI students assisted with the card design and the design has been approved by the University.

For those of you who ordered cards in a previous semester and still have plenty, please use the cards you have rather than order more. If you ordered last year and have used most of your cards, it’s fine to order again.


In order to keep the cost down and thus allow for providing free cards to all students who request them, we must order the cards in a single batch. Thus, only students who submit the request form by 3pm on Monday, November 30 will be included in the order. Don’t delay – get your order in soon!

We are not able to process individual or small group requests after the deadline. We will send TWO reminders after this email to help you meet the deadline.

You can access the request form via the SI intranet (login with your uniqname and kerberos password) at:
https://www.si.umich.edu/intranet/students/bus_cards.htm

Remember, submit your request by 3PM ON Monday, November 30.

We will send an email to those who request the cards with details on when the cards will be ready and where to pick them up.

We hope you will enjoy using these cards at conferences, interviews, etc. as well as giving them to prospective students or professionals who may be able to refer students to our program or who may want to recruit SI students for internships or jobs.

And, for more information, I pulled this from emails that were being sent around SI...

To:
Subject: re: business cards

The SI business card has a space that allows you to put a personal website.

If you don't currently have a personal website but *know* you're going to create one eventually and want to host it on Michigan's website, visit this page: http://www.umich.edu/~umweb/how-to/homepage.html

Your url will eventually be http://www-personal.umich.edu/~youruniqname/

From Dennis Hogan, SI Computing...
I Just wanted to clarify some things about business cards and your personal webspace options:

-The SI business cards that Laura originally e-mailed about are only for students,not faculty or staff.

- There are two options for personal websites for SI students, both of which are available by default and don’t cost you anything, although they do require some configuration:

1. The ITS (formerly ITCS) option, as referenced below by Stephen. This option is provided completely by ITS and has your website files served out of your IFS space (also provided by ITS). This gives you a URL like this: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~youruniqname/

This option is limited to XHTML and CSS, and doesn’t allow for more advanced web capabilities, like PHP.

2. SI People server: This is provided by SI Computing and gives you much more advanced webpage serving capabilities. Your URL for this service is something like: http://youruniqname.people.si.umich.edu/

More information on this second option is at: http://www.si.umich.edu/computing/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=154&Itemid=25

Posted by kkowatch on November 19, 2009 at 12:24 PM | Comments (0)

Follow SI Careers and Others on Twitter

The SI Career Development Office is on Twitter -- we've got 186 followers and we want more! And, we want to hear from you about what you want to see us Twitter about!

Check us out at @si_careers

There are many, many other career oriented Tweeters out there too that you can follow:
1. @LinkedInExpert: As part of a generation that grew up with technology why not use it to find a job? This feed will give you advice on how to make the most of LinkedIn in your job search.
2. @resumeservice: Through this feed you can get some great advice on creating a resume that’s sure to impress.
3. @AlisonDoyle: This tweeter is a job search and career expert who can help give you some much-needed advice on finding the job you want.
4. @careerchatter: Get some free career coaching and advice from this feed.
5. @sweetcareers: Grace Kutney offers some great advice here for college students who are just entering the job market.
6. @EntryLevelJob: This feed will keep you up-to-date on some of the latest job postings for entry level positions.
7. @rockthejob: Check out this feed to learn how social media will impact your job search and the way you’ll work in the modern world.
8. @GradtoGreat: Learn how to take the skills you learned in college and translate them into the job you want through this feed.
9. @leaddawg: Here, college students and their parents will get tips and advice on education and the post-graduation job search process.
10. @buddingup: This feed is all about helping new grads find entry-level positions in the US and Canada.

Source

Posted by kkowatch on October 15, 2009 at 11:14 AM | Comments (0)

Student Opportunities and Resources from Ann Arbor Spark

From Ann Arbor Spark...

We continue to get very strong website traffic to our student resources portal, known as College Connections, which includes a list of over 200 companies that regularly hire new college graduates. Please add the information below to your student career development websites. Also, be sure to have your students and graduates watch the many small, emerging tech-based companies in Michigan. The best way to learn more about these companies (and who is hiring) is to check out SPARK's Career Services at http://annarborusatalent.org/, where they can view job postings and subscribe to our weekly Talent Search newsletter which features many cool, growing companies.

Call for College Graduates from Saras America, Inc.
Here is a company that is looking to hire several college graduates over the next year. Saras America, Inc. (Farmington Hills, MI) is an information technology firm that is focused on providing exceptional service using cutting edge technologies to serve their clientele. They are looking to add new members to their team in the following areas:

Account Managers
Business Development Managers
IT Consultants (must have completed a Masters Degree program)
Technical Recruiters

If your students are interested in a career in information technology, please contact them to discuss the opportunities in greater detail. Saras America, Inc., 38345 W 10 Mile Rd. Suite 300, Farmington Hills, MI 48335, (248) 489.8484, E-mail: steveS@sarasamerica.com.

November 6, 2009
The Michigan Collegiate Job Fair, Livon
ia

The Michigan Collegiate Job Fair is sponsored by Eastern Michigan University and Michigan Association of Colleges and Employers.

News of Note about the Fair:
• Gain valuable networking experience as you learn about companies and their job opportunities
• Some employers perform on-site interviews
• A list of participating employers is available at Employer List for MCJF 2009
• Bring plenty of resumes

Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Location: 27777 Schoolcraft Road, Burton Manor, Livonia, Michigan
Register online at www.mcjf.org; $10.00 registration fee (by midnight October 30)
Michigan Collegiate Job Fair 2009

Career Services for Job Seekers - Career Services at Ann Arbor SPARK
Looking for a job? Check out these categories to find a new and exciting opportunity, and then send a resume and cover letter to the email listed in the summary.

• Michigan Works! Postings
• InternInMichigan Portal
• Senior Management
• Early Start-ups
• Life Science
• Sales, Marketing & Business Development
• Professional & Administrative
• IT & Software Engineering / Development
• Engineering (non-software)
• Contract / Consulting

You can also Create a profile which will allow you to receive our weekly Talent Search newsletter and to submit a resume.

Intern In Michigan - InternInMichigan
New Web Portal for College Students

• Students: Find an internship in your chosen field where you can open the door to
your career. Post your profile today.
• Employers: Find college internship candidates with skills that match your
opportunities.

Internships Help You To:
• Stand out in a competitive job market
• Network and connect with professionals
• Apply classroom learning in the real world
• Explore career options and enhance professional skills
• Build a stronger resume

Hot Shots: Monthly Career Connection Events in Ann Arbor
Sponsored by Ann Arbor SPARK
Are you graduating this year and looking to join dynamic, growing companies right here in Michigan? Would you like to attend fun career networking events each month in Ann Arbor?

If the answer is yes, then be sure to check out Hot Shots: Career Connections which is featuring some of the hottest growing companies in Michigan. For details, to view the full list of participating companies and job titles, and to register for these events, go to:
Events, at Ann Arbor SPARK

Cool, Growing Michigan Companies
These companies are adding jobs in Michigan now and / or over the next 5 years. Be sure to consider them during your job search now or after you graduate. Follow this link to see a list of Cool Growing Companies in Michigan.

College Connections
Companies That Hire College Graduates

Are you trying to find a list of growing companies in Michigan that hire college graduates for entry level positions? If yes, please check out this list of almost 200 companies who traditionally look for fresh talent:
Companies That Hire College Graduates in Michigan

Temporary Employment - A Great Place to Start
Temp Hire Agencies in Michigan

We're always looking for new ideas and are very open to your suggestions, as we want to help you to provide great, local career options for your students.

Thanks for all of your assistance.

Best regards,

Amy Cell and Mary Salley
Team Talent
Ann Arbor SPARK
Mary@AnnArborUSA.org

Posted by kkowatch on October 09, 2009 at 04:03 PM | Comments (0)

Ten More Job Search Tips

About a week ago I posted an entry on some job search tips relating to LinkedIn and other resources (See Double Entry: LinkedIn Groups and 10 Job Seach Tips)

The author of the job search tips that I referred to recently created another list of tips entitled 10 MORE quick job-search tips -- I bet you're still missing one...

Read on to learn what these tips are...

Everyone knows how to apply for a job; a week ago, i listed ten common sense "little good ideas" and I made a bet that you'd be missing at least three of them. Here are ten more, quick-fixers, and I'll bet you're missing one or two of these, as well. These are little things. which you can change quickly and they're EASY. They might help you in your job search. Or, they might at least help your attitude about a job search. Or both.

If you missed the last article, it's here: PART I

Here are the next ten tips....

1. Put you picture on your LinkedIN profile. There are conflicting reports about the effectiveness of this, but most surveys show that your profile is more apt to be overlooked if it has no picture.

2. If you have a cute greeting on your home telephone line, please change it until you get a job. If a hiring manager happens to call your home number and he gets the message where you're coaxing your three-year-old to do the greeting, he may hang up. Or, if you make the funny message of "we aren't here now; probably out drinking -- leave a message and we'll call you back when we sober up," you might get skipped. They may be cute to you, but...

3. Be gracious in rejection. There is a lot of rejection out there, and if you fight with the decision that you are not number ONE, you may not be a backup, in case number ONE falls through, or has a cute greeting on his home phone. Always thank people for their consideration of your qualifications, and ask for a follow up if another opportunity arises. It can pay dividends. I have a terrific example, but it's too long for here, so it may show up in a future article.

4. In an interview, don't be afraid of a pause in the conversation. If you feel you need to fill that pause, you could fill it with information that won't help your cause. If you don't have anything more to say, don't say anything. If the interviewer seems at a loss, then ask him a question, but don't just fill the pause because it's uncomfortable.

5. Still in the interview, if you are offered a drink of water, take it. If offered a chance to use the rest room, take it. There is no trick here. It does not make you look weak to accept a glass of water, but if you refuse, and 15 minutes later your throat is dry and you're now thinking about your thirst instead of the current question, you'll wish you had a drink. The same thought applies to the rest room; if offered, and you need it, don't feel it's a weakness to accept. It's better than the alternative.

6. Don't get cute on your cover letter. This is a fine line, because I do believe that if you can say something in your cover letter that makes it stand out, that's a positive. But, if you print it on pink stationary, or place poetry in your text, that may be overdoing it. You might try using a P.S., as recommended in the previous article on this topic.

7. Smile--that's it. Smile at networking events, smile at interviews, smile when you meet new people, just smile. Don't be goofy and bare your teeth like you're growling at someone, but practice being genuinely pleased to be involved in whatever you're involved in. When you smile, you put people at ease, you are perceived more positively, and you feel better. It's much easier to smile than to frown, and how bad can you feel when you're smiling?

8. Now that you're out of work, make the decision to improve something about you. Or pick a couple of things. Start going for a walk each evening, or volunteer for a charity, or lose weight or join a new club, play a sport, read more, or, or, or. If you improve something about yourself, you'll feel better, you'll be more positive, you'll smile more, and you'll have more of a transition statement for your next interview. It's a good time to do something that makes you feel good about YOU, and you now have the time to do it.

9. Renew old acquaintances. If you haven't kept in touch, do it now. Don't ask for a job referral on that first re-connect, but with re-opened communications lines, something good can happen. At the least, you've re-connected with a friend. At best, you've re-connected, and they have an idea or a reference that can help you land a job. There aren't many downsides.

10. Implement keywords into your resume. Many resumes get scanned, and you have to hit some key words in order to get noticed. Some of those industry specific keywords are: account manager, accounts payable, account executive, sales manager, human resources manager, executive trainer. You can get more of those on line (there are several sites -- here's one: http://www.resume-help.org/resume_action_words.htm). One keyword that won't count is "good with people." You get my drift.

11. OK, I did 11 last time, so here's one more. Be nice to everyone. I know, everyone thinks they are being nice to everyone, but were you really that nice to the receptionist when you interviewed? Did you say thank you to the waitress when she served you lunch with the hiring manager? Get in the habit of "please" and "thank you." Many of us have gotten out of that habit, and like many of these points, it cannot hurt you, but could help you. And, it's polite.

None of these "little good ideas" take long, or require much effort, but each can have a positive impact. There are a hundred things that can hurt you in the job application process. You might be fixing one, or two, or eleven more here.

Good luck to all of us in our job searches.

Posted by kkowatch on September 15, 2009 at 09:52 AM | Comments (0)

Great LIS Blog on Inteviewing (& More!)

A fellow SI colleague brought to attention a blog that is written by the librarians at the Salem-South Lyon Public Library: The Practical Librarian.

One of the blog posts is about a conversation that the librarians had with one of SI's own recent graduates and its a very interesting and insightful statement about interviewing and networking. Check out the post, linked here at Library Interviewing Ideas.

Posted by kkowatch on July 21, 2009 at 10:11 AM | Comments (0)

Sweet New Job Search Tool

I just learned about a neat new online tool -- Change Detection.

They explain it so well on the site:

"ChangeDetection.com provides page change monitoring and notification services to internet users worldwide. Anyone can use our service to monitor any website page for changes. Just fill in the form below, we will create a change log for the page and alert you by email when we detect a change in the page text. We've been doing it since 1999. It's free."

So, instead of bookmarking and checking all your job sites every few days or so, let this tool email you to let you know that a new job has been posted. Neat, huh?

Posted by kkowatch on July 17, 2009 at 03:00 PM | Comments (0)

Federal Library Advice & Tips

Recently, a federal librarian from the National Park Service provided us with some insight and advice for those that are seeking library careers in the federal government. See below for some relevant information for our readers....

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"I'm sorry to inform you that the National Park Service (NPS) is losing, not gaining, professional librarian positions (which are already few and far between), as incumbents retire or vacate the position for other reasons.

Occasionally, a park will get funding for a temporary or term librarian, but our staff is often not made aware of these opportunities until after the fact. The same situation exists regarding work-study positions/paid internships and volunteer positions for library school students or recent grads.

These positions would be posted on the USAJobs (federal government jobs) or the NPS Volunteer website, respectively. The links to those websites are provided on the Opportunities page of the NPS Library Program website. I include the links here for your convenience -- please feel free to post them on your job board:

http://www.library.nps.gov/opportunities.htm
http://www.usajobs.opm.gov/
http://www.nps.gov/volunteer/

Once in a blue moon, a park will get money to hire a library cataloging contractor to do backlog cataloging and/or retrospective conversion (aka 'recon,' which involves automating the card catalog or upgrading legacy electronic records to MARC records). As with all federal contract job opportunities, these must be posted in the federal register and the jobs must be bid for.

Recent library school grads would probably not be able to compete successfully for these jobs on their own, but would have the skills to subcontract with a library contract cataloging organization having experience submitting bids for federal jobs -- new librarians are often hired to do copy cataloging on recon projects by such companies, as I'm sure you're aware.

Best of luck to your grads -- it's a challenge these days for the library profession; I am encourage all recent grads to get a post-grad credential in image management/digital libraries, as that's the future. The other track is end-user interface design.

Key areas (in my opinion) for library school grads to research re leveraging their library science degrees and getting input on what other skills or certification would be good to acquire (there are blogs aplenty as well as electronic journals on the Web to get people immersed in these subject areas quickly -- I've provided a few links below), particularly with respect to careers involving management and dissemination of government information, are:

digital libraries
preservation of digital resources
enterprise image management systems
enterprise document management systems
enterprise knowledge management systems
enterprise metadata management systems
metadata standards
federated searching
end-user interface design
project management (PM is really picking up speed in federal agencies now -- anybody working with any sort of information management application would do well to bone up on PM basics).

There are a handful of universities offering certification in digital libraries but I've been most impressed with Syracuse University's program
-- I think some or all of it might be available through distance learning:
http://ischool.syr.edu/academics/graduate/mls/digitallibraries/

Here's a good website I recently discovered that you may already know about
> http://liscareer.com/ -- there's a book called 'a day in the life...'
advertised on their website that looks great -- offers bird's eye view of 95 different jobs performed by librarians, some of which are quite surprising!

Here's a blog called 'cataloging futures' with IT competencies for metadata librarians > http://www.catalogingfutures.com/catalogingfutures/2008/07/it-competencies-for-metadata-librarians.html

And here's a listserv for metadata librarians and digital librarians:
http://metadatalibrarians.monarchos.com/

And here's a blog for metadata librarians > http://metadatalibrarian.blogspot.com/

Posted by kkowatch on July 14, 2009 at 09:48 AM | Comments (0)

New ALA Web site helps library job seekers succeed

From the NEWLIB listserv...

A new American Library Association (ALA) Web site -- Get a Job!, http://getajob.ala.org -- offers library-job seekers advice, resources, links, best practices and real-life examples. Full of advice for finding a job in the current tough economy, it features information from a range of ALA divisions and units, as well as links to information about general best practices in job seeking.

"New graduates and members looking for jobs in a tough employment market have asked what the association can do to help them; the Get a Job! Web Site was developed with the help of members to do just that," said ALA Executive Director Keith Michael Fiels. “From JobLIST to mentoring opportunities, the new Web site brings together ALA resources as well as true life success stories and advice from HR directors and library staff to provide a one-stop resource for job seekers."

The ALA accelerated the Web site launch in response to the current urgency of many members’ and other library professionals’ job searches. The site is a work-in-progress, where library professionals and support staff will find advice on how to use social networking tools in a job search, what to do if you’re laid off, budgeting assistance, networking techniques and strategies for researching the economy and jobs in various parts of the United States.

As it evolves, the site will include information specific to people seeking their first job, mid-career staff and people changing professions. New material and updates will be added regularly, including podcasts. Site users are encouraged to subscribe to the Get a Job! RSS feed to take full advantage of the updates. We welcome your suggestions and experiences for the site; please e-mail information that you’d like to share to gaj@ala.org.
Get a Job! is being developed by nine ALA units in collaboration with the American Library Association-Allied Professional Association.

Posted by kkowatch on July 08, 2009 at 12:28 PM | Comments (0)

Future Interaction Desigers: Want A Mentor?

From the IxDA website at http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=42798

The IxDA Mentorship volunteer group is ready to formally kickoff the first phase of the mentorship program. This phase is technically and logistically simple; volunteers act as "match makers" to pair potential mentors with those seeking some professional assistance. This is a fluid, amorphous initiative; there is no set program, or set of activities for people to do. Instead, we hope to encourage digital relationship building that can extend into the real world as appropriate.

If you are interested in becoming a mentor, or finding a mentor, please fill out the forms listed below. If you are interested in joining the organizational side of this effort, please drop me an email.

I need a mentor!

Please visit http://www.ixda.org/mentee.php and fill out the form as thoroughly as you can. Please note that, while we hope to find mentors for everyone who needs them, there is no guarantee that we will find a perfect match for you. The mentorship initiative starts digitally, through email, but can extend in whatever direction you and your mentor see fit.

I want to be a mentor!
Please visit http://www.ixda.org/mentor.php and fill out the form as thoroughly as you can. An ideal mentor has not only thorough experience and skills, but also the time and patience to dedicate to working with those who are learning a new profession. Please note that, while we hope to find matches for everyone who needs them, there is no guarantee that we will find a perfect match for you. The mentorship initiative starts digitally, through email, but can extend in whatever direction you and your "mentee" see fit.

Thanks,
Jon Kolko

Posted by kkowatch on June 25, 2009 at 01:53 PM | Comments (0)

Eleven Ways to Keep Your Job Search Moving

I recently received a newsletter from a group that I'm involved with that shared 11 points of advice for people who are about to enter the work force from a graduate program. I thought that the information was very interesting and relevant to our recent grads. So, thank you ACPA Commission for Career Development for the basis of this blog entry. (Note that this information has been edited for relevancy to our readership.)
************************

....note that many states are in the process of finalizing their budget allocations for the new fiscal year. Although there will likely be more cuts in high education for several states, many state institutions will be receiving new allocations from the stimulus package. This means that the hiring freeze in many institutions may be lifted, so keep an eye out for new openings this summer.

Top Eleven Ways to Keep your Job Search Moving

1. If you are graduating from a Master’s or Doctoral Program, discuss extending your Graduate Assistantship or Internship. Additional skills and experience gained through the summer can be critical to your competitiveness in the higher education market, and also expose you to different aspects of Career Development functions.

2. Volunteer – If you can’t extend an existing internship, assistantship, or current position, start a new one! Many offices have summer projects or have students who continue taking classes in the summer. Volunteering at a new office will also give you a greater breadth of experience, while allowing you the flexibility to continue your job search.

3. Job Shadow – Contact offices, libraries, or recruiters at your preferred organization in your geographic area (or the one you are trying to get to) and ask about shadowing for a week in their office. It will give you an interesting glimpse into a different institution, as well as expose you to best practices. Many offices that can’t take on interns will be open to someone shadowing professionals for a week.

4. Conduct Informational Interviews – Many professionals are open to sitting down with candidates to discuss their offices, practices and students. Calling around to make appointment will gain you strong network connections, and also keep you at the front of people’s minds when positions open up.

5. Consider Retooling your resume and cover letters – Depending on the level of response you are getting, you may want to have someone in your preferred field look at your resume. Solicit advice from people you shadow or conduct informational interviews with.

6. Apply for positions that aren’t there yet! – Make sure that you connect with offices in your geographic area, expressing appropriate interest through your cover letter, and inquire about the possibility of positions in the future. While time intensive on the research end, this can be INCREDIBLY effective when positions become open unexpectedly, getting your foot in the door before it’s even open!

7. Follow-up! Continue to connect with mentors, people you meet at conventions, and professionals who have offered their assistance to you. Update them on your circumstances and your search needs and help them remember to help you!

8. Use your Network – (it’s not just a Verizon Wireless thing) – In difficult job markets, the #1 way to find new opportunities is through networking. Continue to be in touch with your personal and professional network, and don’t be afraid to utilize social networking sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook. A brief update that lets your connections and friends know that you are job searching will increase your exposure to job opportunities, even if they are part-time. Also be sure to let appropriate people know where you have applied, as they may have connections they can introduce you to.

9. Continue advancing your professional development and take courses – While this can be pricey, additional qualifications such as specialized certifications or tech skills (consider a local community college to update your web skills) can help boost your resume while giving you practical experience to talk about in interviews.

10. Think outside the box – Not finding positions in traditional four-year public or private schools, high-tech firms or what you normally think you should work in? Consider community colleges, professional schools, for-profit institutions, community organizations, and even the corporate world! Your skills can be transferrable to many areas in the sector opposite for what it is that you thought you would go in to when you started your grad program. In a market like this one, it’s important to realize that experience is experience, no matter where you get it!

11. CONVENTIONS AND CONFERENCES – As summer nears, many professional demands decline, espcially in universities, and professionals have time to work on themselves! Many regional career development conferences are held over the summer, BE AWARE OF THEM.

Posted by kkowatch on May 08, 2009 at 09:02 AM | Comments (0)

Announcing ALA Connect

I saw this post on the LM_Net listserv and I wanted to share this resource with our readers.

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If you know of any graduate MLIS programs that encourage their members to post to listserv's like LM_NET, could you let them know about ALA Connect http://connect.ala.org/? This is a very exciting new feature from ALA that provides a social community for librarians even if they are not ALA members.

If you aren't a member, you can register, read and post. You just won't see as much detail.

If you are a member, you just log on using your membership ID and your password. The program has already linked you to each of your committees and provides these with forums for work. You can decide if your committee work and posts are viewable to the public or just to the committee.

You can also create your own community. I heard another librarian jokingly say he hasn't seen a group for "Librarians who own cats" yet and I'm thinking this would be a fun group. I am very excited about the possibilities of this program. It's like a professional playground for people who like facebook and it's a convenient collaborative workplace.

One of the features I like is that you can search for a committee and see the membership list. If you were wondering who is actually on the Intellectual Freedom committee, you can easily find out. It makes much of ALA transparent. I know Jenny Levine has worked with some of the members here on LM_NET to design this and I hope you will check it out.
************************

About ALA Connect...

ALA Connect replaces the existing Online Communities service that ALA currently offers as a virtual, collaborative, workspace online. A few member groups have been using Communities, but it wasn't widely adopted, so we've revamped it using new software called Drupal. We hope this will become a centralized space where official ALA groups can work together online. In addition, any member can create new communities (unofficial ALA groups) without any staff assistance, so the site will combine association work with communities of interest in one place.

Every active ALA group already has a space in Connect automatically, because we've pre-populated it with data from our membership database (iMIS), and we synchronize member data nightly, so we'll always know which committees you're on and which other official ALA groups you're part of.

Both ALA groups and communities use the same types of tools. By default, each one has blog posts, online documents (like wiki pages), a calendar, polls, a chat room, a discussion board, and images (logos, pictures, etc.). The group can use whichever of the tools it finds valuable.

Non-members will be able to register in Connect to create a free account, but they will only be able to view and add to public content. They won't be able to search for ALA members, view member data, or take advantage of any of the networking features.

In phase one (which we're in now), members can also identify other members as co-workers, frequent collaborators, classmates, and friends in order to create an online professional network that mirrors and extends their physical world on.

But it's really phase two where we start implementing ways for you to find and connect with other members around professional interests, issues, advocacy, your job, the work of the Association, meeting up with friends & colleagues when you attend ALA conferences, and the like. Sometimes we've referred to this as "ALA's social network," but it's probably more accurate to think of it as ALA's professional network, an online version of what has traditionally taken place in the physical world. This isn't going to be "ALA MySpace," although there will be hooks into and out of some social sites such as Flickr (for pictures), and Delicious. We know you don't need yet another place to go to update your status, but you might find it valuable to see what your colleagues are working on and where.

Because ALA knows a little bit about you (if you're part of a division, how long you've been a member, what committees you've served on, etc.), we plan to help you pre-populate your profile with all of the great work you've done for ALA in your professional career. That way, if you decide you want to display your profile to colleagues, potential employers, or even publicly, we'll have created a curriculam vitae of all of your contributions. We really appreciate members' efforts, and we want to help others appreciate you, too, by letting you show off the great work you do.

You can read more about the history (and future) of ALA Connect on the ITTS Update blog, particularly in the Roadmap that we posted there. In the near future we'll be expanding the online help and posting some tutorial videos, but if you have a specific question about the site or our goals for it, please feel free to post a question as a comment here, in the Discussion Forum for questions, or using our contact form. Don't forget to read through the user guidelines before you start posting content, but we hope to make your Connect experience as easy and practical as possible.

Posted by kkowatch on May 04, 2009 at 04:16 PM | Comments (0)

CareerLeak website

A while back, I posted an entry about a job search website, CareerLeak.com.

I just wanted to remind you of this excellent resource and to let you also know that they've done a major makeover and the site is much more user friendly. It also has more features such as Occupation Profiles and a "growing" Resume Database. They are adding new and unique content everyday.

They have a lot of interesting resources, one of which is profiles about companies. It looks like actual employees can create individual profiles about their organization and indicate Job Satisfaction, Management Qualities, Stress Level, and Education Required for a variety of different jobs. Check it out!

Posted by kkowatch on April 29, 2009 at 08:49 AM | Comments (0)

Blogging for your Career

At the portfolio panel SI Career Services hosted earlier in winter 2009 term, one of the students had a professional blog on her site – Sensical – which I noted as an excellent way for this particular student to demonstrate what they were learning to the world and also for them to spend time reflecting on their studies.

Not too long after that, I was invited to attend a webinar hosted by Brazen Careerist. Brazen Careerist is "a community of top Gen Y thought leaders, forward-thinking organizations and everyone else who realizes that the way we define ourselves in both work and in life needs to change." Brazen Careerist was founded by Penelope Trunk, who has an excellent blog, Penelope Trunk's Brazen Careerist, with many interesting entries about blogging for your job.

At this webinar, the speaker provided some great advice and tips for students to consider when creating an online presence through a blog. I thought that the SI student and alumni population would be especially interested in this knowledge, especially knowing that many of our students already are very active in the blogosphere.

So here we go.

The old way of doing a job search was an “active job search.” This is where you go out and find jobs and apply to them by sending your resume and cover letter to a postal or email address. The new way to do a job search is to do a “constant job search.” A constant job search is on going. In fact, you many already be doing your constant job search right now. This includes actively building a network (i.e. your SI classmates, LinkedIn, professional organization colleagues), monitoring your online presence (have you Googled yourself lately?), learning about new opportunities through your network (in contrast to learning about them through a job board), and job-hopping when appropriate.

Brazen Careerist strongly promotes the idea of using a blog as the way to get your next job. And, they give solid reasons for why blogs are (one of) the most effective career tool. For one, a blog helps you build a personal brand. Bloggers stand out from the crowd. Most resumes look pretty similar (as do blogs visually), but the content of blogs can vary incredibly! What you can contribute to your blog will go above and beyond that of what you can add to your resume or even your unique, tailored resume. Also, having a blog shows initiative and creates talking points for you in your resume, cover letter, interviews, and in life in general.

A blog also provides amazing networking opportunities. The barriers that people face when applying for jobs through a corporate careers website do not exist when you are a blogger – or even a blog reader. You are easily accessible as are most bloggers that you want to talk to. This multiples your network immensely -- but only if you take advantage of these contacts.

Also, contributing to your brand development, a blog in itself is a living resume. Recruiters get in-depth knowledge about you and what you know and how you do things from your blog. A blog may not be as visual as an e-portfolio, but it is much more dynamic (unless you update your portfolio weekly or daily, which is just about unheard of!) Also, you may have noticed that many job descriptions state a requirement for “excellent communication skills.” A blog demonstrates that – and it will help you hone your writing skills as you go along.

Lastly, blogging establishes you as an expert. You can create your niche and promote yourself as being knowledgeable in the field. Brazen Careerist says that the expert status is no longer reserved for the experienced and that the youthful and public can now take on that stance also. And, it makes research fun. You’re going to have to think hard about a lot of stuff and look it up – so why not make your research all the more enjoyable since it will be for your blog?

So, how does one become an Effective Blogger? How does one make blogging work for their career? First of all, choose a topic or subject that you are going to focus on. Your blog should be tailored, so you should stick to one general theme throughout all of your posts. This can be an area of interest to you and should be in alignment with your professional field of choice or in the industry or function that you want to work in.

Then, choose a blog platform. There are many out there – Typepad, Wordpress, Blogspot, Weebly. Then, choose a domain name. You want this to accurately reflect your topic. Using your name is always good for networking – of course, then everything you put on there must be professional. Your preferred domain name may not be available, so think of a couple options. It’s always ideal to also purchase your direct domain name if you have the technological prowess to redirect the link. A suggested domain site is GoDaddy where a domain name is around $10 per year.

Then, start your research and development. Read lots of other blogs and make notes of what you like, don’t like, what is done well, and what isn’t. Start leaving comments on other blog sites and make sure to include your link to your blog. This is a form of reciprocal networking… you’re investing in others, and by doing so you are investing in your own network.

Then, set a schedule and start writing consistently. A blog post make take you anywhere from one to four hours to write, so plan accordingly and decide if once a week, once a day, bi-weekly or whatever is best for you. Be sure to not start out sprinting… new bloggers will write every day for a couple weeks… and then never write again. So, start out realizing that a blog is more of a marathon and that you need to space your postings out best for your life and writing schedule.

The hardest part of all is building a following. You need to get the word out. Add your blog link to your email signature, your LinkedIn profile, your Facebook site, your portfolio site. And, actively put it out there when you read other’s blogs or post comments on sites. This is the biggest and most important part of building your brand to make your blog work for you and your career development.

To wrap things up, it’s also important to touch upon how you can use your blog to get the job you want. Like I mentioned above, you need to get your blog link out there. Make sure to also include it on your resume – at the top in the contact information section. You should include a short blurb about it to draw attention.

You should also treat your blog like a living resume. You need to add a picture to it, add an “about me” page, and make sure that your contact information is displayed everywhere. As great as you may be, if a recruiter can’t easily get a hold of you via their most preferred contact method, they can easily move on to another qualified candidate. Lastly, be sure to talk about your blog in interviews. I firmly believe that the blog writing process is equivalent to the reflective process that is part of the PEP program at SI. Similarly, this writing process will help you to distill your thoughts and opinions about what you are learning and going to be applying which will make you sound all the better in your interviews. You blog entries will demonstrate to any employer your depth of knowledge in a subject, your prowess in social media applications (which is an in-demand skill!), and it gives you the opportunity to share that you can “mentor up” (basically train your boomer-generation boss on how to use Wikipedia or a blog effectively in the workplace.)

Blogging in this way allows you to leap over the barriers that are in place in the job-search world. Bloggers share information informally and the formal hierarchy that is in place for job applicants is removed. Therefore, you can be in contact with just about anyone that’s relevant to your needs - as they can be with you!

To conclude, blogging takes time, dedication and hardwork. Its not something that can be done overnight. Each blog entry in itself is time-consuming and the time it takes to gather a following takes more effort and dedication. BUT, employers will recognize the hard work and they’ll notice your dedication to the field. So, if you are willing to do it right, your next blog entry could mean your last formal job application ever.

Posted by kkowatch on April 28, 2009 at 12:27 PM | Comments (0)

Free Resume Printing at FedEx Kinkos

From the Marketing Shift Blog...

In steady economic times, freebies and giveaways are associated with grand openings, holidays, a special occasion or festive event . But this economy is far from stable, and that's what inspired FedEx (NYSE: FDX) to take new approach to the time-tested promotional tactic.

On March 10, 1,600+ FedEx Office Print and Ship Centers will print up to 25 resume copies for free. The timely promo,called Free Resume Printing Day , was created to help job seekers who were casualties of the recession. FedEx office CEO Brian Philips said:

We understand that the economy has affected many people in a very profound way, and we want to help.Printing resumes is one small way we can use our resources to help those who need it

Here's the only rule: Orders must be placed and picked up in-store. Customers may place orders by submitting their resume in printed format or as a digital file, and the copies will be printed single-sided on resume-quality paper. Usually, promotional giveaways are designed to entice customers to buy more products once they've been lured into the store, but considering the promo's target audience, you can't expect them to have very much discretionary income.

Philips should be credited for executing a plan that's sure to boost the company's image and reputation among the general public.

Here’s the link to share with job-seekers:
http://www.marketingshift.com/2009/3/fedex-office-host-free-resume.cfm

Posted by kkowatch on March 06, 2009 at 04:48 PM | Comments (0)

ARLIS/NA Career Mentoring Program

Recently posted on the ART LIBRARIES SOCIETY DISCUSSION LIST...

The ARLIS/NA Mentoring Subcommittee of the Professional Development Committee invites members to apply for the Career Mentoring Program, to commence at the annual conference in Indianapolis. In order to facilitate optimal matching of mentor/mentee pairs, a short application form is required; it can be found at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/afa/pdc/mentoringform.htm

Please note: Attendance at the free Career Mentoring Program workshop, scheduled for Fri. April 17, 12:30-4:30 p.m., is mandatory for participation in the year-long program. Workshop facilitators Sarah Carter and Rachel Resnik will work with mentor/mentee pairs to define responsibilities, refine expectations and goals, and set the groundwork for a successful mentoring relationship.

The Conference Networking Program is separate from the Career Mentoring Workshop and Program, and will take place as usual. Sarah Falls will announce the Conference Networking Program on ARLIS-L.

Please contact us with any questions you may have.

Heidi Hass, chair, Mentoring Subcommittee
Sarah Carter, member, Mentoring Subcommittee
Rachel Resnik, member, Mentoring Subcommittee
--
V. Heidi Hass
Head of Research Services
The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Ave.
New York, NY 10016-3403
TEL: 212 590-0381
FAX: 212-768-5681
NET: vhhass@themorgan.org
Visit CORSAIR, the Museum's comprehensive collections catalog, on the web at http://corsair.themorgan.org

Posted by kkowatch on February 24, 2009 at 06:51 PM | Comments (0)

Looking for International Work or Internship?

The UM International Center is pleased to announce the availability of a fantastic new online resource for people interested in seeking employment abroad. The Big Guide to Living and Working Overseas is filled with advice for securing overseas employment. Topics include acquiring international experience, the international job search, professions abroad, and various international career directories.

This service is paid for by the UM International Center and is free for the UM community. Click on the link below to register and get started!

http://www.workingoverseas.com/umich

We will be interested in hearing what you think of this site—please e-mail comments (with “Big Guide” as subject) to ic-abroad@umich.edu
Bill Nolting and Kelly Nelson, International Center, tel. 647-2299, http://internationalcenter.umich.edu/swt

Posted by kkowatch on February 20, 2009 at 03:52 PM | Comments (0)

Want to Live and Work Overseas?

The UM International Center is pleased to announce the availability of a fantastic new online resource for people interested in seeking employment abroad. The Big Guide to Living and Working Overseas is filled with advice for securing overseas employment. Topics include acquiring international experience, the international job search, professions abroad, and various international career directories.

This service is paid for by the UM International Center and is free for the UM community. Click on the link below to register and get started!

www.workingoverseas.com/umich

Posted by kkowatch on December 05, 2008 at 12:44 PM | Comments (0)

Interested in Records Management?

I've been getting a handful of requests from students about how to find internships in Records Management. Here's the response that I provided to a student who recently requested advice. If you would like more specific advice, make an appointment to see me... Kelly
*********************************

A good resource for getting a start on this would be to look at the past internship listings at http://si.umich.edu/careers/internships.htm The students, off the top of my head, that did RM internships are David Zande and Jon Ponder. You could either contact those (former) students or the organizations where they did their internships to inquire if they would be interested in another RM student intern next term.

You can also use iTrack to search for RM contacts...
Once you login, go to Employers and do a key word search for "records" (or other relevant keywords). You'll get a list of organizations that have either contacts or functions related to records management.

You can also look at past RM internships that have been posted to iTrack under the Jobs-->iTrack Jobs-->Archived Employer Contacts and Jobs/Internship Tab.

You should also consider attending the ARMA Meeting on December 17th (invitation below). Past SI students have had good luck with attending this to network with people in the area to find internships.

Lastly, you can always cold-call UM departments and/or local firms to ask if they are interested in having a RM intern. The UM departments that are good to start with are Human Resources, Audits, Legal, Accounting -- and likewise, local organizations that are involved in RM are most likely going to be in the following industries: accounting, HR, legal, energy, and government. You can also contact the Bentley Historical library to inquire about university records related internships.

From: Henderson, Brenton
Date: Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 10:46 AM
Subject: December 17th ARMA Detroit Meeting Notice!

Good morning. On behalf of the ARMA Detroit Chapter Programs Committee, I would like to invite you to the December 17th Chapter Meeting.

Date: Wednesday, December 17, 2008
Time: 7:30 am - 9:30am

Location: Detroit Zoo, Wildlife Interpretive Gallery 8450 W 10 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48067

Speaker: Patrick Cunningham
Topic Description: "Taking a Leadership Role When IT and RM Intersect"

Many records managers are faced with the challenge of assuming a greater leadership role in their organization. As technological issues increasingly determine how information is managed, records managers must often develop expertise outside their areas of training in order to participate in management level discussions. Speaking authoritatively about the technological needs of RIM staff is a prerequisite for participating in larger discussions about which direction an organization should take to best meet its mission-critical objectives. Successful collaboration with IT requires records managers to understand the fundamentals of computer terminology and to express RIM objectives in a language understood by IT staff. Mastering these skills will lead to better collaboration with IT and will help records managers gain the institutional respect that they deserve.

About the Speaker: PATRICK J. CUNNINGHAM, CRM is Director, Information Management, Collection & Preservation with Motorola, Inc. in Schaumburg, IL. Pat leads Motorola's Information Management, Collection and Preservation team whose responsibilities include global records management, IT data privacy, and litigation and investigation support. The team includes two Certified Records Managers, a Certified Information Privacy Professional, and two Certified Information Systems Security Professionals Pat's 20+ years in records and information management have presented him with many diverse experiences. Previously, he was Records Management trategist for Hewitt Associates. He has worked as a Web-enabled Information Technologies consultant with Whittman-Hart in Chicago and as Records Manager for Household International. He has also worked for the Archdiocese of Chicago and the Illinois State Archives as a records manager. Pat is a frequent speaker on topics in Information and Records Management. His more than 100 presentations over the past 15 years have covered a variety of topics on the Internet, Records Management, and technology. He has spoken numerous times at the ARMA International Conference, at local and regional seminars, and has participated as a panelist for several legal forums.

Cost includes: Breakfast Buffet: $35 ARMA Members; $49 Non-ARMA Members; $17.50 Designated Retirees/Students, Walk-ins will be charged an additional $5 fee.

For additional details and to register, log on to http://www.armadetroit.org/.
Please register by December 10th, 2008 to help us provide our caterer an accurate headcount.

We hope to see you there!

Brenton Henderson
Programs Vice President
ARMA Detroit Chapter
248-486-2150 Office
248-417-4832 Cell
248-486-2168 Fax
bdhenderson@bcbsm.com

Posted by kkowatch on November 20, 2008 at 03:30 PM | Comments (0)

Check out the New LISjobs.com

Rachel Singer Gordon is a leading author on library careers. She also maintains a job site, LISjobs.com, that I recommend to SI students. "I approve LISjobs.com" ~ Kelly

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LISjobs.com launches new website

Villa Park, IL -- Visitors to LISjobs.com will notice a new look and feel today as the newly-redesigned site launches. The redesign brings LISjobs.com in line with current web standards and adds new content and features. Note that old links willl be broken; please update your links and bookmarks.

Highlights of the redesign include:
• Better integration of the LISjobs.com forum and other interactive site features.
• Job ads that, as always, are free to both job seekers and employers.
• New content on education and career development, including information on MLIS scholarships as well as on funding conference attendance and other CE opportunities.
• A more standards-compliant and accessible design.
• A new logo designed by Wendy Koff, Librarian and Web Designer.
• Updated links to outside resources; all links were checked manually in October 2008.
• Improved organization -- information for both job seekers and employers is now easier to find.
• Opportunities for sponsorship -- relevant organizations can easily reach an audience of librarians and info pros.

"I'm excited to launch the new and improved LISjobs.com to better serve librarians, library workers, and info pros at all stages of their careers," says webmaster Rachel Singer Gordon. "Stay tuned for more additions and improvements soon!"

Love the new logo? Grab yourself a t-shirt at the new LISjobs.com Cafepress store. Find a job on LISjobs.com? Join the Flickr group, upload your photo, and you could see yourself featured on the site. (Don't have a Flickr account? Email your photo and story to rachel@lisjobs.com.)

LISjobs.com offers:
• Free job ads
• Free bimonthly professional development newsletter
• Low-cost resume posting
• A library career- and professional development-related online discussion forum
• Career Q&A from Susanne Markgren and Tiffany Allen
• Rethinking Information Careers, a regular column by Kim Dority
• ... and more!

Come, explore, join in, and become part of the LISjobs.com community.
Contact: Rachel Singer Gordon

Posted by kkowatch on October 24, 2008 at 11:58 AM | Comments (0)

Are You Looking for a Mentor?

Posted on behalf of the Mentoring Committee of the New Members Round Table (NMRT) of ALA:

Have you been a librarian for 5 years or less? Do you sometimes feel you have professional questions to ask and no one to direct them to? Do you find yourself wondering, in the midst of budget season, or in that massive collection development strategy meeting… what the heck are they talking about? Well, through NMRT's Mentoring Committee, help has arrived! Here's your chance to meet a new librarian ally, and to have someone to ask about all those questions you can't really ask!

The NMRT Mentoring Committee will pair up "newbie librarians" with "seasoned vets" as part of our Career Mentoring program. The program will last from October 2008 to July 2009. Conference attendance is not required, but membership in ALA is required, and NMRT membership is encouraged. Applications are due October 17, 2008, with the goal of notifying the matching pairs by the end of October.
For further information and to apply, please visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/rts/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/mentor/mentoringcommittee.cfm

Lisa Tattersall
Reference Librarian, Adult Services
Corvallis-Benton County Public Library
645 NW Monroe Avenue
Corvallis, OR 97330
541-766-6488
lisa.tattersall@ci.corvallis.or.us

Posted by kkowatch on September 30, 2008 at 03:18 PM | Comments (0)

Employers@SI - Tips and Etiquette

Its only the fourth week of school, and Career Services is already busy with a slate of employers visiting SI for recruiting! Hopefully this is a sign that SI will be less impacted by the financial troubles that our country is experiencing. As one of the company reps told me today, when times are tough, organizations hire less employees but need to continue to get the work done so IT hiring increases. Good news for our technology-oriented folks!

At SI, we've already had Ford Motor Company and Deloitte... many more are slated to come (check iTrack for a full listing). Spring, has proven in the past to be even more busy.

Since the majority of SI students are not business undergraduates, it's not a surprise that many of the MSI population are not familiar with what you should do or how you should act while at an Employer Presentation. The tips below can help you to make a strong impression to recruiters and company representatives; these will help you to stand out and to network effectively.

See below for tips on how to make the most of Employer Visits and Presentations at SI.

1. Ask questions. It’s not uncommon for a visiting employer to ask if there are any questions after a presentation. Personally, I don't mind that there are often only a few questions after my workshops and presentations because I know that you can meet with me anytime you like with questions, but for an employer, it’s important that you show you are interested and want to learn more about what they have to say. Other than an interview, if you are lucky enough to get one, this is your only chance to ask those burning questions about your potential future employer. Plus, the person that asks intelligent and interested questions is the one that the employer remembers and will be more likely to slate for an interview or report back to the organization about.

Don't know what to ask? Think about the fact that you will spend more time at your job than you will awake at home. I think that that little fact should encourage you to ask questions about how and where you will be spending the majority of your time. Click on the extended entry to see suggestions.
Of course, your own original questions are the best, especially those that show you have done research on the company and demonstrate your sincere interest.

(Questions adapted from Career Services at Virginia Tech and Career Consulting Corner)

2. Turn your computer off. There is nothing more rude than showing up at an employer presentation and visibly (and audibly) typing and burying your nose in your laptop during a presentation. These employers sometimes fly across the country to tell you about their employment opportunities, at great expense, and the least you can do is give them your full attention for an hour. If you're not focusing on the presentation, the impression that you give is that you showed up to grab a free piece of pizza and catch up on your email.

3. Attend the presentation. Even if the organization isn't recruiting for a position or function that you are interested in, if you are interested in working there, attend the presentation. Meeting with any recruiter or employer is the best way for you to get an "in" to the company. They may not need or specifically want you in their department, but they can go back to their colleagues that might be interested in your skills and tell them about you. It’s also a good way for you to learn some of the insider information about the organization or interviewing that you could not possibly get from any other source. And, you can get a business card to follow-up with and to request for a referral to someone that is in the department or area of your interest.

4. Research the organization. I think that the points that I stated above should give reason why this is important. Research helps you ask more intelligent and directed question, shows the recruiter or presenter that you have interest and initiative, and it will give you a foundation to the information in the presentation so that all of the information that is provided isn't overwhelming. Research will help you make a more educated decision on whether or not the company is a good fit for you.

5. Lastly... don't let the presentation make or break your impression of the company. Sometimes, presenters aren't the best seller of their own company. Sometimes -- and this is rare -- I'm a bit mystified by the lack of presentation skills demonstrated by presenting employers but still, it’s important to look beyond the recruiters' presentation abilities and see if the values, function, and career opportunities from this organization are ideal for you. Focus on the content and not the presenter, as they are often only one in several thousand employees! Luckily, this isn't usually the case, and often the representatives from the company that come to SI do a terrific job of selling their organization, which in the end, only makes it harder for you to make a decision!

If you have questions, don't hesitate to contact me. ~ Kelly

See below for suggestions:

• What are the day-to-day responsibilities of this job?
• Who are your main industry competitors?
• What are the company's strengths and weaknesses compared to its competition?
• How important does upper management consider the function of this department/position?
• What is the organization's plan for the next five years, and how does this department fit in?
• Could you explain your organizational structure?
• How will my leadership responsibilities and performance be measured? By whom?
• Could you describe your company's management style and the type of employee who fits well with it?
• What are some of the skills and abilities necessary for someone to succeed in this job?
• What is the company's policy on providing seminars, workshops, and training so employees can keep up their skills or acquire new ones?
• What particular computer equipment and software do you use?
• What kind of work can I expect to be doing the first year?
• What percentage of routine, detailed work will I encounter?
• How much opportunity is there to see the end result of my efforts?
• Who will review my performance? How often?
• How much guidance or assistance is made available to individuals in developing career goals?
• How much opportunity will I have for decision-making in my first assignment?
• Can you describe an ideal employee?
• What is your organization's policy on transfers to other cities?
• What is the recruitment schedule like?
• What sort of questions should I expect an in interview? What sort of skills or abilities will set me apart?
• What freedom would I have in determining my own work objectives, deadlines, and methods of measurement?
• What advancement opportunities are available for the person who is successful in this position, and within what time frame?
• In what ways has this organization been most successful in terms of products and services over the years?
• What significant changes do you foresee in the near future?
• How is one evaluated in this position?

Posted by kkowatch on September 23, 2008 at 01:30 PM | Comments (0)

Check out CareerLeak.com

Not too long ago, I posted a blog about the career resource, Vault, which you can access through the UM Career Center. SI Careers received via email a link to a similar, but free, site called CareerLeak.com. Check it out add some information!

**************
CareerLeak Redefines Job Research

CareerLeak is simple; by focusing on the power of crowd sourcing, individuals can post, search and explore careers. CareerLeak is free and is an open community that encourages individuals to post their experiences in order to enhance the content of the site. This is not a site to rant a rave, rather an opportunity to post and search objective job profiles.

CareerLeak was established with the objective to remove barriers that job seekers encounter when searching for a job. These barriers include, lack of insight to company culture, manager quality, salaries, working environment, and more. Transparency will empower the job seeker by providing information that can help eliminate certain companies as potential employers. This is very similar to the way an employer screens its applicants, just reversed. In reality, the benefits of CareerLeak extend beyond being a tool for prospective hires and includes employers. An employer can not only get anonymous feedback from their employees, but theoretically have their applicant pool screened by eliminating employees that for one facet or another didn't match based on the applicant research on CareerLeak.com

Post Individuals who are currently working, or have previously been employed fill out simple surveys that intend to discover aspects of working for specific employers. Survey items include salaries, hours, education required, management abilities and more.

Search Surveys immediately become searchable. Prospective employees can explore what it is like to work at a company before they even apply. They can even find interview information that can help land the job they are pursing.

Explore Additional resources are available including articles, occupation profiles, and advice.

*******************

CareerLeak is a free user generated job site that focuses on insider information from real companies. The site operates like vault.com, but it is free.

We are fairly new, however you will see that the site has many substantial pages that will benefit your students.

Posted by kkowatch on August 11, 2008 at 12:00 PM | Comments (0)

94 ultimate networking, interviewing, negotiating, resume and job board resources find a better gig

Its not uncommon for us bloggers to share resources that we find on other blogs.

From the CARR-listserv, I pulled this link to this great site with 94 job search resources!

94 ultimate networking, interviewing, negotiating, resume and job board resources find a better gig

at
http://www.journerdism.com/index.php/2008/02/24/94-ultimate-networking-interviewing-negotiating-resume-and-job-resources-find-a-better-job-and-stop-complaining/
or http://tinyurl.com/yqh3pv

If you think that there is any one particular link that is really good, leave a comment!

Posted by kkowatch on August 11, 2008 at 09:48 AM | Comments (0)

Over qualified, but willing to pay dues (at least for a little while)?

Well, I'm back from vacation and it was great. While I was gone, the emails sure mounted up. An interesting discussion on the WRK4US listserv caught my eye and I wanted to bring it to your attention. This is a situation that occurs more often for people that are doing a a geographically-targeted job search, but often in a job search, a person is tempted to apply for a job that they are over-qualified for you. When the resume is received, the search committee will most likely dismiss this applicant as being over-qualified or too easily bored.

One subscriber on the WRK4US list, asked the following:

"Does anyone have any experience in telling potential employers that, if they don't have a PhD-level job, you're willing to take anything - -absolutely anything - to get your foot in the door? I mean, answering phones, stuffing envelopes, ANYTHING.

Are there any tricks or useful 'angles' to take in bringing this up?

After two years on the market (with an expensive professional career coach) I am seeing virtually no marketable skills in my PhD, including teaching, since my program offered no real teaching experience, no preparation for academe, and left me too specialized for half the jobs and not specialized enough for the other half.

In job applications and networking I've been aiming both low and high, narrow and broad, and haven't gotten a single nibble on any application save one.

My field is environmental studies (maybe off-topic - is wrk4us for Humanities?) but I'm in a specialization with zero job marketability. (No space for details here, but trust me.)"

As usual, the responses were varied and many:

The trick is to remember that you *do* have skills. One way to identify your skills is to list *everything* you've done in the past few years - classes you've taken, research you've done, community service activities, etc. - and then match up that list of activities with a skills list. University of Illinois Urbana Champaign has a really nice list of skills for PhDs. Then, when you go to write your cover letter you can cull from this list the list of skills you do have and their supporting activities.

***********

A friend of mine left a computer science PhD program in search of an environmentalist career, and after a period of unemployment he was able to get into the sort of job you describe: he's a bit overqualified for it but he is totally on board with the company's agenda and it's a good start. If you want, I can ask him how he found the opportunity and how he addressed the qualification issue, if it came up. (I think his company is still hiring, too -- a small environmental-education group in the Pacific Northwest.)

*************

My brother recommended to me that I address my over qualification for a position in my cover letter and explicitly explain why working for the company (even being under-employed) was important to and related to my career goals - and how my qualifications might explicitly improve my performance in that position.

**************

A career counselor gave me two good suggestions for applying to jobs for which I might be perceived as overqualified.

1. An "objective" at the top of the resume. Sometimes, objectives are
sometimes a waste of space, but sometimes they can help you justify why you are a reasonable fit for an otherwise improbable job. So, eg.:

OBJECTIVE: To find an entry-level position that will allow me to gain
real-world experience in the such-and-such industry, helping me in my
long-term career goal of such-and-such.

2. A "skills" section right below the objective, listing a bunch of "menial" tasks. By putting these tasks on your resume, you make it clear that you're willing to do them--and you avoid having to say something desperate-sounding in your cover letter like "Despite my seeming overqualification, I am willing to do menial work such as answering phones and making copies." Your skills section could look something like this:

SKILLS
-------
Phones
Photocopies
Filing
Data entry
Word processing
Proofreading
Scheduling
Other office support tasks

Also, I would suggest that you create at least two resumes--one for applying to entry-level jobs and one for more senior jobs. Unfortunately, it's very hard to craft a resume and cover letter that make you sound like a good fit for working at a variety of levels.

**************

I'm curious to know - did you ever try that [see her reply below] and if so what was the result? Also, is there some sort of experience your brother is speaking from, such as being on the hiring end of this kind of situation?

In Reference to... "My brother recommended to me that I address my over qualification for a position in my cover letter and explicitly explain why working for the company (even being under-employed) was important to and related to my career goals - and how my qualifications might explicitly improve my performance in that position."

****************

My brother has a PhD in Biophysics and works for RAND Corporation as a research scientist/manager. He does a great deal of hiring and was giving me advice in that capacity. Whether the same advice holds for a position where they do not already hire PhDs is unclear (people at RAND are likely to have a greater understanding of the value of a PhD) I didn't take all of his advice (the job ad listed a minimum and then a preferred) and did not get an interview for that particular position - however, as those of us who have ever done statistics well know, correlation is not causation!

I tracked down the e-mail he sent me:

This looks like an interesting opportunity, although, as you said, you are over qualified. So, I think you need to address that up front, in your cover letter. Does the job list a minimum, but then a preferred? If so, my cover letter edits are not as applicable. I'd change the cover letter to something like this highlight right away that you are already doing this type of work

"I am currently performing all (many?) of the duties outlined for this position in my current job. This position matches my interests of continuing to [tasks you are doing and want to expand]. In addition, I would have an opportunity to expand my expertise by [xxx]."

"While I understand that you have advertised for someone with a bachelor's degree, I believe that my education and qualifications would add great value to the position. I have a doctorate in [xxx from xxx] and have held [job related] responsibilities at [places worked]. [Doing specific job related tasks] is a task that I enjoy and is the direction in which I have chosen to take my career. Having a PhD allows me [what value do you add over] junior staff would not be able."

**************

Has anyone on the list attempted to or thought about omitting the PhD from his/her resume?

*****************

I job searched without my MA or PhD for a while (actually, a career counsellor told me to do this) - I don't really think it made a difference. For the line of work I was trying to get into, it was less about what I *did* have (graduate degrees) than what I *didn't* (work experience).

As I mentioned, my best results came from re-packaging the PhD as a "large-scale research project".

******************

In reference to..."Has anyone on the list attempted to or thought about omitting the PhD from his/her resume?"...

I have wondered the same thing, particularly when one hears the recent college grads are able to find jobs without difficulty. I've thought about constructing a thin resume with most of my experience and education absent. Unfortunately, it would be fraudulent and would ultimately present problems. In my case, my work experience relates to my Ph.D. For others, however, simply omitting a degree might not be as problematic.

Still, I'm tempted to do it as a sort of experiment to see how much age discrimination is a factor.

*******************

Oh, I think many of us have thought about it, some have done it at different times, and it seems to be another of those things that we repeatedly discuss on the list without coming to any hard and fast conclusion.

(In reference to..."Has anyone on the list attempted to or thought about omitting the PhD from his/her resume?")

*********

Perhaps beating a dead horse here, but I'm asking myself the exact same question. I'm ABD in English, finishing this December, and beginning a Library Science program next month. I have had no success breaking into any kind of library employment, and am pondering how much I should omit of my education and university work experience (mostly teaching, some admin). I am VERY willing to do "menial" tasks--doesn't bother me one bit--but I feel I'm stuck in a over-and-unqualified neverland.

When the position says "Education: High school degree or equivalent," is there a way for someone with more education to remain truthful and still catch HR's attention as a potential hire?

***********

"When the position says "Education: High school degree or equivalent," is there a way for someone with more education to remain truthful and still catch HR's attention as a potential hire?"

This has come up before, but I simply cannot see omitting irrelevant qualifications from a resume as fraud. I don't put my one-month stint at Sam Goody on my resume; neither do I tell people that I tutored students in logic and music theory. This is not because I'm hiding anything: it's because the experiences are irrelevant.

Resumes are not CVs -- they are not exhaustive lists of your life's work. To treat them as such, in my opinion, reflects a misunderstanding of the difference between the academy and other professions.

***************

"This has come up before, but I simply cannot see omitting irrelevant qualifications from a resume as fraud."

I didn't mean to suggest that in all cases omitting the Ph.D. would constitute fraud. Rather, in my particular case leaving out my Ph.D. would also require deleting my post-graduate school work experience. That would mean striking out 15-20 years of my life, with nothing in its place. To fill that gap I would need to construct a fraudulent story. Obviously that would be counterproductive to my job search. Others who have spent less of their lives in the academy could more easily omit the degree. I certainly agree that the purpose of the resume is to highlight the experience and skills most relevant for the particular job one is seeking.

I make a point of not applying for jobs that ask for only a high school diploma since I don't think they will value the skills I bring. Oddly, I've seen a number of jobs for writers and positions at the local historical society that require only a high school degree. In my view, this practice demonstrates the low value placed on historical knowledge and writing skills at these particular organizations.

************

You can sign up to subscribe to the WRK4US listserv at https://lists.duke.edu/sympa/

Search for WRK4US.

Posted by kkowatch on July 15, 2008 at 11:27 AM | Comments (0)

Vault: A GREAT job search resource

For people who work in career services, one of the leading names in publishing and web resources for job search resources is Vault. Vault isn't really a job posting board (although they do post some jobs); they are more famous for the industry career guide books -- i.e. Vault Guide to Case Interviewing; Vault Guide to Resumes, Cover Letters, and Interviews, Vault Guide to the Top 50 Banking Employers, amongst many, many others. These books are usually the leading source for a lot of different realms that come with searching for new jobs.

You can access all of these guides online through the UM Career Center at their Vault Library.

Beyond the books, Vault also maintains a resource in which actual employees of different companies write honest but anonymous testimonies about what its really like to interview and work at a company. See examples:

Microsoft (Program Manager)
Expect numerous rounds of interviews. Microsoft will keep interviewing you until a group says "yeah, we're interested". If you keep doing well on your interviews, they'll continue to "source you out" to groups. But don't expect to get placed quickly - unless you are a true expert in an area that has an opening that fits you perfectly. I interviewed in this last round, over 20 times. My final interviews consisted of one that was 9 hours long (non-stop), and the final one was 11 hours, with time for lunch (but you were interviewed during lunch - so I had just 10 minutes to gobble-down my food at the end - then I was off to the next one). I interviewed with Devs, PMs, Testers, Dev Leads, GPMs, and finally a PUM who's really the person who tries to convince you to come to Microsoft (you know you're doing well at that point). Most of the questions today are not about "solve this crazy problem", or "how many toasters can you fit in the Empire State Building". Instead, they want to know how you might have handled a tricky situation in your past; how you would handle a particular problem. Some will still give you a problem, but expect you to get up and show that you can attack it, and get to some conclusion.


Royal Dutch/Shell Group (Geologist)
Shell continues to have one of the most bizarre interview processes in the industry. One question I was asked was "What do you think of manned exploration of Mars?" This is supposed to give the interviewee an opportunity to show creative thinking with no preparation. In another previous Shell interview I was asked "What do you think about tourism?". I have no idea what weight these questions are given, but the thing that seemed to get me hired the first time was a series of essay questions I answered where I related experiences with selling bananas in the Caribbean. Apparently the answers they valued were those demonstrating creativity and out-of-the box thinking. Those stories were apparently circulated at Shell among my managers because I was often asked about it. Shell's campus recruiting is often followed up by a full day 'interview' at a Shell location, which is a day of exercises in teamwork, analysis, and thinking skills.


L'Oreal (Product Manager)
There are numerous interview rounds at L'Oreal. However it seems to be different for every person. I had colleagues that interviewed with the CEO and others that only interviewed with HR. Some went through 5 rounds while others went through 2. You should be confident and curious. If they give you a product and ask you to talk about it, feel free to open the product up, play with it, if it is a jar or cream you can touch the cream. L'Oreal is all about "magic and passion" and they want smart people who are passionate about marketing. Show whoever is interviewing you that you are unique with amazing talents and drive. In marketing they look for people who are creative and analytical (50/50). Understand the difference between the divisions within the company in terms of brand positioning. Each of the 18 brands has a position (distribution, price, target market, etc...) and L'Oreal wants you to understand that...Read more

Maersk (Management Trainee)
I went through a 3-round process. First, all applicants to ANY job in Maersk must take the Wonderlic Logic and Reasoning test. Second, the Predictive Index personality assessment is given to applicants. Between the 1st and 2nd interviews with a recruiter and the trainee program manager, I was required to write letters to each interviewer describing why (a) Telling Maersk about myself, and (b) the qualities that made me worth hiring for the management trainee program, and I had to provide 3 references. (MISE) The 3rd interview was an all-day affair, I was interviewed in 2 sessions by 2 vice-presidents at a time.

Toyota Motor Company (Specialist)
1) Explain a time where someone else held your work from being completed. (The key to answering this question is working in a team, using consensus-based decision making, and the importance of meeting deadlines).
2) Explain a time where you had to lead/accomplish a situation with little instruction or ability (The key to answering this question was how do you pick up cues on what is to be expected, how do you ask questions and follow-up with folks who may forget about your project, and following up with others).
3) Name a time where you were involved with a task or assignment that involved a lot of tedious work. (They key to answering this question is how reduce waste in your work through time management and prioritizing).
Other Possible Questions:
4) The Toyota triangle includes three factors: Quality, Cost, and Safety. Which would you consider the most important attributes? (The key to answering this question is Safety because your consumer and respect for others comes first. Then quality, making sure you make the best parts to further safety and keep customers satisfied. ... Read more


Vault also maintains several other resources including Industry Employer Guides, Career Topic Guides, 53 Occupational Profiles, Industry Research, Company Research, an Internship Database, and the "Vault Electronic Water Cooler". These are all great, well-informed, and useful resources. I recommend checking them out!

Posted by kkowatch on July 02, 2008 at 09:19 AM | Comments (1)

The University of Chicago Career Fair

Thursday, June 26, 2008
9 am – 12 pm
Ida Noyes Hall
1212 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

The University of Chicago is the sixteenth largest employer in the Chicago metro area with an international, multi-ethnic community of 10,000 employees. The University of Chicago employees support a mission of research and education creating innovative changes around the world.

The University of Chicago’s Career Fair focuses on professional staff positions requiring degrees and experience. This is a “meet and greet? opportunity to learn more about UC, departments and position types.

Participating departments include Networking Services & Information Technology (NSIT), Graduate School of Business (GSB), Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, Humanities, Development and Alumni Relations, Facilities as well as the Medical Center and more!

Career categories include information technology, finance, healthcare, communications, fundraising, research, skilled trades and administration.

Street parking is limited and further reduced by construction. All attendees are strongly encouraged to take public transportation.
CTA
Metra

To see all open positions and apply online, please visit UChicago Jobs at https://jobopportunities.uchicago.edu

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer (AA/EOE).

Posted by kkowatch on June 11, 2008 at 07:52 AM | Comments (0)

Academic Library Contacts Resource

I pulled this entry from a listserv -- thought it might be a relevant resource for someone looking for specific contacts.

Searching for a Library Director, Librarian, or other Library-related job at colleges and universities in the USA, Canada, or elsewhere?

You can search for current library positions on Academic Careers Online at www.AcademicCareers.com. There is no charge or fee for applicants to use any of the applicant services. Applicants can search jobs, or open an applicant account and post a resume. Since new jobs are added daily you can also sign up through your applicant account to receive e-mail alerts when matching jobs are posted.

Robert J. Kuhne, Ph.D.
Academic Careers Online
485 Devon Park Drive, Suite 116
Wayne, PA 19087, USA
Telephone USA 610-964-9200
Email: Info@AcademicCareers.com
www.AcademicCareers.com

Posted by kkowatch on June 02, 2008 at 05:08 PM | Comments (0)

PEP at SI ... FAQs, Updates, etc

If you have accepted a summer internship and hope to get PEP credit for it, YOU MUST follow these steps by May 30th:

1)Your mentor must submit a proposal directly to the PEP office to Joanna Kroll at jckroll@umich.edu by May 30th. A sample proposal can be found here http://www.si.umich.edu/outreach/SampleProposal.doc . Joanna will be out of the office next week at a conference from May 27-30. In her absence, ALL PROPOSALS SHOULD BE SENT TO Kelly Kowatch at kkowatch@umich.edu

2)The PEP office will review the proposal, and contact you within 1-2 business days on the approval status

3)The Approval Status email from the PEP office will indicate your next steps and registration options (including ePortfolio access and instructions).

If you have already started your internship without PEP approval, we will not be able to retroactively count hours you have already worked. We can only count your hours once the internship has been approved by the PEP office.

Please let us know if you have any questions.

If you have questions about the PEP Process, there are resources available on the SI website under Fieldwork:

PEP Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) http://www.si.umich.edu/outreach/internships.htm
PEP Information for Mentors http://www.si.umich.edu/outreach/mentors.htm

Still looking for an internship? Check out where SI students have interned in the past and contact them to find out who they worked for: http://www.si.umich.edu/outreach/internship_portfolios.htm

Click on the Extended Entry to see change in the PEP program for incoming Fall 2008 students.

SI Curriculum Committee Updates PEP credit allocation policy for SI classes

The SI Curriculum Committee (consisting of several faculty and two MSI students) reviewed the allocation of PEP credits to SI classes and had made some changes in the way PEP credits are allocated resulting in some changes in how many PEP credits will be received for particular classes. The complete policy statement and rationale will be made available soon on the SI intranet for student access. The purpose of the review and the change was to create greater clarity, consistency, and fairness in the allocation of PEP credits for courses. Remember that PEP credits are a way to indicate which of your 48 academic credits also meet requirements for Practical Engagement. They do not add academic credits, they earmark which academic credits have a strong experiential focus.

Note that the guidelines related to PEP internships via SI 690 and SI 681 remains unchanged.

Some important points to note about the new policy:

Only new students entering in Fall 2008 will be held in full to the new policy.

Students who started before Fall, 2008 will not be impacted by any reductions in PEP credits for classes, but will receive additional PEP credits for classes where the PEP credits have been increased for classes they take in Fall 2008 or thereafter.

Students who started before Fall, 2008 will continue to be required to have a minimum of 6 PEP credits as part of their 48 credit degree program, with a maximum of 15 PEP credits allowed.

PEP credits will not be changed retroactively. Thus, PEP credits will not be altered for courses taken before Fall, 2008.

Here is a summary of the change and transition plan:

1) Effective for Fall 2008 entering students, The PEP requirement has been changed to 8 minimum / 15 maximum PEP credits as part of the 48 credit MSI degree.

2) The Curriculum Committee reviewed and adjusted how PEP credits are assigned, and are now basing decisions on PEP credits on how grading is allocated rather than the estimated number of hours students work on a project. The committee also clarified the nature of experiential activities that can count as PEP, and have determined that there must be a real-world engagement and real-world accountability for PEP credits to be assigned, though acknowledging that simulation exercises and projects are also very valuable and sometimes more appropriate for a particular class or learning objective.

3) As a result of the review of courses with PEP credits, some courses have gained PEP credits and some will lose them.

a. For courses gaining PEP credits, the change will take effect beginning Fall 2008 for all students

b. For courses losing PEP credits, the change will take effect in Fall 2008 for students entering in Fall 2008, but would not take effect at all for students who started before Fall 2008.

c. There will be no retroactive change to the number of PEP credits granted for courses taken earlier than Fall 2008.

As with any change, there is a transition period and we’ve been careful to ensure that continuing students are not adversely impacted by the change. Thus we have sought to allow continuing students to benefit from increases in PEP credits for courses taken in the coming year but not to be impacted by any reductions, and we are not increasing the minimum number of PEP credits required for continuing students.

Here is a chart indicating courses that have PEP credits assigned, and how those have changed, if at all:

New PEP Point Allocations for SI Courses, as of Fall, 2008
Course

Name - Old allocation - New allocation

SI 501 Contextual Inquiry & Project Management—(Previously…Use of Information)- 1 - 3

SI 572 (Previously 654)Database Application Design - 1 - 2

SI 596 Practical Engagement Workshop: Digital Librarianship (Internet Public Library) 3 - 1

SI 599/699 Practical Engagement Workshop: Information Technologies in Small Nonprofit Organizations - 3 - 3

SI 622 Evaluation of Systems and Services - 1 - 0

SI 623 Outcome-Based Evaluations of Programs & Services - 1 - 1

SI 631 CMS Projects - 3 - 3

SI 649 Information Visualization - 0 - 2

SI 682 Interface and Interaction Design - 1 - 2

SI 689 Computer Supported Cooperative Work - 1 - 0

SI 692 Practical Engagement Workshop in Archives & Records - 3 - 3

Posted by kkowatch on May 22, 2008 at 01:40 PM | Comments (0)

More Resources, etc

Things are sloooowww here at SI in the summer. Well, not too slow; there just aren't that many students around, but we're still pretty busy prepping for fall. I've had the chance to look at some of our resources and think of ways to make them more usable, accessible, and more tailored. If you have ideas, do let me know!

One resource that I came across that's posted on our website is Internship Programs.com Now, I'm typically not a big fan of national job posting sites such as Monster, but this one's not too bad. I was sort of suprised at the number of internships posted on there. Some of them are a stretch at being PEP-eligible internships, but you can always coax an employer in an interview to make the position a higher-level one to ensure that we'll approve it. But if you're still looking, I suggest checking this resource out. We've also got a slew of other online job tools at http://www.si.umich.edu/careers/online-resources.htm if you are interested. This is a short one, but I'm off to enjoy the sun! Sometimes the bright, sunny, yellow walls of my office just aren't the greatest source of Vitamin D! Have a great weekend. kk

Posted by kkowatch on May 09, 2008 at 04:37 PM | Comments (0)

Interviewing: Tips, Suggestions, Resources...

Lately, most of my appointments have revolved around preparing for interviews. We all know those people who interview and get lots of offers (which at one time in my life, that was me!) and then there is the rest of the world (which now includes me) who sometimes have several interviews and then get that one lucky job offer.

We all ask, “what is that makes these people who get lots of job offers different?? “What do they do that makes them impress the interviewers pretty much every time they have an interview?? The answers, from my perspective, are below...

1. Let them know you want the job. So many times, people interview really well for a position and are perfectly qualified, but leave the interview with the interviewers not that sure that they even want the job. Those people that let it be known, even simply by saying, "I really want this job", are often considered to be top candidates because everyone wants to work with someone who wants to be at work. A closely qualified candidate who really wants the job will usually get the position over the person who is most qualified by doesn’t seem too interested because the employer wants to hire some who sees the opportunity as just that: an opportunity (and not just a paycheck). Make sure before you leave every interview that you clearly indicate that you are very interested in this position and that you consider to be a great opportunity.

2. Research and preparation. This comes in three forms -- the company, the position, and your own resume and cover letter. My husband and I go back and forth on this: he never prepares for interviews where as I probably over prepare (yes, I spent two weeks once prepping for an interview! – I don’t recommend or condone this at all!) But it does take time to be adequately prepared for an interview – and trust, this shows when you meet with the interviewers. Even if you don’t have all the answers to the questions, the other information that you can supplement your experiences can make a huge difference.

--You should read the entire website of the organization over and any other literature that you can find so that you know as much as you can about the organization. You need to be prepared for that question, "What do you know about our organization" even if they don't ask it (because if you are, you can weave that information into the rest of your interview). Consider searching for the organization and seeing what they are up to in the news and on the internet – not just what their website says they are all about. And, its good to ask other people what they know about the organization or if they know of people who work there now or have in the past. If you can talk to them, they can often provide information that’s not readily available to the public.

--Review the job description and requirements. You should know this information through and through because it helps you tailor your answers. Its shocking to me how many people come in and want to talk about a job they applied for and how to prepare for it and they don't really know what the position entails (which also means to me that they didn't tailor their resume and/or cover letter at all). Being very familiar with the position description will help you in answering your questions accurately.

-- Review your resume and cover letter so that you know what have you said you have done. In an interview, they may ask you to work through your resume and share about your experiences and you want to be sure that you are consistent about what you've written (and the same for your cover letter). Reviewing your resume with the job description in mind will also help you tailor your answers about your experiences to what they are looking for. This will also help you to know what to elaborate on that you may have left off of your resume for space reasons.

3. Practice, practice, practice. Seriously, practicing interviewing questions makes ALL the difference in the world. If you can sit down and go over general and specific interview questions and either outline the answers or practice them out loud with a friend or by yourself, this will make a ton of difference. It’s good to think about answers to interview questions, but actually taking the time to practice answers out loud really does make a difference.

So what questions should you be using for practice? There are a couple resources for you to use -- and of course, you can do an internet search for "interview questions" and find a wide array to go from. My personal favorite is...

Job Interview Questions by Quint Careers - This database has 109 questions to go over that cover a wide range of soft/transferable skills, behavioral interviewing, and will really help you to reflect on questions regarding yoru preferred work, supervisory, and environment styles and methods.

The SI Careers Wiki - Interview Questions Resources for all SI Specializations -- This is a compilation that I've been putting together -- and since its a WIKI, you can add information too - on questions for the different specializations at SI. A wide range of questions that are tailored to LIS, ARM, HCI, etc that will make you think about what they are looking for.

When answering questions, you should keep the STAR approach in mind.

S/T - Situation or Task
Describe the situation that you were in or the task that you needed to accomplish. You must describe a specific event or situation, not a generalized description of what you have done in the past. Be sure to give enough detail for the interviewer to understand. This situation can be from a previous job, from a volunteer experience, or any relevant event.

A - Action you took
Describe the action you took and be sure to keep the focus on you. Even if you are discussing a group project or effort, describe what you did -- not the efforts of the team. Don't tell what you might do, tell what you did.

R- Results you achieved
What happened? How did the event end? What did you accomplish? What did you learn?

Use examples from internships, classes and school projects, activities, team participation, community service, hobbies and work experience -- anything really -- as examples of your past behavior. In addition, you may use examples of special accomplishments, whether personal or professional, such as scoring the winning touchdown, being elected president of your Greek organization, winning a prize for your artwork, surfing a big wave, or raising money for charity. Wherever possible, quantify your results. Numbers always impress employers. Remember that many behavioral questions try to get at how you responded to negative situations; you'll need to have examples of negative experiences ready, but try to choose negative experiences that you made the best of or -- better yet, those that had positive outcomes. (Taken from Wayne State University Career Services).

On a side note, it’s important to go over lots of interview questions because you never know what they are going to ask you. But, by going over a set of questions like the 109 Quint Careers questions, you will put together a nice collection of stories and experiences that will transfer to other questions that you may get asked.

Remember that interviewing is really only you telling stories about yourself. No one else know else knows these stories better than you do and there is no reason that with a little preparation and practice and enthusiasm, you can't be the one getting all the job offers. Oh, and don't forget to send a thank you!

Contact me if you want to go over interviews questions… I’m more than happy to help you develop answers to questions and to put together a strategy of how to best approach your next interview.

Posted by kkowatch on April 24, 2008 at 11:00 AM | Comments (1)